Definition of double effect in English:

double effect

noun

  • (in ethics) the good and bad effect of an action, compared according to a principle that seeks to justify the action if the bad effect, though foreseen, is outweighed by the good effect.

    • ‘If we accept the principle of double effect, we would have to agree that this defence works.’
    • ‘Particularly in issues in medical ethics, using the principle of double effect seems easier than the search for applicable premoral values.’
    • ‘This is called the doctrine of double effect.’
    • ‘But the principle of double effect also covers cases when the harm is foreseen.’
    • ‘There is always a fine line with the principle of double effect that demands integrity from the caregiver.’
    • ‘This concept, referred to by the theorists as the concept of double effect, leads to discussion of the concept of proportionality.’
    • ‘In what circumstances does the doctrine, rule, or principle of double effect apply?’
    • ‘The intentions of the actors, appealed to in the frequently deployed but fallacious doctrine of double effect are not here relevant.’
    • ‘This is sometimes called the doctrine of double effect, whereby a good primary motive is seen to outweigh an undesirable, but known, secondary result.’
    • ‘The double effect of these phenomena could well short-circuit cumulative recovery dynamics and render current US economic strength short-lived, which could well also impact on the bullish case for commodities.’
    • ‘This double effect of the simulacrum is essential.’
    • ‘According to the doctrine of double effect, then, the first is ethical, while the second is not.’
    • ‘One must honour the principle of discrimination - specifically of noncombatant immunity, although the principle of double effect allows, ominously, for some ‘collateral’ killing of noncombatants.’
    • ‘First, it is a misinterpretation to claim that the principle of double effect shows that agents may permissibly bring about harmful effects provided that they are merely foreseen side effects of promoting a good end.’
    • ‘This argues that the principle of double effect is not only illogical, but is self-deceptive, allowing people, by a moral sleight-of-hand, to do things they would otherwise consider wrong.’
    • ‘Whatever its merits, the doctrine of double effect is quite separate from the claim that we are not responsible for the results of our omissions.’
    • ‘This is another example of our old friend, the law of double effect.’