Definition of downtime in English:

downtime

(also down time)

noun

  • 1Time during which a machine, especially a computer, is out of action or unavailable for use.

    • ‘The job of keeping down time to a minimum falls to the system administrator.’
    • ‘Data mirroring from disk-to-disk can allow for minimum down time of seconds compared to minutes or hours when restoring from tape.’
    • ‘Unfortunately because they target infrastructure, non-infected computers can still be affected through Internet down time.’
    • ‘Today's business does not allow for down time due to IT failure, maintenance or any other reason.’
    • ‘Primary amongst these are the ability to support non-disruptive operations and significantly reduce, or eliminate, the need for down time, coupled with efficient storage management.’
    • ‘Previously, talk in the industry centered on the cost of down time and the hundreds of thousands, and even millions, of dollars per hour that were lost.’
    • ‘The rectifiers are fully redundant and hot pluggable for replacement or maintenance without any down time.’
    • ‘There were no bugs, no down time, no incident whatsoever aside from a few hours of lag which were quickly dealt with by the live team.’
    • ‘With only a few minor adjustments to the clients, the students experienced only about 40 minutes of down time.’
    • ‘In fact, if they can do it quickly during down time it may be a ‘refresher’ that lets them be more productive the rest of the time.’
    • ‘For example, in the event of an outage, replication of content would allow an organization whose local IT resources no longer function to quickly access data at the remote site with virtually no down time.’
    • ‘In those twelve months of operation, we have had absolutely no down time due to the Linux operating system.’
    • ‘Additionally, such an approach typically requires periodic reassessment and rebalancing of the storage resources - often accompanied by system down time.’
    • ‘This self-study course is ideal for any home computer user, students in grades 8 and up or any business person who wants to make sure that the down time for their computers is kept at a minimum.’
    • ‘The cost of such a solution is justified by the cost to the business of even a few minutes of down time.’
    • ‘It is particularly attractive as a quick fix when the main network server is running out of storage space and there isn't any down time available for maintenance because a NAS device is easy to install.’
    • ‘The assembly department is reducing down time and increasing throughput by pursuing what seems to be a growing trend: de-automation.’
    • ‘With server down time costs ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars a minute, even speeding up the recovery of a failed machine by a few minutes can pay big dividends.’
    • ‘This significant restore latency results in substantial down time and lost productivity.’
    • ‘There's a lot of down time while the oil strainer cleans each pressure fryer.’
    interval, interlude, entr'acte, break, recess, pause, rest, respite, breathing space, lull, gap, stop, stoppage, halt
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American A time of reduced activity or inactivity.
      ‘everyone needs downtime to unwind’
      ‘downtimes for real estate and construction’
      • ‘Summer holidays are a great time for reading to children and it provides a perfect excuse for some midday down time, while a handful of coloured pencils, felt pens and paper provide a good hour of drawing at shaded campsite picnic tables.’
      • ‘I'm going to give it all up - job security, three months' down time, a machine that recruits itself - to stroke my ego and prove I can coach in the NFL.’
      • ‘I need a bit of down time and just right now I'm enjoying this moment with my team.’
      • ‘But the winter down time is important to meet the demands of the summer, she pointed out.’
      • ‘Facial procedures that offer little down time while giving the recipient a treatment that makes a big difference in their appearance within hours are popular among the 30 to 50 age group.’
      • ‘They also were hoping for some down time to spend some quality time with each other without children around.’
      • ‘You probably don't have much time to relax these days, but in those moments or hours in which you do, how do you spend your down time, how do you unwind so to speak?’
      • ‘You will find ACL surgery is creating much less down time for athletes these days.’
      • ‘His down time in the first month should allow him to be fresh late in the year-a significant plus as the weather turns bad and the team must depend more on its power game.’
      • ‘He seems to recover well with some down time and some renewed attention to his mechanics, but without knowing what the MRIs have shown, we can only guess that there's some damage inside the arm.’
      • ‘I'll be back, hopefully with something to say (and enough down time during the work day to say it) on Monday.’
      • ‘I was a VM systems programmer from 1992 to 1994; during that time, we typically had under an hour of scheduled down time a year.’
      • ‘I gave the example that on the current provision of 3 weeks' annual leave, and other entitlements, the actual down time is about 280 hours.’
      • ‘You don't even pay for lunch breaks, coffee breaks, overtime or any sort of down time - you pay for the seconds that your VA is at his/her desk and entirely concentrated on your work.’
      • ‘‘Specifically, juggling the demands of a busy career with the need for some down time and my love of vacations-as anyone who knows me knows,’ she says.’
      • ‘He said proudly, ‘I had two days down time in eight years.’’
      • ‘Daily, weekly, or seasonal projections can be made on the basis of historical demand so that both down time and overtime are minimized.’
      • ‘Camp counselors notice that homesickness tends to worsen when a child has down time - during early morning, rest hour, and just before bed, for example - and that it can be contagious.’
      • ‘The longer winter break does mean more down time for students without jobs, but provides more earning time for students who find employment.’
      • ‘He's soon leading a double life, stalking his latest assignment while dancing in whatever down time he can find.’

Pronunciation:

downtime

/ˈdounˌtīm/