Main definitions of dun in English

: dun1dun2

dun1

adjective

  • 1Of a dull grayish-brown color.

    ‘a dun cow’
    • ‘The stark, dun hills of the Hindu Kush cradled plots of corn, beans and potatoes.’
    • ‘But what I saw was a peaceful landscape dotted with one man ploughing with a dun mule.’
    • ‘Into this dun world steps the elegant and cultured woman with vague ambitions to ‘tame inner-city thugs with recitations of poetry.’’
    • ‘Finally, he chuckled, and moved his own dun gelding up abreast of hers.’
    • ‘Tufts of balding, meager dun hair sprouted out from the man's scalp in every possible direction like a windblown bush, followed by wide, tangled eyebrows and small, beady, madly darting eyes which bulged from within a round, bloated face.’
    • ‘Colours (ochre, sand and white) are taken from pre-Columbian and colonial houses, and are intended to respond to the endless layers of dry dun dust that blow up and down the coast.’
    • ‘In literature the era of ‘offensively Australian’ nationalism and tediously dun naturalism was over.’
    • ‘After we ate, the servants readied our horses and we rode together, me on Mercy and he on a dun mare.’
    • ‘This book is an unremitting account of misery, privation, and pointlessness in a world of dun landscapes, tormenting insects, malnutrition, and cultural stagnancy.’
    • ‘California fog provides a unifying tonalist palette, especially in the dry season when the hills are dun colored.’
    • ‘He pointed to a dun lionhead that lumbered peaceful as a blimp.’
    • ‘Accepting the cup, she deftly uncorked the bottle and proceeded to cautiously shake finely ground, dun colored grains into the water.’
    • ‘Beyond the river the dun slopes of Creag Dhubh, the black crag, rose in steady tiers to form an isolated hill cut off from the main Monadh Liath plateau by the broad valley of the Calder.’
    • ‘The prevailing greyish dun distances were relieved by colour, by small spots of cheerful intimacy in patches of cultivation the more precious for being sustained in such arduous circumstances.’
    • ‘Realizing there was no chance of escape the struggling, captive woman dropped to her knees and glanced about, small eyes darting for a sympathetic face among the feral leers, limp dun hair lank against her fleshy, scantily clad back.’
    • ‘I gazed down upon the old quarter, a collage of dun roofs, domes and vaults, pencil and square minarets, ugliness and elegance.’
    • ‘That first look down the length of the boardwalk, the black line of trees between sunset-fired sky and swamp, the dun bulk of a wild pony in the scrub or a heron's pose in a field of reeds… the moment is unique, but it moves all of us just the same.’
    • ‘She shifted uneasily beside him, and looked up the road again as he came trotting back astride his dun mare; he shook his head long before he reached them, and dismounted a few paces off.’
    • ‘In summer, the watercourse provides a green belt that distinguishes the town from the dun expanse that surrounds it.’
    • ‘Like the others, she had exchanged her ball gown for a suit of dun deerskin, with a tall forester's cap, in which was affixed a long purple feather, which commingled with her black hair and nearly disappeared in it.’
    greyish-brown, brownish, dun-coloured, mud-coloured, mouse-coloured, mousy, muddy, khaki, umber
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1literary Dark; dusky.
      ‘when the dun evening comes’

noun

  • 1A dull grayish-brown color.

    • ‘Surrounding the cone on three sides were high walls of volcanic rock forming an amphitheater almost a mile and a half wide, a subtle palette of dun, gray, and beige.’
    • ‘A mutt the colour of dun stood near by, barking every now and again.’
  • 2A thing that is dun in color, in particular.

    1. 2.1A horse with a sandy or sandy-gray coat, black mane, tail, and lower legs, and a dark dorsal stripe.
      • ‘He laid the blanket on the back of the gaunt dun, moving his mouth - talking?’
      • ‘She was his mount, a unicorn mare with a dun's coat.’
      • ‘Three women were working in the kitchen and a man was sitting at the table, sipping black coffee from a cup bigger than the dun's hoof.’
      • ‘The Indians ride bareback on paints (white horses with dark colored markings) and duns (grayish brown horses) with snaffle bridles.’
      • ‘They were roans, grullas and duns, he said.’
      • ‘‘You were jumping so beautifully, and Minty looked so wonderful,’ she whispered, her fingers knotted in the sheets as she leaned close, speaking of his show-jumper, the gorgeous dun, ‘The triple.’’
      • ‘He crowed, bringing the dun, Kai, to a skidding halt just feet away from her.’
      • ‘The two stallions, a dun and a bay, were bred in Scotland by breeder and judge from Stirlingshire.’
      • ‘A white-fire blaze rang past her ear, and impacted the ground three paces before his gelding - the dun nickered it's anger at being so rudely startled, and danced around a moment.’
      • ‘Two of his mares were hitched to it; a cream dun and a paint.’
    2. 2.2A sub-adult mayfly, which has drab coloration and opaque wings.
      • ‘We went over nymphing tactics to start with and then, when the fish started rising to the duns, we started dry fly fishing.’
      • ‘A beautiful two pound rainbow spent the next couple of minutes trying its hardest to imitate one of the swallows that were gracefully taking duns from the surface.’
      • ‘But they can live for a week in the preceding stage, as winged, asexual duns; and before then, some live underwater for two or three years as nymphs.’
      • ‘I caught one of my biggest after-dark fish at this spot late one night on a fly that imitates a pale evening dun.’
      • ‘In July the three creeks - DePuy's, Nelson's, and Armstrong's - produce clouds of mayflies called pale morning duns, which draw monster rainbows to the surface.’
      • ‘Later they take the emerging fly, the hatched dun (or ‘green drakes’) and the ovipositing (egg laying) spinner.’
      • ‘Trout rise to the surface to feed first on the duns, and then again when the female spinners return to lay their eggs.’
      • ‘In mid-August, large hatches of a nighttime mayfly called the pale evening dun begin to appear.’
    3. 2.3An artificial fishing fly imitating this.

Origin

Old English dun, dunn, of Germanic origin; probably related to dusk.

Pronunciation:

dun

/dən/

Main definitions of dun in English

: dun1dun2

dun2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make persistent demands on (someone), especially for payment of a debt.

    ‘they would very likely start dunning you for payment of your taxes’
    ‘she received two dunning letters from the bank’
    • ‘She also collected small sums from people who owed her husband, including another female friend, whom she dunned for $20.’
    • ‘The fliers included information about gun safety and dunned recipients for donations to the partnership, which helped lead efforts to ban concealed carry permits.’
    • ‘They even tried to dun me while I was in the hospital!’
    • ‘Yet, they don't mind dunning parents when scofflaw children can't pay their bills.’
    • ‘Indeed, the biblical law is that debtors may not be dunned for repayment.’
    • ‘But to fund its new law, Maryland needs to dun taxpayers across the state an extra $1.3 billion a year.’
    • ‘Simple - until the losses get so high that the suppliers can't be dunned to fill out the OE profit projections, it's a case of ‘let the good times roll.’’
    • ‘The Vendome incident would haunt him for a long time, since well after he had served his prison sentence the Republican government would be dunning him for 500,000 francs, the cost of restoring the column.’
    • ‘Hospitals and doctors were dunning them for $15,000 in unpaid claims.’
    • ‘The tax dunned chemical and oil companies, among other industries, for money to clean up ‘orphan’ Superfund sites - sites whose owners have absconded or have gone bankrupt.’
    • ‘In trying to dun the states, the cigarette giants are invoking a little-noticed clause in the 1998 deal.’
    • ‘They had been dunning me for a £10 bill I had naively thought I would leave to the next serious accounting.’
    • ‘It wasn't a charity deal: Like other pro runners, the Elites would still have to pay 15 percent of their prize money, endorsements, and appearance fees, and once they started earning they'd also be dunned for rent.’
    • ‘Aside from the fact that no one will let us have anything on credit - save for the butcher and baker, which will also cease at the end of this week - I am being dunned for the school fees, the rent, and by the whole gang of them.’
    • ‘He invoiced the corporations for product placement, and when he went on tour to promote the book, he read a selection of the past-due letters he'd written, dunning the corporations for nonpayment.’
    • ‘When the Republic took a village, they would allow the landlord to dun the peasants for the lost money, something which hardly endeared the ‘democratic’ regime to its new citizens.’
    • ‘Have I decided to stop dunning you for contributions?’
    importune, solicit, petition, press, pressurize, plague, pester, nag, harass, hound, badger, beset
    mither
    hassle, bug
    View synonyms

noun

Archaic
  • 1A debt collector or an insistent creditor.

    1. 1.1A demand for payment.
      • ‘They start off with a dun from distributors for $2 at the door.’

Origin

Early 17th century (as a noun): from obsolete Dunkirk privateer, from the French port of Dunkirk.

Pronunciation:

dun

/dən/