Definition of draw in English:

draw

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Produce (a picture or diagram) by making lines and marks, especially with a pen or pencil, on paper.

    ‘he drew a map’
    • ‘The sketches included a self-portrait drawn by the artist in 1937.’
    • ‘In a kitchen in Corringham, he drew a pencil sketch of the logo, featuring a globe flanked by a knife and fork, which he sent away to organisers, who adopted it for their cause.’
    • ‘All 280 pupils at the school drew self-portraits in coloured pencil and showcased them in a special exhibition in the school hall.’
    • ‘However the map was drawn in pencil, it had no towns, no villages, no roads, no mountain names, no river names.’
    • ‘Only after students have lightly drawn their designs in pencil are they allowed to crack open the watercolor set and splash ahead.’
    • ‘You can ask the children to create a different ending to the story or draw different pictures to illustrate what they have read.’
    • ‘He drew a lovely picture of St. Patrick and he likes sketching.’
    • ‘We held a competition to see who could draw the best picture of the world showing the links between all the countries of the UN.’
    • ‘If you buy the upgrade package the cartoonist will draw pictures of the characters in your book, talking about you.’
    • ‘Each picture was carefully drawn with pencil and then color was added, much as his mature artwork was done.’
    • ‘Rose was sitting quietly, absent-mindedly drawing her picture with thick, dark slashes of her pencil.’
    • ‘Next, the children drew pictures to represent some signs of spring.’
    • ‘Deacon draws pictures to illustrate the various ways of getting from A to B.’
    • ‘Pictures must be drawn in pencil, black ink or charcoal so that they can be copied onto the front page.’
    • ‘This is part of the Swindon Music Festival and children taking part have been asked to design and draw a picture that represents the festival.’
    • ‘Rege drew a diagram to illustrate body placement and its effect on decreasing speed rapidly.’
    • ‘Sara watched from her desk as kids chatted with friends, threw paper airplanes, and drew offensive pictures and symbols on the chalkboard.’
    • ‘But it is also a very attractive subject in itself, since its basic ideas can be understood very easily, and involve drawing colourful pictures.’
    • ‘This allows the user to draw diagrams or pictures more easily through software commands.’
    • ‘Thus it is impossible to draw the above picture in one pencil stroke without retracing.’
    sketch, make a drawing, make a drawing of, make a diagram, make a diagram of, pencil
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    1. 1.1 Produce an image of (someone or something) by making lines and marks.
      ‘I asked her to draw me’
      no object ‘she draws really well’
      • ‘He's an independent filmmaker now working for a Manhattan advertising firm, drawing animated tacos and hating on his boss every chance he gets.’
      • ‘It was obvious to me that the woman she'd drawn was real, not just imagined.’
      • ‘My guess is that is he is a good observer who draws what he sees.’
      • ‘He just draws on everything and smokes cigarettes all day long.’
      • ‘She could never draw properly when she knew someone was watching.’
      • ‘I started drawing and a piece of paper landed on my desk.’
      • ‘A note pinned to the fridge has a hen and a pan on fire drawn on it.’
      • ‘When police gave him a sheet of paper, he drew a grand piano.’
      • ‘The embodied capacity to write and draw seems to rule over the languid group of objects underneath.’
      • ‘Sometimes I go through spells when I just draw, when I just write, when I just paint.’
      • ‘A girl at the pub sits next to me, another forward blond, maybe four years old, and takes my paper and pen and draws me.’
      • ‘Peels were put in slide frames and studied under a binocular microscope and drawn using a camera lucida.’
      • ‘For example, a comic book character doesn't really come to life until drawn on a piece of paper or whatever.’
      • ‘The stuff I draw is a bit weird; it's just another way of expressing myself, it's just for me really.’
      • ‘In one of his last cartoons for the paper, Sherffius drew a Republican elephant riding a pig representing pork-barrel projects.’
      • ‘She drew soaring cityscapes in crayon, painted remote-looking girls in watercolor.’
      • ‘Dodger took another piece of paper and drew a cone with a wide base and a line near the bottom to show the ground; then near the top he put in a small circle connected to the cone by a line.’
      • ‘This time around, you are older, and you probably do not have the desire to draw, nor post your personal art on the family fridge.’
      • ‘Even just random swirly things suggest that he's got an amazing and steady hand at drawing.’
      • ‘He told his comrades that he could draw what was under the canvas.’
      sketch, make a drawing, make a drawing of, make a diagram, make a diagram of, pencil
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Trace or produce (a line or mark) on a surface.
      ‘she drew a wavering line down the board’
      figurative ‘where will we draw the outer boundaries of this Europe?’
      • ‘This incongruity revealed a much deeper problem than inconsistency in drawing racial lines between North and South.’
      • ‘Together, they drew lines, and squiggles, and circles, until the green crayon was exhausted.’
      • ‘Lines are drawn on a canvas, either harmonious curves or cosmic chaos.’
      • ‘An informal boundary line has been drawn between these armed camps.’
      • ‘He drew a line indicating the limit of the rainfall which coincided with the southern boundary of saltbush country.’
      • ‘A horizontal line was drawn 5 mm perpendicular from the sternum keel of each print.’
      • ‘It doesn't take much to chart really, just a program that lets you draw a straight line.’
      • ‘Please indicate italics by underlining and indicate boldface by drawing a wavy line beneath the affected characters.’
      • ‘He developed the hemicyclium, a sundial which has the hour lines drawn on the surface of a conic section giving greater accuracy.’
      • ‘He was drawing lines and putting numbers on various areas.’
      • ‘The main problem is a disagreement about where to draw the boundary lines between the camps.’
      • ‘And even areas where boundary lines have been drawn have not been free of problems.’
      • ‘China's territorial boundary line is drawn extending around contested islands in the South China Sea.’
      • ‘Then yesterday I was drawing wiggly lines in my sketchbook (like you do) and lo - people.’
      • ‘To help rectify this, Council will begin by redefining the city boundary - drawing a line beyond which transport and bulk services will not be offered.’
      • ‘Through that point draw a horizontal line to the intersection with the hypotenuse.’
      • ‘But to understand and analyze the overall debate, it is useful to draw the boundary lines with broad brushstrokes.’
      • ‘In the 1920s, Ireland had a Boundary Committee that drew the border between North and South.’
      • ‘It is not be the first time these areas have become part of this zone; in 1997 the line was drawn as far north as Nantes River.’
      • ‘He was an intelligent man and drew a line delineating that region of South Australia that experienced, by and large, reliable rainfall, from that which did not.’
      copy, reproduce, go over, draw over, draw the lines of
      View synonyms
  • 2Pull or drag (something such as a vehicle) so as to make it follow behind.

    ‘a cart drawn by two horses’
    • ‘Aunty Miss left her entire property to a mysterious young man who arrived in a brown carriage drawn by brown horses from the east a week after her death.’
    • ‘Steam engines were then made portable so that they could be drawn by horses.’
    • ‘The rarely-used Scottish state coach, drawn by four white horses, was escorted by two squadrons of the Household Cavalry.’
    • ‘Horses drawing carts clip-clop along the unsurfaced roads and gypsy children run barefoot in hot pursuit.’
    • ‘The princess and the fairy mage were bound by ropes as prisoners on a covered wagon drawn by two horses that didn't seem quite normal.’
    • ‘Behind him, drawn by two milky oxen, was a cart laid with cloth of purple.’
    • ‘Twelve enormous carved wheels appear to support the temple-chariot which is drawn by seven galloping horses.’
    • ‘The former soldier's coffin was draped in a Union Jack and carried to St Bartholomew's Church, in Park Lane, on a carriage drawn by two horses.’
    • ‘All of them were taken to a large area, once the Town Square, which was filled with large carts, drawn by black horses.’
    • ‘Sometime later it was adopted as a funeral carriage drawn by two horses.’
    • ‘Her glass carriage was drawn by four white horses decorated with pink plumage and two coach men dressed in white suits, pink ties and top hats.’
    • ‘He followed the same method as the Philistines when they sent it back to Israel and put it on a new cart, drawn by oxen.’
    • ‘Prince Rupert of the Rhine drove to the battle of Marston Moor in a coach drawn by six horses.’
    • ‘In 1990, authorities in Florence decreed that horses drawing carriages in the city must wear a form of nappies.’
    • ‘The path is just wide enough for a horse drawing a single cart.’
    • ‘He looked up to see a richly garbed carriage rumbling slowly and carefully toward him drawn by two dappled horses.’
    • ‘The hapless Christians mixed burning limestone and drew carts like horses, in between brutal beatings, from dawn to dusk.’
    • ‘The peasant I had seen on my way to Evora that morning, trudging a field behind a hand-plough drawn by a pair of bullocks, might have been his father.’
    • ‘He introduced ambulances volantes, light, two-wheeled, sprung vehicles, drawn by two horses, for the rapid evacuation of the wounded.’
    • ‘Although the roads were busy, this was mainly of vehicles drawn by sheep or goats or ancient bicycles.’
    1. 2.1 Pull or move (something) in a specified direction.
      ‘I drew back the blanket and uncovered the body’
      • ‘Kieran lay curled on his side, already drifting, waiting for the covers to be drawn over him.’
      • ‘For a moment I was blinded by pain and I pulled back, drawing my arm against my chest.’
      • ‘She moved closer, drawing her hand along his cheek.’
      • ‘As she moves back, she draws her hands around my neck and then toward her.’
      • ‘Smiling, Paragon drew his covers tighter and pondered up at the stars that his father's people adored so much.’
      • ‘Nine figures stood around it, in a circle, all save one were dressed in black robes, with hoods drawn up to cover their faces.’
      pull, haul, drag, tug, heave, trail, trawl, tow
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    2. 2.2 Gently pull or guide (someone) in a specified direction.
      ‘“David,” she whispered, drawing him aside’
      • ‘It had been as if some irresistible force had drawn him in her direction.’
      • ‘Having gently drawn us into the world of energy healing, she ‘slam dunks’ us here.’
      • ‘Completely undone, she drew him gently into her arms and held him.’
      • ‘She shrieked loudly, though it was most probably drowned out by the rain, as a hand grabbed her arm and sharply pulled her up, drawing her into the warm chest of some person.’
      • ‘Daniel wrapped his arms around her waist and pulled her close, drawing her into a deeper, more urgent kiss.’
      • ‘Taking the tankard from her, he set both their drinks aside and drew her into the circle of dancers prancing about the fire in time to a fiddler.’
      • ‘She pulled his shirt, drawing him closer to her and whispered in his ear.’
      • ‘He pulled Irene out the door and paused, drawing her to him.’
      • ‘‘Lady Margaret,’ he whispered, drawing me closer so I could feel his breath on my neck and face.’
      • ‘Gently pulling her to him, he drew her into an embrace and kissed her again.’
      • ‘I gently got Abigail into a sitting position and drew her against me.’
      • ‘Pulling her around to him he drew her onto his lap.’
      • ‘He draws the young woman aside, holding her ice-cold hand.’
      • ‘‘Good girl,’ he whispered, and he drew her in to kiss her for the first time.’
      • ‘He playfully pulled my sleeve, drawing me into a hug.’
      • ‘He impulsively drew her nearer to him as the dance started, guiding her through the steps.’
      • ‘I tightened my hold on Liv's fingers and she gently drew me inside.’
      • ‘He drew her to him gently, holding her against him, and she didn't resist but let herself turn fluid in his arms, let the touch of his lips on her face wash over her like a tide.’
      • ‘He drew me closer and pulled his cloak over our heads and stopped.’
      • ‘One day, while Danny was at work, Susan drew her daughter aside for a chat.’
    3. 2.3no object , with adverbial of direction Move in a slow steady way.
      ‘the train drew into the station’
      ‘the driver slowed as he drew even with me’
      • ‘As the plaintiff approached the coach he saw two other small boys near the coach and as he drew alongside the vehicle these boys jumped away and there was an explosion.’
      • ‘As the platform drew near and the train started to slow, I looked quickly out of the window to see everyone stood on the platform ready to greet me.’
      • ‘There had been about 90 of them, and I only managed to collect about half before the train drew into the station.’
      • ‘It was less than an hour later when the train drew into the City.’
      • ‘Her eyes focused through her vague attention, and narrowed on some signs that told her that a train station was drawing near.’
      • ‘At that moment I heard footsteps which slowed as they drew closer to my door.’
      • ‘He slowed as he drew near, like he sensed there was something there.’
      • ‘The train drew into Moscow's Paveletsky Station, platform number four.’
      • ‘Although to her dismay, his lips did not pucker nor did they even move as she drew near.’
      • ‘I slowed down to draw alongside the car I was overtaking.’
      • ‘My mind keeps repeating those words as the footsteps draw nearer.’
      • ‘Catherine leapt to her feet as the sounds of footsteps drew nearer.’
      • ‘Still moving, we drew nearer to the location and our hearts began to pound faster.’
      • ‘Still, as it drew into the station, it clearly wasn't packed to the gunnels.’
      • ‘The people's feet, ahead of us, moved onward, drawing away.’
      • ‘She grabbed Darwin's arm and stepped forward as the train drew to a stop in front of them.’
      • ‘The emergency cord was pulled, and as the tube train drew into Oval station a man dashed out of the doors and ran.’
      • ‘Brake slowed slightly as he drew even with a busy corner lot, filled with the happy associations of a mid-heat birthday party.’
      move, go, come, walk, proceed, progress, travel, continue, advance, get, make it, make one's way, pass, make a move, drive
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    4. 2.4no object , with adverbial Come to or arrive at a point in time or a specified point in a process.
      ‘the campaign drew to a close’
      ‘the time for the parade itself is drawing near’
      • ‘As each one drew to a close, thousands had gathered in the square to watch as the light faded in the evening sky and brightened simultaneously in the room where the Pope lay.’
      • ‘‘Dear Lillie, I leave Japan today with very great regret,’ he wrote from Kobe as August 1907 drew to a close.’
      • ‘The weekend drew to a close with an ecumenical service in the chapel of Woodlock House which was given to the Sisters of Cluny by the Malcomsons in the early 20th Century.’
      • ‘As the evening drew to a close, bevies of giggling schoolgirls and aspiring musicians poured out of the auditorium exchanging notes on the performances.’
      • ‘I was finishing an undergraduate degree at Sydney University in 1975, and heard many theories as the academic year drew to a close.’
      • ‘Another exhibition, ‘Leaving Home’, drew to a close yesterday.’
      • ‘The Master Games drew to a close on Saturday night, with two thirds of the 3,500 competitors taking home messages about the games and The Centre.’
      • ‘Then as the half drew to a close Martin showed keen awareness with a quickly taken free kick but was left frustrated as his kick curled the away from an unguarded net, the keeper stranded at his opposite post.’
      • ‘It drew to a close with ‘Hosanna’, composed by Caleb Simper.’
      • ‘By the early 1970s, as the war in Vietnam drew to a close, one-fifth of the Army's total manpower was in Europe.’
      • ‘As the show drew to a close (after a disappointingly short 60 minutes) I was left wanting slightly more.’
      • ‘As the month drew to a close the Local Authority added up the cost of everything it plans to do over the next five years and announced the bill will come to a total of £30 million.’
      • ‘The initial programme drew to a close in April but the UK government has since funded a second three-year project, which kicked off last month.’
      • ‘As the week of the Festival drew to a close, I still had not heard from you, and became worried that you may have lost my phone numbers, or just forgotten to ring me.’
      • ‘The four-day nonstop party honoring Queen Elizabeth II and her half century on the throne drew to a close today in the British capitol.’
      • ‘Loughglynn Marque Carnival drew to a close last Tuesday night and a ‘full house’ was present for the final dance with Brendan Shine and his band.’
      • ‘As it drew to a close last Sunday, the Festival was deemed highly successful both by the organisers and the many members of the public who had attended.’
      • ‘As the week drew to a close, the camp assembled for a final campfire.’
      • ‘With Spring Festival having arrived and Valentine's Day drawing near, the number of flowers that will be sold is expected to reach a record high.’
      • ‘As it drew to a close, however, it was realised that the monies raised would stretch to providing a second well - thanks to the generosity of all who participated.’
    5. 2.5 Pull (curtains, blinds, or other such coverings) shut or open.
      ‘do you want me to draw the drapes?’
      ‘she drew back the curtains and looked out’
      • ‘He drew the curtains shut silently and turned around, not offering a word.’
      • ‘She pulled the heavy window shut, drew the curtains, and fell sleepily onto the bed.’
      • ‘The waitress shuts the windows and draws the curtains.’
      • ‘Without her knowing, the man had shut the windows and drawn the curtains.’
      • ‘I drew open the curtains, let white light wash through the before dark room.’
      • ‘A little girl drew the curtains open to reveal a window to the street outside, where people walked by, seeming to be part of the performance.’
      • ‘She drew open the shower curtain and closed the shower.’
      • ‘We draw open the curtain and emerge from the cubicle together.’
      • ‘I drew open the curtains on a glorious day, the light even, clear, and merciless.’
      • ‘She shut the windows and drew her curtains, letting her gaze linger on the moon for a while.’
      • ‘The nurse drew the curtain shut again and walked off.’
      • ‘She walked over to the window and drew the curtains, shutting out the inquisitive glare of the moon.’
      • ‘She tightened her robe and drew open the curtains.’
      • ‘I switched off my bedside lamp and drew open the curtains.’
      • ‘A few moments later someone drew the curtains, shutting the light down to a soft dim.’
      • ‘The curtains were drawn so I moved quickly over to them to see what kind of view was behind them.’
      • ‘I closed the door behind me and drew the curtains open so the moonlight could beam into my room.’
      • ‘When it came to the end of the day, though, I was more than happy to draw the curtains and shut the day out.’
      • ‘He tried to spy Claire behind one of them, but as always the curtains were drawn shut.’
      • ‘The windows upstairs were shut, the curtains drawn.’
      close, shut, pull together, pull shut, pull to, draw to, lower
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    6. 2.6 Make (wire) by pulling a piece of metal through successively smaller holes.
      • ‘The structure of heavily drawn wire or rolled sheet consists of very long interlocking grains.’
      • ‘Aluminum wire, drawn from rolled rod, may be stranded into cable of any desired size and type.’
  • 3Take or obtain (liquid) from a container or receptacle.

    ‘he drew his gun and peered into the gloomy apartment’
    ‘the children went down to the pond to draw water’
    ‘the syringe drew off most of the fluid’
    ‘he met them with a drawn sword’
    • ‘The others stood, not questioning Jim's direction, and drew their guns for the second time in less than an hour.’
    • ‘There was also the chilling sound of a sword - several swords - being drawn.’
    • ‘The other acted immediately, drawing his gun and pulling the trigger.’
    • ‘The naturally occurring well is renowned for the purity of its water, which is drawn with the aid of a mechanical pump.’
    • ‘She tensed and sprang up, drawing her two swords.’
    • ‘Even when the idea of justice is interpreted in a positive light, one should refrain from drawing one's sword indiscriminately.’
    • ‘She quickly drew her knife, pulled him in by wrapping an arm around his neck.’
    • ‘He held the knife threateningly in his left hand, and drew his black ruby sword in his right.’
    • ‘The guards with the torches came running back and joined the other six in drawing swords and moving for the shadow that was pulling the gate open.’
    • ‘The doc drew off a lot of fluid - then it was up to Kris.’
    • ‘And he drew off the contents of the cyst with a needle.’
    • ‘I bit my lip in concentration and drew an arrow, pulling the bowstring taut.’
    • ‘Cecil quickly drew his other sword, and took a defensive stance.’
    • ‘He moves ever closer, drawing a dagger, with a smile on his face.’
    • ‘It was like leeches they used back when, to draw off bad blood but in this case they drew off fat.’
    • ‘He heard the whine of steel on scabbard and drew his two swords, barely crossing them in time to intercept her drive.’
    • ‘A violent row broke out between the four men at which stage the two attackers drew Samurai swords and attempted to slash their victims.’
    • ‘Women wash their hair in the water and householders draw some out to sprinkle in their doorways for a good harvest and fruitfulness to come.’
    • ‘The two other figures moved forward and drew their swords, then broke into a charge.’
    • ‘The blond drew a spiked chain, while the other drew a nefariously shaped sword.’
    pull out, take out, bring out, draw out, produce, fish out, extract, withdraw
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    1. 3.1 Run (a bath)
      ‘she drew him a hot bath’
      • ‘She drew a hot bath for herself and took down her long brown hair.’
      • ‘She took a breath and smiled, noting a bath already drawn for her.’
      • ‘An eternity of wheezy, sensitive romance later, your lover is slain, your bath drawn and now the blade is at your own flesh.’
      • ‘I went into the bathroom to find the bath already drawn for me.’
      • ‘Etria hummed to herself as she waited for her bath to be drawn.’
      • ‘To complete the effect, feel free to draw yourself a hot bath, and crawl in the tub with a nice cup of tea and a spreadsheet.’
      • ‘She walked towards her bathing room and looked at the bath that Filia had drawn for her.’
      • ‘The contractions were causing sufficient discomfort that the midwife on duty drew Heather a warm bath… which promptly caused the contractions to stop.’
      • ‘A bath had been drawn so I could cleanse myself of the dirt of traveling, which I gratefully did, drowning in the aroma of mint.’
      • ‘When Coleman returned to his home after his days on the street, Mac Donald reports, he drew himself a hot bath, got into it and started to cry.’
      • ‘Karen Nelson was contentedly lying in her husband's arms amidst the bubbles of the hot bath he had drawn.’
      • ‘She made her way out of bed and drew herself a hot bath.’
      • ‘Like me, you probably don't think twice about switching on a light, drawing a hot bath, turning up the heat or calling a friend on the phone.’
      • ‘She went into the bathroom and drew herself a nice hot bubble bath.’
      • ‘They had drawn a hot bath for her and Isabella with scented oils and a variety of soaps that Maria could never had imagined.’
      • ‘We get into the house, and while Nathan and his brother head straight for the living room, I run up the stairs and draw a long, hot bath for him.’
      • ‘She found it a bit strange that they had drawn her up a bath and then placed her in such a nicely furnished room, but was too weary to think on it much.’
      • ‘The three of us had baths drawn, two for Matt and Brock to share, and a private one for me.’
      • ‘All she wanted to do was to send Will over a friend's house, draw a hot bath, and go to bed.’
      • ‘Pippin wants a bath and they debate who is going to bathe first but see that three baths can be drawn at once.’
    2. 3.2draw something from Obtain something from (a particular source)
      ‘an independent panel of judges drawn from members of the public’
      ‘he draws inspiration from ordinary scenes and simple places’
      • ‘Should they be more discerning about the sources they draw their information from?’
      • ‘It draws its inspiration from Norway, where the government started phasing in smoking restrictions in the late 1980s, stipulating that 25 per cent of all tables in bars and restaurants must be non-smoking.’
      • ‘Performing in the traditional Irish style, he draws his inspiration from another age.’
      • ‘The collection of poetry by the Kilkelly man, who draws his inspiration from real life events, is available in Newsround, Main St., and Caulfield's, Upper Main St. Ballyhaunis.’
      • ‘In contrast, civilization's three previous historic forms of government drew their power from different sources.’
      • ‘The Carlow Brewing Company draws its inspiration from the history of the surrounding area to produce traditional Celtic recipes.’
      • ‘Historians now drew their inspiration from indigenous language sources and local colonial archives.’
      • ‘That extra man proved to be a hindrance to Laois however and it was Dublin who drew most inspiration from the situation.’
      • ‘While in England, he noticed that many of those working for the abolition of slavery drew their inspiration from the Bible.’
      • ‘Most ancient kings were attributed to the highest order of priesthood, and drew their authority from a divine source, for whom they acted as a living representative.’
      • ‘Evans draws her inspiration from an old-growth forest on Vancouver Island.’
      • ‘These four talented musicians draw their inspiration from widely varied sources of music.’
      • ‘He often draws his inspiration from animals and examples of his latest work use a study of lizards as a starting point.’
      • ‘The operating budget draws its funds from three sources: tuition dollars, alumni gifts through the annual fund and a portion of the return from the endowment, Aase said.’
      • ‘Thy drew their inspiration from a group of women who decided to walk around London in aid of breast cancer.’
      • ‘Other fountains drew their inspiration from various Greek legends, thus infusing a sense of mystery to every sight that one laid one's eyes on.’
      • ‘Assu draws his inspiration from his friends, family and mixed-cultural upbringing.’
      • ‘While he and his once-youthful collaborators have become modern icons, Baldry draws his inspiration from the masters of an even earlier era.’
      • ‘Even some of the government hospitals draw their supplies from the same source.’
      • ‘They also drew an inspiration from what they learn in the classroom, informs one of the art teachers who supervised the ambitious, annual project.’
    3. 3.3draw on Use (one's experience, talents, or skills) as a resource.
      ‘Sue has a lot of past experience to draw on’
      • ‘Is it possible, drawing on the experience of the past year, to identify the key components of a winning strategy against al-Qaeda?’
      • ‘Even our top leaders are guilty of such unnecessary qualification, which clearly does not draw on past experience.’
      • ‘Over the past few months he has been drawing on his remarkable experiences to become a motivational speaker, a role he uses to create a more positive image of disability in the workplace.’
      • ‘The editor suggests sources and resources to the writer, draws on personal experience and knowledge to widen the reach of the reporting and research.’
      • ‘As a result of pooling expertise and drawing on experience from past programmes, we can see that no two areas are the same in terms of rural development.’
      • ‘The previous rulers often spent hours browsing through the volumes during times of great peril, drawing on the experiences of the past for answers.’
      • ‘It is linking into the skills that exist outside the college and drawing on people's experience from their work, both inside and outside the college.’
      • ‘Chang will draw on personal experience to discuss the tragic past of the world's fastest growing superpower.’
      • ‘Inspired by her success and drawing on her past experience of office management and bookkeeping, she has now set up SAS Bookkeeping to provide bookkeeping, payroll and administration support to small businesses.’
      • ‘Human beings debate and discuss ideas, constructing arguments, drawing on past experiences and imagining future possibilities, in order to change the opinions of others.’
      • ‘Looking for a spark, head coach Mike Mularkey is drawing on past experience.’
      • ‘Whether you needed some time alone or preferred having someone nearby, you can draw on your past experiences to plan ahead.’
      • ‘They draw on memories of past experience when in pain, and this leads to thinking and behaviour, which is the result of those experiences.’
      • ‘Fremantle drew on his past experience in presenting yet another option.’
      • ‘We draw on ideas, experiences and talents from the community, and create shows and present them back to the community.’
      • ‘The idea is that our subconscious minds are constantly processing all sorts of information and drawing on our past experience, so that in many cases snap decisions turn out to be correct ones.’
      • ‘He has a spectrum of talents and draws on a wide range of experiences and influences, exposures and environments.’
      • ‘They have incredible resources, and can draw on talent from all over the world, and the standard of competition there really has no peer.’
      • ‘‘They developed the product and we can still draw on their talent and experience,’ said Braun.’
      • ‘Can the standoff be resolved in a ‘rational’ manner that draws on past experience to avoid the worst?’
      call on, have recourse to, avail oneself of, turn to, look to, fall back on, rely on, make use of, exploit, use, employ, utilize, bring into play
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    4. 3.4 Obtain or withdraw (money) from a bank or other source.
      ‘this check draws against my personal account’
      • ‘We were afraid that if we opened the door on treatment at all, then all of our money would be drawn away.’
      • ‘Money has been drawn away from deposit accounts to unit trusts, life assurance, and pension plans.’
      • ‘What is interesting is that all private sector industries are being run with money drawn from publicly owned banks.’
      • ‘When so much importance and security is given to draw one's own money from a bank, why not show similar care for one's health?’
      • ‘The MPs decided that the money drawn would be taxed by 16 per cent instead of the present 20 per cent.’
      • ‘Akzo subsidized these low prices by money drawn from the plastics sector.’
      • ‘No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law.’
      • ‘First, is this a situation in which money can be drawn down merely because there is a bona fide claim?’
      • ‘He said the bank would not draw or demand any money from the client as the bank would only claim insurance when one was fired.’
      • ‘The value is subject to the normal income tax on the money drawn down from the fund or annuity.’
      • ‘My mother has never paid a bill, written a cheque or drawn money from the bank in her life.’
      • ‘In the normal course customers pay their credit card accounts on time by drawing against deposits at banks on which effectively no interest is being paid.’
      • ‘Less money will be available to government, and that money will be drawn more heavily from those who have the least.’
      • ‘The money will be drawn using a card and a PIN at a post office.’
      • ‘You put off buying an annuity, invest the money, and draw some of it off as a pension.’
      withdraw, take out
      View synonyms
    5. 3.5Hunting Search (cover) for game.
    6. 3.6Bridge (of player) force the opponents to play (cards in a particular suit) by leading cards in that suit.
      ‘before establishing his diamonds, declarer must draw trumps’
      • ‘Any player who draws a card of the trump rank during the deal may place it face up on the table, and its suit then becomes trumps for the hand.’
      • ‘If you draw a card of the trump rank during the deal, you are not obliged to expose it immediately or at all.’
      • ‘The player who drew the trump card keeps it and begins phase two.’
      • ‘The declarer then draws an equal number of cards from the top of the heap, including the face-up trump card if the contract is vuelta.’
      • ‘A player who cannot play may be penalised by having to draw one or more cards from an undealt stock.’
    7. 3.7draw on Suck smoke from (a cigarette or pipe).
      • ‘Casually he stuck the incense in a brass bowl in front of a plastic Buddha, and drew on his cigarette.’
      • ‘Shivering in the cold and drawing on a cigarette, she keeps a wary eye on any passers by.’
      • ‘She lit a cigarette, her fingers brown from nicotine, and wheezed as she drew on the unfiltered smoke.’
      • ‘She drew on her smoke and put it out in a plant pot at the twins' door then turned down the hallway and into her room.’
      • ‘But once the ban is in place, even filming an actor drawing on a cigarette will be against the law, since all enclosed public spaces - including film sets - are out of bounds.’
      • ‘As the Scottish actor draws on his cigarette in the vain hope it will warm him up, a passer-by stops to gaze at him.’
      • ‘Farner draws on his cigarette, exhales, and spits.’
      • ‘‘I loathe him,’ he said as he drew on a cigarette outside his office.’
      • ‘He drew on his cigarette dramatically, exhaling with an equally dramatic sigh.’
      • ‘He sat opposite me, at a table on the riverside terrace of the ITV studios on London's South Bank, talking excitedly into my tape recorder, pausing only to draw on his cigarette.’
      • ‘She watched as he tilted his hat back on his head and drew on his cigarette.’
      • ‘Ben Menashe is drawing on another cigarette while simultaneously undressing before the eyes of the general public in the jockey's improvised changing room, a horse stall at the end of the parade ring.’
      • ‘True, I did not stand there, nonchalantly drawing on a cigarette’
      • ‘‘It's going to be crazy,’ said Rob O'Rourke, sipping a pint of lager and drawing on a cigarette outside Paddy Foley's, the Irish bar he manages.’
      • ‘He draws on his cigarette and looks out the kitchen window again.’
      • ‘You draw on it like a cigarette and nicotine passes into your mouth.’
      • ‘She coughed after drawing on the smoke, and when she finished, Deidre became aware of her raspy breathing.’
      • ‘Eric frowned thoughtfully and drew on his pipe.’
      • ‘They shared a match, then each took a contented draw on his pipe.’
      • ‘Hands shaking, he took one from the pack and lit it, drawing on it deeply, letting the smoke fill his lungs.’
      puff on, draw on, pull on
      View synonyms
    8. 3.8no object (of a chimney, flue, or fire) allow air to flow in and upward freely, so that a fire can burn.
      ‘failure of a fire to draw properly can have a number of causes’
      • ‘The chimney was drawing well and the smoke was quickly sucked out of the room.’
    9. 3.9 Take in (a breath)
      ‘Mrs. Feather drew a long breath and let it out’
      • ‘I drew a few ragged breaths and fought to regain my composure.’
      • ‘So back we go to Brewer, Pennsylvannia, as the century draws its last wheezy breaths where everything's changed and nothing's very different.’
      • ‘You wait and wait for the exhale, but it never comes, because the breath is still being drawn.’
      • ‘And Barrett looks to be the best candidate for the job who's ever drawn a breath.’
      • ‘Joe drew a few deep breaths and turned angrily on his heel.’
      • ‘He resisted the urge to swallow, hard, and drew a long careful breath.’
      • ‘She drew a deep calming breath and put his hand back on the covers.’
      • ‘She drew a few deep breaths and padded toward the bathroom as she stripped off her nightgown.’
      • ‘The air seemed thick for a moment as Rebecca drew short, labored breaths.’
      • ‘When I inhaled, the needle would move from 130 to 0 before I had drawn half a breath.’
      • ‘The child drew her first lusty breath, and all memory of Before was buried to allow the child to grow.’
      • ‘I veer into the middle lane again, car swerving wildly, and draw a second deep breath.’
      • ‘Each breath she drew seemed deeper and stronger than the last.’
      • ‘After drawing the requisite deep breath, he began to speak.’
      breathe in, inhale, suck in, inspire, respire
      View synonyms
    10. 3.10no object (of tea) be left standing so that the flavor is extracted from the leaves.
      ‘a pot of tea is allowed to draw’
    11. 3.11 Disembowel.
      ‘after a mockery of a trial he was hanged, drawn, and quartered’
      disembowel, eviscerate, dress, clean, remove the innards from, remove the guts from
      View synonyms
  • 4Be the cause of (a specified response)

    ‘he drew criticism for his lavish spending’
    • ‘However, pure air drew no enhanced response from this region.’
    • ‘The exhibition drew such a strong response from visitors that Cartwright Hall decided to have a permanent collection of calligraphy from the Muslim world.’
    • ‘It's an olive branch sheathed like a blade, but it draws the largest applause of the night.’
    • ‘Yet her first aria as Liu drew the first overwhelming applause of the evening.’
    • ‘That should draw the largest applause in the Old Vic.’
    • ‘It became clear, however, that the play drew a rather different response from much of its audience.’
    • ‘The comments represented a break from earlier determined predictions of victory, and drew an immediate Democratic response.’
    • ‘In each particular case, the appropriate response must be drawn from prayer and grace.’
    • ‘The biggest hole in the first draft of the bill, and which drew the heaviest criticism was the failure to mention the right to a Gaelic education.’
    • ‘This was one of the aspects of ‘Patriot II’ that drew the most criticism.’
    • ‘I write to address criticisms drawn in response to my call for a secret ballot.’
    • ‘‘As the law concerns almost everyone, it drew a bigger response than any other amendment,’ Zhang said.’
    • ‘While the paragraph on the Holocaust draws the most emotional responses, other points have also sparked criticism.’
    • ‘This aspect of homeopathy draws the most criticism because it's difficult to understand and has no scientific explanation.’
    • ‘The USA drew the loudest applause of the day at the Pond, which was open to the public.’
    • ‘Any suggestion of a major disturbance in the temple precincts would have drawn an immediate vigorous response.’
    • ‘It is in this vein that economics draws the most criticism from the ‘hard’ sciences.’
    • ‘Another cover version drew a more mixed response from both these listeners, however.’
    • ‘Based on the data, the company buys additional time on stations that draw the best response.’
    • ‘What kind of world is this that when a person states the obvious, it is so counter to the deceptive spin of the media and the government that it draws the strongest applause of the conference?’
    1. 4.1 Attract (someone) to come to a place or an event.
      ‘you really drew the crowds with your playing’
      ‘customers drawn in by the reductions’
      • ‘Over the years, no event ever drew such crowds to town and it was a day of days that never failed to give people a day out and of course it will jog old memories.’
      • ‘Such events often draw crowds of several hundred people and are well covered in local and regional newspapers.’
      • ‘The event drew record crowds for the three day festival with 150,000 in attendance.’
      • ‘We create attractive cost efficient websites that will draw visitors and customers to your business or personal web pages.’
      • ‘The monsters and other sci-fi characters are the attractions that draw people to our events, and help us raise money.’
      • ‘But it was the opening event that had drawn a healthy crowd of onlookers.’
      • ‘The groups have wanted to use park space for this cultural event, which draws visitors and participants from all corners of the United States.’
      • ‘His funeral will be at the National Cathedral, an event likely to draw world leaders.’
      • ‘Soaring temperatures brought Lewisham residents out in force to enjoy two annual events which always draw a huge crowd.’
      • ‘The English department held a teach-in that, like other such events, drew a crowd.’
      • ‘The Thursday before the two marquee events drew a crowd of 23,630.’
      • ‘This eagerly anticipated annual event once again drew the crowds and this time there was the added attraction of an extra race on the town centre circuit.’
      • ‘Not only does he brew the tsipouro, he's also a talented singer, and was ‘in concert’ for guests one night, an event which also drew a large audience of locals.’
      • ‘The event drew an enthusiastic audience of 1,100 on a Saturday evening.’
      • ‘The event drew a huge crowd, as this sport gatherers greater and greater interest amongst the locals.’
      • ‘In this city, fashion events always draw excited crowds.’
      • ‘Here, luxuriously confined, they drew crowds of visitors attracted by their boisterous commentary.’
      • ‘It attracts advertisers by drawing a large audience of users to its service.’
      • ‘Although Friday was cloudy and blighted with intermittent rain, the weather proved kind on Saturday with sunshine and warmth drawing crowds to the event.’
      • ‘All nine drivers deserve the highest praise for performing faultlessly throughout the event, which drew a total crowd of nearly 100,000 over the three days.’
      attract, interest, win, capture, catch the eye of, catch, catch hold of, hold, grip, engage, allure, lure, entice, invite
      View synonyms
    2. 4.2 Induce (someone) to reveal or do something.
      ‘I would rather not be drawn into your argument’
      • ‘We need to maintain a firm policy on outlawing prostitution, while also addressing the reasons why men and women are drawn into it.’
      • ‘He was drawn into a street brawl that, for him, proved lethal.’
      • ‘Over the course of the week I spent with Marcon, I was drawn into the slavish drudge work that haute cuisine demands.’
      • ‘It's working because we're not producing the kinds of jobs we need, good jobs, in this economy and people are drawn into the military.’
      • ‘It was important not just because of the verbal spat he was drawn into with White, but also because of a smaller controversy closer to home.’
      • ‘By the way, if ever you're drawn into betting on the mee-pok man, here's a tip.’
      • ‘Ministers hope the national launch of the scheme will help nip offending in the bud and stop young people being drawn into a life of crime.’
      • ‘She is drawn into a secret society of sacrificial murder.’
      • ‘By giving us characters that we care for, we are genuinely drawn into the competition and acquire an interest you never would have thought possible.’
      • ‘But he was drawn into experimenting with drugs as he grew older.’
      • ‘But instead, I was entirely drawn into the teenage drama happening next door.’
      • ‘It was then he was unwittingly drawn into one of the industry's most famous frauds, though he was entirely innocent.’
      • ‘If you are drawn into a commitment to how you will vote, you'll only be ratifying the corruption of the confirmation process.’
      • ‘She is only drawn into his personal drama when he is forced to reveal secrets.’
      • ‘United manager Alex Smith was also drawn on the topic afterwards.’
      • ‘People are drawn into the debate for a variety of reasons.’
      • ‘Det Chief Supt Howlett confirmed the body had been buried but would not be drawn into revealing any further details.’
      • ‘He is drawn into the struggle after meeting Uva, an eco-warrior who becomes his lover and who also vanishes.’
      • ‘With even individual users being drawn into lawsuits, the legal waters have become very choppy indeed.’
      • ‘Willy-nilly and no doubt unwillingly, he is then drawn into the fight; in an instant the man in the middle has become the man in a muddle and nothing at all has been achieved.’
    3. 4.3 Direct or attract (someone's attention) to something.
      ‘it was an outrage and we had to draw people's attention to it’
      • ‘I draw the Court's attention to the fact that the intent of this application was for the imprisonment of me, as the respondent to the application.’
      • ‘Of late, though, my attention has been drawn away by a new game, scheduled to be released early next year, called Freedom Force.’
      • ‘Perhaps then, attention should be drawn to the aspects that the team does have.’
      • ‘Attention was first drawn to the flat when workers in the bakery below reported a brownish-coloured fluid staining their walls on Tuesday.’
      • ‘Both girls were chanting, causing more attention to be drawn to them as they drove along in the cherry red sports car.’
      • ‘Not since the Getty Center has a new Los Angeles building attracted the attention drawn by the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels.’
      • ‘When they finally came onstage, my attention immediately was drawn to their pants.’
      • ‘Since attention has been drawn to dog fouling there has been no dog mess in the verge.’
      • ‘By the way, can I draw everyone's attention to my overuse of parentheses in the last paragraph?’
      • ‘But what's drawn everyone's attention of course is the high, the highest tax rate.’
      • ‘But it is the idea of introducing new innovative transport schemes, such as a mass transit system, that will draw the most attention.’
      • ‘Angelos caught her hand, which muted her thoughts and drew her attention instantly in alarm.’
      • ‘Now our attention has been drawn to a magazine item, ominously headed ‘Coppergate row continues’.’
      • ‘In other words, their attention has been drawn to a stimulus, without any knowledge or appreciation of the significance of the stimulus.’
      • ‘Though more public attention has been drawn to homeworkers, eight years later, their situations have barely improved.’
      • ‘During argument, my attention has been drawn to certain decisions on the duty to give reasons in a planning context.’
      • ‘A great variety of attractive gifts drew everyone's attention for purchases at the cake stall, toys, raffles, bric-a-brac.’
      • ‘It drew the Government's attention to the economic benefits of giving the Western Bay the same priority as Auckland's urgent needs.’
      • ‘It glittered with the intensity of the sun, then brighter, drawing everyone's attention to her instead.’
      • ‘But none of these accomplishments would draw the attention Birthday Letters did.’
    4. 4.4 Reach (a conclusion) by deduction or inference from a set of circumstances.
      ‘the moral to be drawn is that spending wins votes’
      • ‘It depends upon inferences to be drawn from various circumstances.’
      • ‘There is as much a need to remind the jury of the circumstances in which a proper inference may be drawn under section 34 as under section 35.’
      • ‘Theres a moral or parable or some sort of conclusion to be drawn from that there…’
      • ‘In the circumstances, a negative inference cannot be drawn against the Bank as a result of its failure to produce the transaction slips.’
      • ‘That case which was Weisensteiner, the court said that in the circumstances of the case, an adverse inference should be drawn.’
      • ‘I can see that there could be circumstances where one would draw that conclusion.’
      • ‘Putting it that way, of course, would have made it far more difficult to draw simplistic moral conclusions.’
      • ‘So Rushton's use of this data to draw the conclusions he reaches about hereditability is sound in my opinion.’
      • ‘I am wholly unable to draw any such inference or conclusion.’
      • ‘This involves a consideration of the reasonableness of the inferences to be drawn from the circumstantial evidence.’
      • ‘But the only moral conclusion we can draw from this is that we shouldn't be cloning humans yet.’
      • ‘Firstly, there must have been some overt act by the land owner or some demonstrable circumstances from which the inference can be drawn that permission was in fact given.’
      • ‘Now, it is our submission that the conclusion which the trial judge drew based upon those inferences was a proper one and well open to him in the circumstances.’
      • ‘Let me detail this a little, and then draw some broader conclusions at the end.’
      • ‘What conclusions could we draw under these circumstances?’
      deduce, infer, conclude, derive, gather, glean
      View synonyms
    5. 4.5 Formulate or perceive (a comparison or distinction)
      ‘the law drew a clear distinction between innocent and fraudulent misrepresentation’
      • ‘Third, if a distinction is to be drawn between the law as it applies to packaging and to advertisements, precisely where does one end and the other begin?’
      • ‘I can see the reasoning, but don't think it draws clear enough distinctions.’
      • ‘A distinction might be drawn between a culture and a belief system (religious or otherwise).’
      • ‘To make it clear, South Australia draws no such distinction.’
      • ‘It's a fine distinction to be drawn, clearly - but we know that governments have more information than the general public.’
      • ‘It is too late to point all this out now that the distinction has been drawn.’
      • ‘However, William James also drew a further distinction which is not strongly represented in modern studies of attention.’
      • ‘A distinction can be drawn between ‘superstitions’ and other kinds of folklore belief.’
      • ‘For the writer, there's a fine distinction to be drawn between caption text and speech bubble.’
      • ‘A crucial distinction has been drawn between reproductive and therapeutic cloning.’
      • ‘But there is a distinction to be drawn after you have proceedings on foot.’
      • ‘The Court's opinion draws no such distinction.’
      • ‘Current research also confirms that important distinctions are to be drawn among different suicide criteria.’
      • ‘A broad distinction may be drawn between interpretive and non-interpretive approaches to ethnographic inquiry.’
      • ‘The Committee supports the need for a distinction to be drawn between such party-political activities and other types of lobbying activity.’
      • ‘The Court drew a somewhat uneasy distinction between documentary evidence and oral explanations.’
      • ‘No distinction will be drawn between the commercial and leisure sectors and the limits will apply to anyone who is flying or working with aircraft in their free time.’
      • ‘Some Western leaders are drawing a sharper distinction in the debate of freedom of speech.’
      • ‘In my view, the law draws a clear distinction between fiduciary duties and other duties that may be owed by a person in a fiduciary position.’
      • ‘I do not think there is any distinction to be drawn between these different categories (nursing care and child-minding).’
  • 5Select (a ticket or name) randomly to decide winners in a lottery, opponents in a sporting contest, etc.

    ‘she drew a ticket and announced the number but no one claimed it’
  • 6British Finish (a contest or game) with an even score; tie.

    with object and complement ‘Brazil had drawn a stormy match 1–1’
    • ‘Along the way they have won 29 and drawn one, scoring 193 goals and conceding just 34.’
    • ‘He lost twice and drew three games to finish a distant 31st with 7.5 points.’
    • ‘This looks like being a record season for games being drawn at halftime - I may well come back to revisit this subject in April or May when we'll know if the trend has continued.’
    • ‘Albion Sports made it through to the last four of the West Riding County Sunday Cup but Queens Athletic will have to wait until the weekend after drawing their game.’
    • ‘Bucks are yet to win a game in six matches, having drawn three which takes their points tally to only three - a point above bottom of the log, Jomo Cosmos.’
    • ‘But he hung on, and drew the next 17 games before losing yet again in the 27th game.’
    • ‘Yorkshire showed several changes from the side which drew their Championship match against Lancashire at Old Trafford last week.’
    • ‘Two other Zambians at the championship, Jere and Mwali drew their game after being matched together in the third round.’
    • ‘Simutowe lost his seventh game before drawing his eighth at the seven-round tournament where two extra rounds were added.’
    • ‘If the name of the game was to draw games Greengates would have won the league already.’
    • ‘Passage won five of the six games played and drew the other.’
    • ‘But during a week of brilliant sunshine the Carlow Town lads also shone brightly as they went from strength to strength, winning six games, drawing one and losing one.’
    • ‘It was in Nancy that I had my biggest spat with a team-mate, who came on as substitute and twice got caught in possession so that we drew a game we had led 2-0.’
    • ‘We drew the game 1-1, but they are an excellent footballing side and I'm not surprised to see them up near the top of the table.’
    • ‘After that game, the talk was about Nchelenge who out of their four preliminary games lost only one and drew three games against Sikalongo, Kasama and St Johns.’
    • ‘Eagles, who last season grabbed most of the silverware on offer, won all their five games while Buffaloes and LCC won three and drew one game each.’
    • ‘If you look at it, we have been 2-0 up in two or three games this season and we've thrown it away because teams have come back at us and they've either won or drawn the game.’
    • ‘And to rub salt in the wound Rovers completed the job at the Reebok Stadium after drawing the first game at Prenton Park.’
    • ‘Both had won five of their previous six games, drawing the other, but the Third Division side dominated possession for much of the match.’
    • ‘Sandeep seemed to be happy with the silver, after quickly drawing his final round game against compatriot K. Narayanan, who won the bronze with five points.’
  • 7Golf
    Hit (the ball) so that it travels slightly to the left (for a left-handed player, the right), usually as a result of spin given to the ball.

    ‘he had to learn to draw the ball—not least for the tee shots at Augusta’
    Compare with fade (sense 3 of the verb)
    • ‘If the lie angle is slightly upright, it might draw the ball a little, but the effect on ball flight is minimal.’
    • ‘We went down to see him a couple of days later, and he basically taught me about drawing and cutting the ball.’
    • ‘If you're doing the drill correctly, the ball should even draw slightly.’
    • ‘Even a slightly damp clubface hinders your ability to impart spin on the ball, reducing your ability to draw and fade the shot on command.’
  • 8Billiards
    Impart backspin to (the cue ball), making it move backwards after hitting an object ball.

  • 9(of a ship) require (a specified depth of water) to float in; have (a certain draft)

    ‘boats that draw only a few inches of water’
    • ‘Vessels drawing 22.5 feet of water have also come direct to the quay.’
    • ‘A Viking ship typically drew only about three feet of water and they were experts at sailing on rivers.’
  • 10no object (of a sail) be filled with wind.

  • 11Extract (an object) from a container or receptacle.

    ‘he drew his gun and peered into the gloomy apartment’
    pull out, take out, bring out, draw out, produce, fish out, extract, withdraw
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1An act of selecting names randomly, typically by extracting them from a bag or other container, to match competitors in a game or tournament.

    ‘the draw has been made for this year's tournament’
    • ‘For each number on the play coupon that matches the weekly draw, there is a prize to be won.’
    • ‘Two more weeks remain in this league followed by a fun bowling Friday at which time new team members are selected by a blind draw.’
    • ‘By May 30, the commission will hold a draw to decide the order in which parties will be listed on the ballot.’
    • ‘The winners are to be selected by a draw of lots on Valentine's Day.’
    • ‘The importance of sellers was emphasised when after the draw it was decided to distribute lots of five lottery tickets to all who had sold two cards or more.’
    • ‘With every purchase of the calendar, buyers can submit their names for a monthly draw.’
    • ‘I was told when the last fixtures were made it would be decided in a draw.’
    • ‘The two boys will now have their names entered into the draw for participation in the National Finals in Belfast in 2006.’
    • ‘The winner will be the first entry selected after the draw closes at midnight.’
    • ‘Olympic draws are made at random and the competition works on a knockout basis through to the gold medal bout.’
    • ‘There were 19 names in the draw and the lucky winner was Mariel Campion, Ballyhemmon.’
    • ‘This was followed by a random draw of names from the entire ship's company to work in that space.’
    • ‘He is also said to have thrown food at away fans, disrupted a lottery draw and had a tussle with Norwich City's director of football Brian Hamilton.’
    • ‘‘I'm happy to have got the win and got our names in the draw,’ said coach Gary Moorby after the victory.’
    • ‘The heroines of the female sport came up with the most innovative fundraising idea of the year when they decided to hold a draw to see who would be their main sponsor.’
    • ‘The draw to select the winning entries will take place on Friday, 23 January 2004’
    • ‘The random draw from November 25 will be closely monitored by the auditing firm Deloitte and Touche.’
    • ‘Please enter your name for the draw which takes place on Thursday evening.’
    • ‘This league will consist of ten teams of three players per team with the team captain selected by the sponsor and the remaining two players selected in the draw.’
    • ‘The names of all students were entered in a draw and one name was drawn for every $100 donation, says Gallo.’
    raffle, lottery, sweepstake, sweep, tombola, ballot
    View synonyms
  • 2British A game or contest that ends with the score even; a tie.

    • ‘Would you believe it, the match was declared a draw?’
    • ‘They won all their games in the final round of matches to finish the campaign with 16 wins and two draws from their 18 matches to finish eight points clear.’
    • ‘When enough people on both sides have made enough mistakes the game is over, except that this is England so it's probably started raining by then and the game is therefore a draw.’
    • ‘They beat Newcastle United in a replay at Old Trafford after the first match between the two teams ended in a scoreless draw at Crystal Palace.’
    • ‘I divided them into three groups and told one group that one team would win, one group that the other team would win, and the third group that the match would be a draw.’
    • ‘In the rain, they could not restore their composure and the match drifted to a draw.’
    • ‘But despite his efforts, it's not enough: the points are still even and the match is a draw.’
    • ‘The game looked set to end in a draw as the match ticked over into time added on.’
    • ‘Both boys hoped for victory, but the match was a draw and they settled for an ice cream and chocolate instead.’
    • ‘A short-rising ball from Farmer was unplayable by the batsman and the match ended as a draw with the scores tied.’
    • ‘The second team does not wilt and also puts up a big score… and the match is a draw anyway.’
    • ‘There was a goalless draw and the match gave die-hard fans who had come to see the stars quite a few moments to cherish.’
    • ‘This season the Berkshire club have lost only four times in 21 games, with seven wins and three draws from 13 league matches.’
    • ‘The under-12s girls team had an extended programme and ended their marathon with five wins and a draw from their six matches.’
    • ‘In the series City have won 26 times with 12 draws and scored 91 goals to 41.’
    • ‘After a great match a draw was probably a fair result in the end.’
    • ‘Stamford Bridge missed the chance to go second as they were held to a scoreless draw by Fulford United in an even game spoilt by the wind and a bumpy pitch.’
    • ‘An inspired batting display by South Nutfield was not enough to defeat North Holmwood on Saturday, as the match ended in a draw.’
    • ‘They will probably be joined by Schalke who have two victories and two draws from their five games to date.’
    • ‘We always feel we're able to win, but we end every match in a draw.’
    tie, dead heat, stalemate
    View synonyms
  • 3A person or thing that is very attractive or interesting.

    ‘the museum has turned out to be a big draw for schoolchildren in the city’
    • ‘The dump is a big draw to gulls and crows and I'm sure I'll see something good in the gull department.’
    • ‘Those things are all big draws and I appreciate them immensely.’
    • ‘This was one of the biggest draws at of Lollapalooza.’
    • ‘Promising to be the big draw of the festival, it features an intricate weaving of different conversations taking place in a city.’
    • ‘There were good entries in all sections but it was the equine classes which proved to be the biggest draw with competitors up by 50%.’
    • ‘One of the bigger draws, for me, is the character of Canon Black.’
    • ‘Having spent years working and living in London and across Eastern Europe, the solitude and beauty of the landscape offered a powerful draw.’
    • ‘The puffins are the biggest draw but a vast array of other seabirds including tens of thousands of guillemots and razorbills are there during the spring and summer.’
    • ‘No, not a state where everything is free, although that would surely be a powerful draw to citizens of the other 49.’
    • ‘An exhibition of geological data and samples organised at the Museum auditorium has turned out to be a big draw for school children in the city.’
    • ‘The skill and fitness levels have gone up many notches and very impressive attendances now pay into the finals, so the occasions are big draws with plenty of hype.’
    • ‘At a time when anti-corporate documentaries are big box office draws maybe it is unnecessary to wrap a political message in old clothes.’
    • ‘Handicrafts and handlooms exhibitions are always a big draw.’
    • ‘Books on self-improvement have been a big draw at book fairs.’
    • ‘Although the movie will screen out of competition at Cannes, it's bound to be one of the biggest draws of the festival, partly because of the innate Frenchness of the story.’
    • ‘All of these hallmarks of the American dream are a powerful draw.’
    • ‘Celtic are a famous club and will be an attractive draw for our fans.’
    • ‘Luck of the Irish perhaps, but it is a powerful draw.’
    • ‘To say that fantasy movies have not been a big draw at the box office is to understate the matter.’
    • ‘Documentaries aren't as big a draw as feature films or made-for-TV movies.’
    attraction, lure, allure, pull, appeal, glamour, allurement, enticement, temptation, bewitchment, enchantment, charm, seduction, persuasion, fascination, magnetism
    View synonyms
  • 4An act of removing a gun from its holster in order to shoot.

    • ‘A post or an undercut front sight may snag on the bottom of the holster loop during your draw.’
    • ‘His draw was so maniacally quick that he actually eliminated his targets before they could completely come into view.’
    • ‘It doesn't know about quick draws, ropes or stoned partners.’
    • ‘The K339 is an adjustable tension holster with a straight-up draw that provides fast access to a firearm.’
    • ‘It can also make your draw from holster or pocket a little more difficult as fabric tends to cling to the rubber stocks.’
    • ‘It's because when I was working with the police, that was a - what I call a quick draw, just like that.’
    • ‘He does not say why he spun toward Bauthues, his hand flashing upward like the quick draw of a pistol.’
    • ‘But you can get a full hand grip with the gun entirely in the holster so the draw is smooth and virtually effortless.’
  • 5Golf
    A shot causing the ball to deviate to the left (or, for a left-handed golfer, the right).

    • ‘Practice a variety of shots on the range - knock-downs, high shots, fades, draws, sand shots, etc.’
    • ‘In effect, this closes the clubface slightly and allows you to hit straight shots or draws.’
    • ‘Though this drill is normally used to help cure the slice swing of a beginner, it can help a good player make the switch from fading the ball to hitting a draw.’
    • ‘Ideally, the grip you feel now should produce a straight shot or slight draw.’
    • ‘But after just a couple of swings, I started nailing the ball with a high draw.’
    1. 5.1Billiards Backspin imparted to a cue ball, causing it to move backwards after hitting an object ball.
      • ‘These are the nine ball snap draws, force follows, three rail shape, etc. that we see Johnny Archer shoot.’
      • ‘Since they weigh ‘too much’ they want to follow every shot, and draw is very difficult.’
      • ‘I might also choose to use spin throw with bottom in order to hit the ball fuller for tighter draw.’
  • 6An act of inhaling smoke from a cigarette or cigar.

    ‘superb cigars offering tons of peppery smoke on each draw’
    • ‘She lifted the cigar to her lips and took a draw, turning her head over to look at him and exhaling the smoke.’

Phrases

  • draw blood

    • Cause someone to bleed, especially in the course of a fight.

      ‘the blow drew blood from the corner of his mouth’
      figurative ‘she knew she'd drawn blood when the smile faded from his face’
      • ‘But nobody would really want to fight if a vampire draws blood with no malice.’
      • ‘They never go down without a fight and today, at last, they drew blood.’
      • ‘On a bad day, Barney might get into a fight with another dog, growling and scratching and fighting and trying to draw blood.’
      • ‘But I think they were really disappointed that nobody drew blood.’
      • ‘The bat drew blood, he said, but the bite was quick and small, so Jeanna thought she had just been scratched.’
      • ‘Of course since I was stitching after so long I drew blood and then I realized that I had forgotten all about the thimble once again.’
      • ‘Obsessed with southern gothic, he wrote songs in which the six-gun in his hand went crazy, his crown of thorns drew blood and Mary's cold bones were dragged through the swamp to the hell-mouth.’
      • ‘When at last the fish appeared, its scales seemed rough as alligator hide. The gill covers were hard as bone, the smooth curves of their sides met in a point that drew blood from a hurried finger as I unhooked him.’
      • ‘Others were as coarse as sandpaper, and while they stayed knotted you usually drew blood when you tied one on.’
      • ‘This time, her blow drew blood from the monster.’
  • draw fire

    • Attract hostile criticism away from a more important target.

      ‘the vaccination campaign continued to draw fire’
      • ‘I'll rush out of the building, and draw their fire…’
      • ‘The comments regarding the subordination of women in First Corinthians, Ephesians and Timothy were points which easily drew my fire.’
      • ‘We will draw their fire, and you can follow us at your will.’
      • ‘Word is they know our plans and the General has a gambit to draw their fire before they can use that knowledge against us.’
      • ‘Jewel then charges alongside the buffet, finally attracting the soldiers' attention and drawing their fire.’
      • ‘Inside he can see Mai continually drawing his fire.’
      • ‘We need to draw their fire away so that one of us can at least take one of them out!’
      • ‘Three more ninjas attack Chuck War, drawing his fire away from Battle Armor Bob.’
      • ‘She's going to try to draw their fire, make them think all of us are over there, so we should be fine here for the time being.’
      • ‘If he's not, the fighters need to charge in and draw his fire.’
  • quick on the draw

    • 1Very fast in taking one's gun from its holster.

      • ‘Trench, ever quick on the draw, drew a shotgun out of his trench-coat and quickly pointed it at the abomination in their midst.’
      • ‘The worst corporate bandits are still likely to face a sheriff who's quick on the draw.’
      • ‘The tourists who lost their lives were just two in thousands; the policeman, a bit quick on the draw, no doubt and on the trigger too, was acting in defense of his own daughter and over-reacted, but can he really be blamed?’
      1. 1.1Very fast in acting or reacting.
        • ‘You've got to be very quick on the draw, because a horse can stumble leaving the gate, and you got plan A. All of a sudden, because of the break or the bad break, you have to go to plan B, and you've got to be able to adjust very quickly.’
        • ‘Whether a suitable retort from a Scottish nationalist would be the nodding of his head, or whether he would be quicker on the draw with two fingers might be a moot point.’
        • ‘Eddie's hip, raw, and quick on the draw in his routine, meshing together the best of real life and news into a topical and funny performance.’
        • ‘I'm surprised the conclusion was not that docs should be quicker on the draw so there would be no time for second thoughts.’
        • ‘He obviously learned from past mistakes when he was too quick on the draw in dismissing three former senators.’
        • ‘The local sheriff's office was not exactly quick on the draw and so nothing was done.’
        • ‘Many denunciations were defensive; there was a feeling that one had to be quick on the draw to survive.’
        • ‘If that is so, let's hope that the Western world is quicker on the draw than North Korea or Iran.’
        • ‘He is friendly, enthusiastic and extremely quick on the draw, with a deep, booming voice.’
        • ‘Experience and necessity - so many books, so little time - have made Ms. Hensley quick on the draw.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • draw back

    • Choose not to do something that one was expected to do.

      ‘the government has drawn back from attempting reform’
      • ‘I've been planning it, then drawing back from it, getting excited, then getting cold feet, but I finally handed in my resignation at work yesterday.’
      • ‘It is good that he tends to draw back in the end, but it would be even better if he didn't pander to his readers' prejudices in the first place.’
      • ‘It draws back from the frenzied pursuit of marketing novelties and technological turnover and assumes the measured pace of humane and sustainable values.’
      • ‘The source also signalled that the party was drawing back on its old commitment to abolish Yorkshire Forward and other English regional development agencies set up by Mr Prescott.’
      • ‘The genial married priest, who has six children, draws back from calling the people of the area pagans and denies he came from Uganda to convert.’
      • ‘I will draw back from recording a death from natural causes and record an open verdict.’
      • ‘Both companies looked at floating two years ago but drew back in the face of falling share prices.’
      • ‘But it is time now to draw back from treating him as a public spectacle and let him fight his demons out of the public eye.’
      • ‘The danger comes from the fact that it has been easy to intervene; to draw back once an intervention has been proven foolish is much more difficult.’
      • ‘He seems to be drawing back from intervention, with some in his administration allegedly questioning whether the USA should be involved at all.’
      withdraw, retire, pull back, pull out, fall back, give way, give ground, recoil, flee, take flight, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, run away, run off, make a run for it, run for it, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, make a quick exit, clear out, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills
      View synonyms
  • draw something down

    • 1Reduce the size of a military force in an area.

      ‘more had to be done before the US could begin to draw down its forces in any significant number’
      ‘we need to start letting them stand on their own feet, and that isn't going to happen until we start drawing down’
      • ‘As the United States military involvement here draws down, so, too, does their influence.’
      • ‘Of course, it should be remembered that the Pentagon has wanted to draw down its troop numbers radically in the past.’
      • ‘The British were already planning to draw down their troops from 9,000 to 2,000 in the next nine months.’
      • ‘Unless there is a political resolution of the problem, as American forces draw down, the pot could well start to bubble up again.’
      • ‘It is an odd army that responds to attack by drawing down its forces, but that is exactly what has been happening.’
      • ‘He has announced he will start drawing down the 3,000 Italian troops in September.’
      • ‘This has nothing to do with drawing down the American military presence overall in that part of the world, does it?’
      • ‘The administration has little choice but to start drawing down troop strength, starting next spring.’
      • ‘We want to draw down our forces, but the President is prepared to tough this one out.’
      • ‘The military is forcing them to draw down, and they probably will for practical and domestic political reasons.’
      • ‘We are going to devote more and more troops to getting their security forces "trained and ready", such that we can draw down our forces and hand over the country.’
      • ‘If we draw down, do you promise to keep the peace?’
      • ‘Before the war they expected to draw down troop levels to around 30,000 by now.’
      • ‘Would it have made a difference if the UN had stayed longer, if we had not drawn down our forces too quickly?’
      • ‘When is the U.S. military going to be able to begin drawing down its forces and bringing them home?’
      • ‘So, you expect that things will be stable, if we draw down.’
      • ‘Hungary has already decamped, and Holland, the Ukraine, Poland and others are drawing down their troops or leaving altogether.’
      • ‘The flag of 20 Armoured Brigade will be lowered as British combat patrols come to an end and our armed forces prepare to draw down.’
      • ‘The United States has several time tables to draw down troop strength.’
      • ‘There are good reasons to fund the country's experiment in democracy, even as the U.S. draws down its military forces there.’
      1. 1.1Withdraw money from a fund or loan facility.
        ‘I'm not actually going to be drawing down any of the loan until early 1999’
        ‘she would have to draw down on her $253,000 investments at a rate of 7.2 per cent’
        • ‘The company has drawn down $5.3 billion of its $7 billion bank credit line.’
        • ‘Once approved you must then ensure that you draw down the grant at the earliest possible opportunity.’
        • ‘Upon retirement, an individual is entitled to draw down 25 per cent of the value of the trust fund without incurring a tax charge.’
        • ‘Some 70 million baby boomers will soon draw down trillions in government payments.’
        • ‘As domestic savings have been drawn down to virtually nothing, the US has looked abroad for capital.’
        • ‘The retirement of the baby boom generation is closer - we will soon be drawing down those surpluses in Social Security and Medicare.’
        • ‘You can still take the traditional route and, having drawn down your 25 per cent tax free lump sum, simply invest in an annuity.’
        • ‘You can't draw down 18% a year from your investment account and expect it to last.’
        • ‘Not only are the gains and income of a pension fund untaxed until drawn down, contributions to the fund are also tax-deductible.’
        • ‘In some industrial and construction loans the amount lent may be drawn down by the borrower in instalments within an agreed period.’
        • ‘As a single guy, he was able to live frugally, drawing down his personal savings to fund the necessities: rent on a small one-bedroom apartment, groceries, electricity.’
        • ‘Each policy remains in force until it is drawn down at retirement age.’
        • ‘With most personal loans, you make your first repayment one month after you draw down your loan.’
        • ‘Your rate will be fixed on the day that your mortgage is drawn down.’
        • ‘States have resorted to every available measure to cover their expenses, including tax increases, service cuts, and drawing down reserves.’
        • ‘With his wife still working, the husband shouldn't have to draw down all his retirement stash.’
        • ‘Despite pessimists' fears, the U.S. is not drawing down national wealth to pay for imports.’
        • ‘What's more, you can draw down your pension in stages, allowing it to start small and build up over time.’
        • ‘If a first-time buyer is having great difficulty saving the 10 per cent deposit that is required to draw down a mortgage, one option to consider is a 95 per cent loan.’
        • ‘An aging population meant fewer workers were paying into the system, while more elderly people were drawing down pensions.’
      2. 1.2Withdraw water, oil, or gas from a reservoir or repository.
        ‘the state began drawing down some of its stored water’
        • ‘Our state's reservoirs and soil profiles were drawn down this summer.’
        • ‘Adding to this gloomy scenario is the fact that reservoirs in northeastern Colorado have been drawn down substantially.’
        • ‘The only reason we can get away with our impact on the planet is there are still stocks of forests, fish, soils and water to draw down.’
        • ‘Fossil fuel is a finite energy source, and we are perilously close to drawing down all known oil and gas reserves to the point that production can no longer meet demand.’
        • ‘A growing population means more wells drawing down water supplies.’
        • ‘Geologist David Bainbridge of Alliant International University also points out that there are scant few penalties against users who draw down water tables or deplete aquifers.’
        • ‘They do not draw down water levels in the stream significantly within a single growing season.’
        • ‘Making matters worse for jittery oil traders is the growing suspicion that the major oil fields are being drawn down prematurely by secondary extraction techniques, like water injection.’
        • ‘This enormous demand must of course draw down the water on that short line of canal, render it shallow, and its navigation impracticable.’
        • ‘Oil consumption by modern industrial society will draw down current and potential supplies in a predictable way.’
        • ‘California has already surpassed its water allotment and has begun drawing down water levels from reservoirs along the river.’
        • ‘The world is drawing down its oil reserves at an unprecedented rate.’
        • ‘We have to be careful about drawing down resources, processing, using, and recycling them.’
        • ‘Most notably, recent complex maneuverings to help California find more water mean that the reservoirs behind the river's dams have been drawn down under a revised definition of "surplus criteria."’
  • draw on

    • (of a period of time) pass by and approach its end.

      ‘he remembered sitting in silence with his grandmother as evening drew on’
      • ‘The afternoon came and went; night drew on; few cars passed; none stopped.’
      • ‘The evening drew on, the bats came out, and when the light faded to the point where I couldn't read another word, we repaired to the kitchen where I snapped on the lights.’
      • ‘She said research had shown that evenings were an area of weakness in York's tourism industry, with streets that were packed by day becoming empty as evening drew on.’
      • ‘As the evening draws on, the place becomes a pulsating, frenzied dance area, with everyone shaking their carefully honed south beach tush.’
      • ‘Evening was drawing on and we were nearing the twilight zone, the night sacred to Shiva, between the waxing and waning moons, when time is arrested between past and future, when the mind is suspended in no-man's-land.’
  • draw something on

    • Put an item of clothing on.

      ‘she drew on her gloves’
  • draw someone out

    • Gently or subtly persuade someone to talk or become more expansive.

      ‘she drew me out and flattered me’
      • ‘We always have a problem drawing him out, but we keep inviting him back.’
      • ‘Delia's final summary: ‘The sessions have been very motivating and positive and Susan and I were on the same wavelength; she made me relaxed and drew me out well.’’
      • ‘But Hill drew him out, helped him clarify his clichés and energise his anecdotes.’
      • ‘I don't think there was any problem in drawing Kirk out about any of his dalliances, his affairs.’
      • ‘The real question is, what will happen if Paul Bremer draws him out on his approach to democracy?’
      • ‘Millar draws him out on the concept of reconciliation.’
      • ‘And during that time, Bhima transforms Tim's life, drawing him out, teaching him to be a father.’
      • ‘If he said exactly the same thing in a dozen interviews, it was an indication that reporters were all asking the same questions, and then not drawing him out enough.’
      • ‘‘Mary has been very good with her, drawing her out of herself and making sure she doesn't just hide away in the bedroom,’ she said.’
      • ‘She could never, however, draw Gonzales out on what Juan's secret occupation was.’
      encourage someone to talk, get someone to talk, persuade someone to talk, put someone at their ease
      View synonyms
  • draw something out

    • Make something last longer.

      ‘the transition was long drawn out’
      • ‘And, like the pretty girl trying to decide who to go to the Prom with, he is drawing his decision out.’
      • ‘Far too many shots are drawn out too lengthily and his selection of long shot vs. medium shot vs. close-up is questionable.’
      • ‘The account of a Christmas dinner chez Bucks, for example, is brilliantly executed but the agony is drawn out until it's unbearable, until you're made to feel unwelcome.’
      • ‘His presentation was too complicated, his menus were drawn out and his plate composition was fussy.’
      • ‘With each retelling, he draws the silences out a little further and intones each word more forcefully.’
      • ‘With a blatancy typical of the man, it takes a 27-bar ‘matrix’ for violins and woodwind and draws it out, seamlessly, virtuosically, for nearly half an hour.’
      • ‘With only three songs under 4: 30, the ten tracks are drawn out.’
      • ‘Thats what's bad, you know she's gonna do it, and it draws it out, that was a real ‘watch through the fingers’ moment, more due to the anticipation than else.’
      • ‘You didn't just let go of her hand either mate, you drew it out as though you were being pulled away from the love of your life.’
      • ‘It may not prove possible to reach agreement by the close of the meeting, in which case negotiations could be drawn out until next spring.’
      prolong, protract, drag out, stretch out, spin out, string out, make something go on and on, extend, extend the duration of, lengthen, carry on, keep going, keep alive, continue
      View synonyms
  • draw up

    • Come to a halt.

      ‘drivers drew up at the lights’
      • ‘Indeed, the bus drew up to my alighting stop when I was just ten metres from it.’
      • ‘A few hours later, just as Bob and his family were coming home from the cinema, Granny's taxi drew up outside the house.’
      • ‘The driver had approached Bob after they drew up at traffic lights on Broadway, Chadderton.’
      • ‘Upon their return they were marched along Broughton Road and drew up outside the Town Hall before being dismissed.’
      • ‘As he approached Ashdon Way in Basildon he drew up at a bus stop where he saw a young man.’
      • ‘As you drew up in front of the palace, at a sign from the major domo, the band would play God Save the Nizam and God Save the King Emperor.’
      • ‘As we taxied to a halt, a car drew up to the plane's steps to take us home through mundane rush-hour traffic.’
      • ‘They turned into the gravelled main street and drew up at the petrol pumps.’
      • ‘They stood together and waved to everyone on departure and then parted, only coming together as they drew up to Richmond.’
      • ‘The man drew up close to her while both were riding in the same direction, and reached out and touched her inappropriately.’
      stop, pull up, come to a halt, come to a stop, halt, come to a standstill, brake, park, arrive
      View synonyms
  • draw something up

    • Prepare a plan, proposal, agreement, or other document in detail.

      ‘they instructed an attorney to draw up a sales agreement’
      • ‘Detailed plans will be drawn up for the introduction of coaching for non golfers and it is hoped to introduce the scheme through the primary schools both North and South during the next school year.’
      • ‘But if the proposal went down well, more detailed plans could be drawn up and applications for lottery and other funding begun.’
      • ‘But under new planning legislation consultation with the public now begins at an earlier stage before the draft plan has been drawn up.’
      • ‘It can't be beyond the wit of those concerned to arrive at a point where Connecting the City is underway and the demolition and clearance are in progress while new detailed plans are drawn up that will keep everybody happy.’
      • ‘Infuriatingly, they won't give any indication as to whether a plan will be approved until it has been drawn up in full detail, which means spending thousands on drawings that will probably be binned.’
      • ‘Although the original document was drawn up more than 200 years ago, it still provides the basic rules and establishes the basic institutional structures through which politics is practised.’
      • ‘Detailed plans will be drawn up and people will be given a chance to comment before the area committee gives the final go-ahead.’
      • ‘‘Open and constructive discussions have already been held with our colleagues in Leeds about this scheme, and these will continue as more detailed plans are drawn up,’ he said.’
      • ‘Detailed plans will be drawn up over the next few months after people are consulted on what they would like to see in the building.’
      • ‘This has been mentioned previously and although a draft agreement was drawn up, it was not signed by the Trust.’
      compose, formulate, frame, write out, write down, put in writing, put down, put down on paper, draft, prepare, think up, devise, work out, map out, plan, conceive, create, invent, originate, coin, design
      arrange, marshal, muster, assemble, group, order, range, rank, line up, parade, place, dispose, position, put into position, set out, array, set forth
      View synonyms
  • draw oneself up

    • Make oneself stand in a stiffly upright manner.

      ‘Sarah drew herself up, full of indignation that he should presume to judge her’
      • ‘When I say I will, she draws herself up, full of dignity and straight as the stick she is carrying.’
      • ‘The prince drew himself up, nostrils flaring as if he was going to say something.’
      • ‘He self-consciously drew himself up, and went out to stand in the entrance way.’
      • ‘George's eyes grew very upset and he drew himself up stiffly.’
      • ‘And the woman draws herself up and delivers a stirring dialogue on her right to stay there and earn an honest living.’
      • ‘She drew herself up into a deeply sullen huff of feline dignity and took herself off to the farthest corner of the patio.’
      • ‘He grabbed her by the hair and started to drag her away, but I stood up, drawing myself up to my full height.’
      • ‘He stood up slowly, drawing himself up to his full and dignified height.’
      • ‘Not being accustomed to being given that sort of look by a public servant, I drew myself up to my full height.’
      • ‘And then I self-consciously drew myself up and stood, a little embarrassed at being in a compromising position.’

Origin

Old English dragan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dragen and German tragen, also to draught.

Pronunciation

draw

/drô//drɔ/