Definition of dumbed-down in English:

dumbed-down

adjective

informal
  • Simplified so as to be intellectually undemanding and accessible to a wide audience.

    ‘the dumbed-down nature of modern politics’
    • ‘Considering that this is a television series, which usually indicates dumbed-down plots, the intricacy and darkness are both welcome and surprising.’
    • ‘It's still funnier and more interesting than most insultingly dumbed-down comedies.’
    • ‘It brings to mind other wartime nostalgia films like Life is Beautiful, except without the mawkishness that ruins those dumbed-down crowd-pleasers.’
    • ‘It's a tepid, dumbed-down attempt at making Othello palatable for young audiences.’
    • ‘Stung by earlier accusations that they are producing dumbed-down pseudo-science, the producers of Walking with Cavemen took pains to include serious scientists to make this program appear legitimate.’
    • ‘The problem today is not dumbed-down entertainment programmes, but the broader failure to promote intellectual and artistic standards.’
    • ‘This is a serious comic novel, a withering satire on dumbed-down culture, a gently ironic look at devotions and ambitions, and a redemptive parable about coping with grief.’
    • ‘To stifle opposition from big-money clients, some firms may give individual investors shorter, dumbed-down reports that get straight to the point.’
    • ‘It was dumbed-down government at its most inane.’
    • ‘On the proposed move of the Nine O'Clock News to 10 pm, he also hit back at the critics who fear that the proposed change will mean a dumbed-down BBC1.’
    • ‘The back cover is where it breaks down, with Day-Glo images, dumbed-down text, and an overall less sophisticated feel.’
    • ‘A lot of people think you can reach this community by delivering a dumbed-down, unbranded product.’
    • ‘The movie celebrates the pleasures of conversation, a quality that's been denigrated over the last few dumbed-down decades of American film.’
    • ‘The humour is so crass, to call it dumbed-down would be expansive.’
    • ‘If only cinema had more directors like him, particularly in this age of corporate, dumbed-down, market led "Event" movies.’
    • ‘This, surely, must be the ultimate in dumbed-down TV.’
    • ‘Do we have to put up with dumbed-down remakes of ideas from the past?’
    • ‘For die-hard classical fans, "accessible" can really mean "dumbed-down", so when that's how someone bills themselves, alarm bells start ringing.’
    • ‘Celebrities have become the heroes of our dumbed-down age.’
    • ‘Is it the real deal or just a dumbed-down lurch towards the lowbrow?’
    mass-market, tabloid, pop, popular, intellectually undemanding, lightweight, easy to understand, accessible, unpretentious, simple, simplistic
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