Definition of dottiness in US English:

dottiness

noun

British
informal
  • See dotty

    • ‘He evidently conceived something English in his dottiness; he is described as ‘un vrai gentleman ‘and there are Anglophile touches such as holidaymakers crowding to get the latest Daily Telegraph.’’
    • ‘But this verdict, arrived at by the 600 experts, contains the same level of dottiness at play in all the other crass errors of judgement on the list.’
    • ‘Wonderland's dottiness is infinitely more suited to theatre than the determinism of the Looking-Glass world.’
    • ‘Even California can't compete with this kind of dottiness.’
    • ‘And on Broadway in the 1930s there was a belief that dottiness was a token of individuality: the most famous example was You Can't Take it with You, which gaudily celebrated family wackiness.’
    • ‘That said, there is a dottiness about the proceedings which involves lots of beautifully textured visuals using an overhead projector, shadow play and live musical accompaniment.’
    • ‘I had hopes that she would develop her twin strains of doughtiness and dottiness and become a thorn in the flesh.’
    • ‘This girl gave off the distinct sensation of dottiness.’
    • ‘Amanda is played as a rather ditsy daughter of Australia's haute bourgeoisie by Wynter, who brings a glacial dottiness to the role.’
    • ‘But maybe public life needs more, not less, of this kind of politically incorrect dottiness - if only to liven it up a bit.’

Pronunciation

dottiness

/ˈdädēnəs//ˈdɑdinəs/