Definition of domiciliary in English:

domiciliary

adjective

  • Concerned with or occurring in someone's home.

    ‘a study compared domiciliary care with hospital care’
    • ‘Private domiciliary care has increased from 2 percent in 1992 to over 60 percent in 2002.’
    • ‘As one of only two consultants for the whole of west Cumbria, he travelled far and wide to outpatient clinics and did domiciliary visits all over the western Lake District.’
    • ‘For the past 20 years she has operated a domiciliary eye service in and around York, visiting patients at home or in care who cannot get out to visit their usual optometrist.’
    • ‘These covered domiciliary services and retirement living as well as residential aged care.’
    • ‘About 3 per million of the general population require domiciliary ventilator or oxygen therapy because of thoracic deformity.’
    • ‘The main difference between the two cases is that the expansion of the private residential and domiciliary intermediate care market will be funded mainly out of user charges, not social security.’
    • ‘She adds: ‘We have supported the shift to domiciliary care on the basis that this is what people want.’’
    • ‘In 1948, the National Health Service of England formalised the separation of domiciliary and institutional services.’
    • ‘‘Given that local councils are currently receiving substantial increases in funding for personal social services, it is important that they use this money to ensure the challenges faced by the domiciliary care sector are addressed’.’
    • ‘The Government agreed before Christmas to remove the unjust anomaly which excluded parents of severely disabled children, under the age of two years, from getting the domiciliary care allowance.’
    • ‘Yet she had nothing but praise for the care and attention which she received, from the maternity hospital, from the domiciliary midwife service and from her own medical general practice.’
    • ‘The domiciliary care allowance is designed to last from the moment of onset or diagnosis of a disability until the child involved reaches the age of 16 (at which point he or she becomes entitled to a disability allowance in their own right).’
    • ‘It's taking time to redistribute money from residential care to domiciliary care which is part of our policy of promoting independence and allowing people to live longer at home.’
    • ‘Security features include external cameras and an on-call emergency service and domiciliary nursing care.’
    • ‘In the same year there was also an important development in maternity services - to provide domiciliary midwifery care.’
    • ‘‘We have to keep the minor injuries unit, we have to keep X-ray facilities and we have to keep as many beds, not just for domiciliary purposes but for general purposes,’ he added.’
    • ‘Clinical and epidemiological data were collected from domiciliary cases and also from patients attending two medical camps that had been set up for the purpose.’
    • ‘He recounted a domiciliary visit when he sailed 20 miles to see a child on Arran.’
    • ‘Costs and data for medical services, drugs, inpatient admissions, metropolitan domiciliary services, and district nursing services were tracked.’
    • ‘Shorter stays in hospital for initial stabilisation followed by domiciliary care may, however, be equally effective.’
    family, home, private
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: from French domiciliaire, from medieval Latin domiciliarius, from Latin domicilium dwelling (see domicile).

Pronunciation:

domiciliary

/ˌdō-//ˌdäməˈsilēˌerē/