Main definitions of dot in English

: dot1dot2DOT3

dot1

noun

  • 1A small round mark or spot.

    ‘a symbol depicted in colored dots’
    • ‘These also serve well as night sights with three tritium round dots, one on each side of the rear notch and one in the face of the front sight.’
    • ‘Place the item flat on a work surface and mark a dot at the embroidery center.’
    • ‘Gray dots on the colored lines show estimated positions of QTL peaks.’
    • ‘Ruh verified this by showing me her arms which were almost completely spotted with red dots.’
    • ‘Other colored dots and lines deliver additional data used in controlling the aircraft.’
    • ‘Mark the point that these two lines intersect with a piece of tape or a round dot.’
    • ‘First, the scientists used dots to mark near points and far points.’
    • ‘Experts also suggest to pay attention to the color spots and dots on your tires.’
    • ‘Stanislav Nikirev uses millions of pencil dots on paper to depict the temple.’
    • ‘The six green arrows point to the same spot on each of six light-traces; those marked with a blue dot are very faint, and need close examination to be seen.’
    • ‘You can look at the social atlas of Sydney and see twelve bright red dots on the map.’
    • ‘They can pull up a map of the area and see friendlies on it as colored dots.’
    • ‘Then suddenly the dot would disappear, and the task would change: now participants had to identify the spot where the dot disappeared.’
    • ‘To identify the focal male in each dyad, each randomly selected competitor was marked with a dot of white paint the evening prior to the trials.’
    • ‘But then I look at the book more closely and spot the raised dots of Braille.’
    • ‘Cells marked with similar colored dots moved collectively in the same direction forming domain-like structures on the collagen gel.’
    • ‘Identical amino acids are denoted by asterisks, and conservative changes are marked by dots.’
    • ‘I assume the ridges and dots marking the stones are designed to warn the pedestrian of upcoming hazards such as intersections and obstacles.’
    • ‘The line shows the spectral boundary which is obtained by connecting the loci of spectral lights, marked by the dots in steps of 10 nm.’
    • ‘Transfer any construction marks - notches, dots, etc. - to the garment pieces.’
    spot, speck, fleck, speckle, point, pinpoint, pinprick, mark, dab
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A dot written or printed as part of an i or j, as a diacritical mark, as one of a series of marks to signify omission, or as a period.
      • ‘The other two have a few sentences that trail off with a series of dots.’
      • ‘Then your application will be buff and strong and it will laugh in the face of wimpy problems like people who use commas instead of dots as the decimal.’
      • ‘This dedication contains 144 letters and is oddly written with dots between each letter.’
      • ‘A dot written under a vowel means that the word should be pronounced with a voice that starts low, drops a little bit lower, and is then cut off abruptly.’
      • ‘There is, however, a range of diacritical usage in or related to English, including two everyday marks with diacritical properties: the dot and the apostrophe.’
      • ‘Mr. Luxenberg explains these copies are written without vowels and diacritical dots that modern Arabic uses to make it clear what letter is intended.’
      spot, speck, fleck, speckle, point, pinpoint, pinprick, mark, dab
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Music A dot used to denote the lengthening of a note or rest by half, or to indicate staccato.
      • ‘Portato is indicated by a short line over or under a note, or the combination of a slur and staccato dot.’
      • ‘A dot after a note ordinarily meant that it was half as long again as its normal value, but otherwise it simply signified that the notes on either side were irregular in some way. 5.’
      • ‘A dotted half note has a dot behind it to make it three beats not two beats.’
      • ‘In 20th-century notation the staccato is generally prescribed by means of a dot over or under the note and is distinguished from the more emphatic staccatissimo, indicated by a wedge.’
      • ‘Does it have a second dot or a rest after the first?’
    3. 1.3 The shorter signal of the two used in Morse code.
      Compare with dash (sense 3 of the noun)
      • ‘Today, when we think of telegraphs we think of electric telegraphs, we think of wires and Morse code and dots and dashes and telegrams and that sort of thing.’
      • ‘Morse Code uses a series of dots and dashes to transmit and receive messages.’
      • ‘People often speak or write Morse code using words ‘Dit’ (or Di) for a dot and ‘Dah’ for a dash.’
      • ‘Perhaps the most famous coding is Morse Code, which converts letters of the alphabet into series of dots and dashes.’
      • ‘Tapping out dots and dashes can sometimes be easier for people with physical or speech impediments.’
    4. 1.4 Used to refer to an object that appears tiny because it is far away.
      ‘the desert shrank figures to mere dots’
      • ‘People appeared as tiny black dots in the grainy, blurred footage, and there seem to be about two dozen in the alley, although it is difficult to determine the exact number.’
      • ‘Tiny dots on the horizon testified that the other fishermen were still hauling in the catch out there.’
      • ‘Nosing through the wispy clouds, I had serious misgivings about the tiny dot of an island, with a silhouette resembling a well-chewed apple core.’
      • ‘Just five miles wide and orbiting the sun between Mars and Jupiter, the minor planet, now called Ianmorison, is visible only as a tiny dot of light.’
      • ‘The brightest planet in the sky will appear as a black dot moving across the surface of the sun.’
      • ‘It was still a tiny dot on the horizon, barely distinguishable from the snow flurries around him, but he knew where he was going and the lack of a clear destination didn't bother him.’
      • ‘A soft wavering dot appeared on the horizon, which Barth watched intently.’
      • ‘He is first seen in Lawrence as a tiny dot on a desert horizon that shimmers in the heat; he gradually becomes more distinct as he nears the camera.’
      • ‘The horizon stretched for miles unblemished, save for a tiny dot that got bigger and bigger as the car advanced.’
      • ‘The forest all along the mountain curve was spotted with dots of red, yellow, purple and gold, trees just beginning to turn with the season.’
      • ‘Finally, tiny dots of campfires appeared in the distance.’
      • ‘In comparison to Tuin, Pigeon really was remote, the tiniest of dots in a vast ocean.’
      • ‘Across a vast white expanse a single figure appears as a dot on the horizon.’
      • ‘Against the starry backdrop about a dozen or so tiny, cone-like dots appeared, and buzzed around the wreckage.’
      • ‘Venus, the third-brightest object in the sky, will take six hours to cross the bottom of the sun, appearing as a black dot against the solar disc.’
      • ‘She had seen it from afar, a mere dot upon the horizon, but now she was at the foot of it and it was taller than anything imaginable.’
      • ‘After all people appear as mere dots on the pavement.’
      • ‘Ashill, the picturesque east Devon village where Stone lives, is easy to overlook: a tiny dot on the map, west of the M5.’
      • ‘Clusters of bluebells sway in the breeze, and here and there you spot dark pink dots of vetch.’
      • ‘Our horses are tiny dots making their way up a thin ridge.’
    5. 1.5 Used to indicate the punctuation separating parts of an email or website address.
      ‘drop me a note at heatvision dot com’
      • ‘You can also read Palast's entire column over at the Common Dreams dot org if you'd like.’
      • ‘Domain names have at least two parts, separated by a dot or period.’
      • ‘I don't know if you know this part but we're doing this for a Web site called Blogcritics dot org and if you come to Phoenix probably for my paper.’
      • ‘TLDs are the distinctive letters that follow the dot in Internet addresses, such as corn, net, or org.’
      • ‘I have an interview with a start up dot com.’
      • ‘Additions or corrections can be sent to joel at danwei dot org.’
      • ‘Email me at greg at greg dot org with your suggestions.’
      • ‘Send me your recommendations by making this a real email address: rebecca at rebecca dot net.’
      • ‘His site is Friends of Cayman dot org, a site dedicated to the repair and reconstruction of badly damaged homes on Grand Cayman.’
      • ‘Oh where oh where could MoveOn dot org have gotten such outrageous and unthinkable notions!’
      • ‘Another time I wasn't redirected, so I was on the US based regular straight-up dot org site.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Mark with a small spot or spots.

    ‘wet spots of rain began to dot his shirt’
    • ‘As stars began to appear and dot the night sky, she decided to take up her books and move to the Library.’
    • ‘Hypericum's leaves are dotted with translucent spots, making it appear perforated.’
    • ‘The twist-up pencil point lets you dot concealer exactly on the spot without hitting the surrounding skin.’
    • ‘By six the predicted rain began to dot the windows.’
    • ‘She thought about this as stars began to dot the darkening sky.’
    • ‘All around the globe, they are beginning to dot the land and the sea.’
    • ‘The film exhibits some nasty damage and smearing in places, showing far more of its age than one should reasonably expect, with white flecks and odd watermarks dotting the transfer.’
    • ‘Her face was dotted with faint freckles and she wore a pale pink blush over the faded spots.’
    • ‘Freckles dotted her complexion, and her posture and carriage were beautiful from years of dancing.’
    • ‘After a brief struggle, we got some concealer on his face to cover up the freckles that dotted his nose.’
    • ‘The carpet was probably once an off white color, but now it was gray and dotted with mysterious brown spots.’
    • ‘Patches of blue slowly began to dot the gray sky.’
    • ‘Tiny freckles dotted her upper cheeks and her nose.’
    • ‘Younger, newer roots are dotted with small reddish-brown spots.’
    • ‘The old, washed-out white tents began to dot the promenade like the annoying blight on my ixora plants.’
    • ‘He could count each and every freckle that dotted her nose.’
    • ‘As the sun sinks lower into the abyss, the sea and sky soften to a dark wine, stars begin to dot the heavens, and black waves crash onto the shore, the scent of salt and evening flowers heavy in the air.’
    • ‘To camouflage spots, dip a clean cotton bud into a concealer that matches your skin tone and dot on the spot.’
    • ‘He also noticed the small and barely visible freckles that dotted the bridge of her nose.’
    • ‘Some bits of plaster from the ceiling dots the shirt and her hair.’
    spot, fleck, bespeckle, mark, dab, stipple, pock, freckle, sprinkle, dust
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a number of items) be scattered over (an area)
      ‘churches dot the countryside’
      • ‘Termite mounds dot the roadside, rising in vertical shafts to tapering points, each one a tiny architectural marvel, a many-towered Camelot.’
      • ‘His heartland is the west of Scotland, particularly Glasgow, which is dotted with his Ashoka restaurants like a tablecloth flecked in korma sauce.’
      • ‘Heaps of bananas, pumpkins, ash and snake gourds, cucumber, bitter gourd and brinjal dotted the market area.’
      • ‘As you make your way west of Funchal and into the countryside, the landscape changes and the area is dotted with houses that cling to the side of hills.’
      • ‘Motorists found themselves searching for spaces at spots dotted around the centre.’
      • ‘What options face the smaller churches that dot the landscape of North America?’
      • ‘Instead, I've been conducting posses of excited children around the re-opened amusement parks that dot our area.’
      • ‘The park was dotted with children in uniforms, running from pillar to post, hastily jotting down squiggles in their little notebooks.’
      • ‘The route soon turns into hairpin bends where the area is dotted with tea estates.’
      • ‘Officers will be dotted around the ground to spot known hooligans.’
      • ‘The Chesapeake Bay area is dotted with historic towns - ancient by US standards.’
      • ‘This gets more interesting if you are learning to bicycle near one of those parks that dot every residential area.’
      • ‘Various Catholic and Protestant churches dotted the area as well.’
      • ‘This can be seen in the more than 500 villas dotting the area, mostly built in a European style.’
      • ‘Step back from the looking glass and the room is dotted with knick-knacks of Australiana.’
      • ‘Evidence of campfires dot the area, obviously the ‘bushers’ like to be comfortable while indulging themselves.’
      • ‘Scattered dead and living Porites coral colonies dot these areas.’
      • ‘Some of the architectural gems are the many churches that dot the landscape.’
      • ‘A handful of gold shirts were dotted amongst the crowds as Australian fans turned out to join in the praise of Clive Woodward's squad.’
      • ‘There are also 10 disabled fishing bays, as well as a number of picnic tables dotted about the scenic area.’
      scatter, pepper, sprinkle, strew, litter
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Place a dot over (a letter)
      ‘you need to dot the i’
      • ‘She doesn't look up; I watch the pen jab the paper with each letter she dots and crosses.’
      • ‘Of course, letters of intent aren't official until head coaches dot the Is and double-cross the Ts.’
      • ‘I mainly scribbled and doodled his name in bubble letters with little hearts dotting the i's.’
      • ‘Laurie kept the smile on her face, writing back in her signature handwriting where she dotted her i's with hearts.’
      • ‘How you connect letters, how you dot the ‘i’ and cross the ‘t’ all says something about you.’
      • ‘Her handwritten letters come with the i's dotted and the t's crossed by George.’
    3. 1.3Music Mark (a note or rest) to show that the time value is increased by half.
      ‘a dotted quarter note’
      • ‘A dotted half note has a dot behind it to make it three beats not two beats.’
      • ‘Tom is still performing, taking time each day to keep up with his dotted quavers and four beat notes.’
      • ‘As discussed in the Textual Notes, below, attention needs to be given to rhythmic interpretation where dotted notes occur.’
      • ‘It contains a recurring rhythm of sixteenth, dotted sixteenth and thirty-second notes that is difficult to discern.’
      • ‘Together with the consistent use of dotted and syncopated rhythms they become hallmarks of Skalkottas's musical language.’

Phrases

  • dot the i's and cross the t's

    • informal Ensure that all details are correct.

      • ‘He also told us last week that they just needed to dot the i's and cross the t's to complete their takeover but now he's saying the creditors' meeting won't take place until at least September.’
      • ‘I still think the military procurement system needs more flexibility - but it also needs to be managed by competent staffs with the capability to dot the i's and cross the t's of their contracts.’
      • ‘She finished dotting her I's and crossing her T's and handed her teacher her paper.’
      • ‘I didn't do much at work apart from filling out my appraisal as there is pressure to dot the i's and cross the t's as redundancy stalks the office for the SEVENTH time in 3 years.’
      • ‘They tended to sue him any chance they got, so it was vital to have every I dotted and every T crossed in their notes.’
      • ‘Maybe they are so dysfunctional that Parliament has to prescribe that they dot the i's and cross the t's in whatever they have to do.’
      • ‘I reckon our copies were hardly off the press before the boys in Swindon began dotting the i's and crossing the t's on their press release announcing the lowest mortgage rate in 30 years.’
      • ‘It's important to take the time to do the research - check the facts, dot the i's and cross the t's, especially when a particular piece could end up in print.’
      • ‘We are being held up, however, while we wait for the council to dot the i's and cross the t's.’
      • ‘‘All that's left to do is dot the i's and cross the t's,’ Tuttle said.’
    • informal

      see dot
  • on the dot

    • informal Exactly on time.

      ‘he arrived on the dot at nine o'clock’
      • ‘I was very amused when the phone rang at 12 on the dot.’
      • ‘The gulls seem to have watches because they arrive here on the dot every lunchtime.’
      • ‘In the days when I did run an office I always used to encourage everyone to leave at six on the dot - I couldn't really understand what point there was in working any longer.’
      • ‘We do hear anecdotally from a lot of women that they feel less likely to be promoted because they have responsibilities outside the workplace and often have to leave on the dot of finishing time.’
      • ‘The guests were due to arrive at 6 on the dot and they had 2 and half hours to do everything.’
      • ‘We arrived on the dot of half four, when a boat was due to leave.’
      • ‘The museum opens at 2pm, and I wanted to be there on the dot.’
      • ‘He arrived right on the dot at 7.30 pm - and saw the empty seat.’
      • ‘He arrives on the dot, his tall, dark-haired, slightly rakish figure hurrying up Petergate through the crowds.’
      • ‘Last Thursday Campbell arrived as usual on the dot of 8.30.’
      precisely, exactly, sharp, prompt, to the minute, on the nail
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English dott ‘head of a boil’. The word is recorded only once in Old English, then not until the late 16th century, when it is found in the sense ‘a small lump or clot’, perhaps influenced by Dutch dot ‘a knot’. The sense ‘small mark or spot’ dates from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation

dot

/dɑt//dät/

Main definitions of dot in English

: dot1dot2DOT3

dot2

noun

archaic
  • A dowry, particularly one from which only the interest or annual income was available to the husband.

Origin

From French, from Latin dos, dot- ‘dowry’ (see dower).

Pronunciation

dot

/dɑt//dät/

Main definitions of dot in English

: dot1dot2DOT3

DOT3

  • Department of Transportation.