Main definitions of Dominican in US English:

: Dominican1Dominican2Dominican3

Dominican1

noun

  • A member of the Roman Catholic order of preaching friars founded by St. Dominic, or of a religious order for women founded on similar principles.

    • ‘Furthermore, the universities quickly became a locus of conflict between the regular clergy and the newer mendicant orders, especially the Dominicans and the Franciscans.’
    • ‘A member of the third order of the Dominicans, he had the tertiary name of Jerome, in honor of the Florentine zealot Savonarola.’
    • ‘I belong to the Order of Preachers, popularly known as ‘the Dominicans.’’
    • ‘The first recruits were drawn and mobilized through Juliana's face-to-face friends and acquaintances among the abundant population of religious women, but also monks and friars from the new order of the Dominicans.’
    • ‘One of the four main orders of friars, the Dominican s were founded in 1205 by St. Dominic, an Augustinian Canon.’
    • ‘By the 13 th century the older Benedictine monasteries had to compete with new orders such as the Dominicans and Franciscans.’
    • ‘Inglis emphasizes the importance of the Dominican preaching mission against Cathar dualism to Aquinas's treatment of the doctrines of creation, divine providence, and human virtue.’
    • ‘Realizing that Pablo might need some help, the Church sent the generals of the Dominican and Franciscan orders as his advisors.’
    • ‘For instance the Franciscans and Dominicans are known to have popularised the practice with the laity as early as the eleventh century.’
    • ‘The new mendicant orders of Franciscans and Dominicans encouraged individual piety and with it the beginnings of affective religion - the empathetic experience of Christ's Passion through private meditation and prayer.’
    • ‘Priests in the orders, e.g., Jesuits, Franciscans, Dominicans, Maryknoll, and so on, are always subject to the authority of the local bishop, but their main allegiance is to their order and its mission.’
    • ‘Jesuits, Dominicans, Franciscans, Augustinians: all competed for Arequipenan souls and built churches to stake their claim.’
    • ‘During the next century, traders from Portugal, the Netherlands, England, and Spain arrived, as did Jesuit, Dominican, and Franciscan missionaries.’
    • ‘Using intellectual arguments, the Dominicans met with some success but in the end, all that was established was a new religious order - the Dominicans - who now stood outside the Church.’
    • ‘Orders of monks and nuns multiplied over the years: Benedictines, Dominicans, Cistercians, Augustinians, Carmelites and others.’
    • ‘Christian outposts founded by Dominicans, Franciscans, and Augustinians grew into towns.’
    • ‘In 1954 he was one of the French Dominicans ordered into exile because of their support for the worker-priest experiment.’
    • ‘He is also different in that he remained for his entire life a secular cleric rather than joining a religious order such as the Dominicans or Franciscans.’
    • ‘The Dominicans and the Franciscans, in particular, introduced lay Catholics to the rhythms of apostolic life, taught them to cherish holiness in their daily work, and inspired them to perform that work perfectly for God.’
    • ‘The four most important were the Franciscans, Dominicans, Carmelites, and Augustinians.’

adjective

  • Relating to St. Dominic or the Dominicans.

    • ‘Bartolome de Las Casas, a Dominican missionary, and Gines de Sepulveda, the royal historian, argued for five days before Philip II.’
    • ‘Thomas Aquinas was a Dominican friar, and a theological giant.’
    • ‘While they await the arrival of the man's confessor, a local Dominican friar, the brothers encourage him to acknowledge and repent for his sins.’
    • ‘In 1566 Pope Pius V requested that Danti use his architect's skills to design Santa Croce, the church of the Dominican monastery at Bosco Marengo near Alessandria.’
    • ‘Mary Catharine is a cloistered Dominican nun of the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary, Summit, New Jersey.’
    • ‘Another person who urged him to act publicly was the Dominican student chaplain in Berlin.’
    • ‘The Dominican order, founded in 1216 by Saint Dominic, became noted for its scholarship.’
    • ‘The students would stay at the thirteenth-century Dominican priory while the brothers took a brief holiday; Mass would be said each day in the priory's chapter room.’
    • ‘Voragine was a Dominican friar who became Archbishop of Genoa in 1292.’
    • ‘As a Dominican priest, he should know that vengeance destroys the possibility for justice; that reconciliation is the hard, lasting work we are called to as a church community.’
    • ‘The reader is left with a sense of the deep affection and enthusiasm which Thomas still inspires in the hearts of his modem Dominican brethren.’
    • ‘A Dominican pope declared Thomas Aquinas a doctor of the church in 1568, so it was only natural that a Franciscan pope would name Saint Bonaventure a doctor two decades later.’
    • ‘When I lived in Berkeley, almost twenty years ago, I heard of a Dominican priest in neighboring Oakland.’
    • ‘More recently San Lorenzo itself and the Dominican church of Santa Maria Novella have begun charging entrance fees.’
    • ‘Lowe offers a close and careful look at the Dominican education system in which Thomas was formed, with special attention to the presence of the preaching friars at the universities in the second half of the thirteenth century.’
    • ‘Nor did ecclesiastical support for the Dominican Aristotelians end up doing Aristotle much good in the wake of Luther, Galileo, and Newton.’
    • ‘Founded in 1997 by a Dominican priest, it has developed innovative, parish-based programs to enable Catholics to discern God's call in their lives.’
    • ‘Thanks to my Dominican priests at Blessed Sacrament for giving such homilies on a frequent basis.’
    • ‘In her own lifetime Teresa had the good sense to ally herself with outstanding supporters such as the famous Dominican theologian.’
    • ‘They received permission to adopt the Dominican habit.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from medieval Latin Dominicanus, from Dominicus, the Latin name of Domingo de Guzmán (see Dominic, St).

Pronunciation

Dominican

/dəˈmɪnəkən//dəˈminəkən/

Main definitions of Dominican in US English:

: Dominican1Dominican2Dominican3

Dominican2

adjective

  • Relating to the Dominican Republic or its people.

    • ‘As a standard, the prevailing Spanish architectural style governed Dominican architecture for at least three centuries affecting building typologies across the board including the living quarters.’
    • ‘In 1838 a small group of Spanish-speaking Dominican intellectuals from Santo Domingo organized a secret society called La Trinitaria to overthrow the Haitian rule.’
    • ‘Most of the plane's 251 passengers were Dominican citizens or Dominican-Americans, many headed home for the start of the holiday season.’
    • ‘‘I was astounded,’ he said from his home in the Dominican capital of Santo Domingo.’
    • ‘He was born in New York City and went to high school in Miami, but he is of Dominican heritage, and the island claims him as one of its own.’
    • ‘After weeks of heavy rains, a downpour pounded the Dominican and Haitian island of Hispaniola.’
    • ‘The Victorian style dwelling is a symbol of Dominican sovereignty and it ironically was a descendant of the Indian bungalow - which for its own part has perennially been a symbol of Imperialism for the Indian people.’
    • ‘He came to his Dominican countryman's defense, saying the incident was being blown out of proportion by the media.’
    • ‘Winning in a Pan Am record time of 48.19 seconds, he sent the 18,000-seat Olympic Stadium crazy as he crossed the finish line, and took his lap of honour with the Dominican flag draped over his body.’
    • ‘We see events unfold through the eyes of Amabelle Désir, a young Haitian woman working as a servant to a young Dominican woman, Señora Valencia, whose husband is an officer in the Dominican military.’
    • ‘You can literally see the Dominican border when you fly into Haiti.’
    • ‘Remittances, monies sent back to family members still resident on the island, bring more foreign currency into the Dominican economy than any industry except tourism.’

noun

  • A native or inhabitant of the Dominican Republic.

    • ‘Now, my people are Dominicans - natives of the Dominican Republic - and are famous for the great quantities of plantain, another member of the banana family that we eat.’
    • ‘For example, the Tourism Secretariat in the Dominican Republic reported in 1985 that 20 percent of all visitors to the island from abroad were Dominicans who had previously emigrated.’
    • ‘Although 93 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, many Dominicans do not attend church regularly.’
    • ‘Authorities estimate 200,000 Dominicans live on the island of 4 million.’

Origin

From Spanish Dominicana, influenced by Santo Domingo.

Pronunciation

Dominican

/dəˈminəkən//dəˈmɪnəkən/

Main definitions of Dominican in US English:

: Dominican1Dominican2Dominican3

Dominican3

adjective

  • Relating to the island of Dominica or its people.

    • ‘The future of the Dominican state-run National Commercial Bank generated a rowdy debate in the island's Parliament on Tuesday.’

noun

  • A native or inhabitant of the island of Dominica.

    • ‘Though the island is often referred to as ‘sleepy’, Dominicans have shown themselves to be go-getting, converting three-quarters of their production to Fair Trade.’
    • ‘Native Dominicans are now being trained as clergy, but practitioners of the formal religions, particularly Catholic priests and nuns, have generally been foreigners.’

Pronunciation

Dominican

/ˌdäməˈnēk(ə)n//ˌdɑməˈnik(ə)n/