Definition of due process in English:

due process

(also due process of law)

noun

  • Fair treatment through the normal judicial system, especially as a citizen's entitlement.

    • ‘Their admission deprived the defendant of his constitutional rights of due process of law and a fair trial.’
    • ‘The judicial system does not ensure due process, and prisoners are often tortured.’
    • ‘What we mean by this is: either release the prisoners or charge and prosecute them with due process.’
    • ‘You are allowing the Executive to lock people up arbitrarily, perhaps for life, without due process.’
    • ‘The government is not permitting due process of law.’
    • ‘This process allows for a full impartial investigation and due process for the accused.’
    • ‘First, how could a defeated enemy be condemned without due process of law?’
    • ‘They claimed the constitutional right abridged was the right to due process of law.’
    • ‘He is entitled to due process because that is the freedom for which we are fighting!’
    • ‘No matter how heinous the charge, everyone is entitled to due process.’
    • ‘Neither can be taken away without due process of law - meaning notice and a hearing.’
    • ‘Policy considerations of crime control versus due process come into play.’
    • ‘Of course, we must not lose sight of due process and fair trial rights.’
    • ‘Essentially, what this process is portraying is a system void of due process for students.’
    • ‘If we have a system that allows due process, let us exhaust the process.’
    • ‘We must remember always that accusation is not proof and that conviction depends upon evidence and due process of law.’
    • ‘Explicit or implicit promises about future rulings are out of bounds - such promises if sought and given would indeed compromise judicial independence and due process of law.’
    • ‘A bill of attainder is the ultimate violation of both due process and separation of powers.’
    • ‘After all, the constitutional rights to due process of law and to equal protection of the laws attach to ‘persons,’ not just ‘citizens.’’
    • ‘The Mental Health Act provides the framework to ensure due process and respect for the rights of patients.’

Pronunciation:

due process

/d(y)o͞o prəˈses/