Definition of domicile in English:

domicile

Pronunciation /ˈdäməˌsīl//ˈdōməˌsīl//ˈdäməsəl/

noun

Law
formal
  • 1The country that a person treats as their permanent home, or lives in and has a substantial connection with.

    ‘his wife has a domicile of origin in Germany’
    • ‘So, you could have been born in France, but if your father was English, your domicile of origin is Britain.’
    • ‘It is accepted, accordingly, that mother has, by birth and through her father's then domicile, an English domicile of origin.’
    • ‘Normally a defendant must be sued in the courts of his domicile but Article 16 provides for exclusive jurisdiction in some cases, thus departing from that normal rule.’
    • ‘It appears that his domicile of origin was definitely in the United Kingdom.’
    • ‘When an individual acquires a domicile of choice, it is as if he is connected to his domicile of origin or dependency by a piece of elastic, known as the doctrine of continuance.’
    1. 1.1US A person's residence or home.
      ‘the builder I've hired to renovate my new domicile’
      • ‘The domicile and residence of the settlor and the beneficiaries is also relevant.’
      • ‘But even a die-hard horror movie fan wouldn't like his home to be the domicile of these eight-legged creatures.’
      • ‘And I would extensively be honored if you house me in your fine domicile for the weekend.’
      • ‘She was fascinated by the little domiciles, and inspected each one with grave fascination.’
      • ‘The initial domicile for these 45 clients consisted of 3/4 housing to provide them with structure and group living skills.’
      • ‘The best way I can think of to draw the kids back is to turn your domicile into a haunted house.’
      • ‘For the second start in a row, on Saturday night they made short work of the 39-year-old Yankee starter in their domicile, roughing him up for four runs and knocking him out after two innings.’
      • ‘Neighbourhood associations argued that non-owner-occupied domiciles, such as lodging houses, do not contribute to the community and degrade quality of life in their neighbourhoods.’
      • ‘In years past Mother never exhibited a scintilla of tolerance for insects, going to extreme and toxic measures to keep them from gaining entrance to her domicile.’
      • ‘A few months ago I wrote of a househunting trip, a visit to a domicile around the corner.’
      • ‘If I want to stay in my domicile, I should be allowed to stay?’
      • ‘Even as she gazed endlessly at her new domicile, Virginia did not feel at home, but rather as if she was being sent into a penitentiary.’
      • ‘Let's examine the domicile situation: apartment, loft, multi-bedroom home, abandoned storage unit.’
      • ‘In the Kalahari Desert, one of their domiciles, surface water is not to be found.’
      • ‘Days later, a black bear entered an Alaskan domicile and made itself, er, right at home.’
      • ‘However, her son and daughter-in-law also moved their domicile into the house without the elderly woman's permission.’
      • ‘Just marginally longer than his pickup, the little mobile domicile featured a closet sized bathroom to the immediate left of the one door, sofas that folded out to make beds, and a tiny galley kitchen.’
      • ‘They also draw new homes modeled on domiciles that sheltered the nation's first families.’
      • ‘Perhaps it's a standard for this type of domicile, a 1 1/2 story home built in 1943.’
      • ‘With housing loans, possessing a domicile of your dreams is no longer a mirage.’
      residence, home, house, address, residency, lodging, lodging place, accommodation, quarters, billet
      pad
      digs
      dwelling, dwelling place, abode, habitation
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 The place at which a company or other body is registered, especially for tax purposes.
      • ‘Wherever you're taxed, you'll need to know what your residency and your domicile are as they are not the same.’
      • ‘To enhance its generalizability, this study did not restrict its sample in terms of partner domiciles or host country locations.’
      • ‘There's a certain grim irony here from comments made at the 2001 shareholders meeting to consider the domicile shift.’
      • ‘To prepare for the listing, it was created as a holding company for the assets and its domicile moved to Britain.’
      • ‘Also required were a minimum stock market capitalization of $1 billion and, to avoid exchange-rate or foreign tax worries, a U.S. domicile.’
      • ‘This followed the news that the company was registering its tax domicile in Madeira.’
      • ‘I work for a British company and, for tax purposes, consider the UK to be my domicile.’
      • ‘The company is planning to move its domicile from Australia to London, broadening the potential investor base.’
      • ‘They have figured out how to rip off shareholder funds by moving to shifty offshore domiciles.’
      • ‘It collects flows and allocations data from both United States registered funds and funds registered in other leading domiciles such as Hong Kong, Luxembourg, Ireland, the UK, Caymans and Guernsey.’

verb

be domiciled
Law
formal
  • 1[with adverbial of place] Treat a specified country as a permanent home.

    ‘the tenant is domiciled in the US’
    • ‘Thus, most companies' security officers will be domiciled overseas.’
    • ‘The claimant is domiciled in the Republic of Ireland.’
    • ‘But where the defendant is domiciled within the jurisdiction such an order cannot be regarded as exorbitant or as going beyond what is internationally acceptable.’
    • ‘A person domiciled in a contracting state may also be sued.’
    • ‘It is not merely that a claimant is entitled to sue his defendant where he is domiciled; the defendant is entitled to be sued there.’
    1. 1.1US Reside; be based.
      ‘he was domiciled in a frame house on the outskirts of town’
      • ‘Down in Florida we have people domiciled in our headquarters facility.’
      • ‘The real plaintiff in the case, the New York Civil Liberties Union, charges that the police enforce quality-of-life rules only against homeless people, while ignoring the many domiciled offenders.’
      • ‘Since a great many of them live in the Caribbean or are domiciled in their Sun Belt mansions, many actually go north to spring camp.’
      • ‘Pops pauses, pondering my question, while my interrogating eyes lock onto a weary mole domiciled between his eyebrows.’
      • ‘They domicile me in a cat-free zone, but it's a problem.’
      settle, establish oneself, live, make one's home, set up home, set up house, take up residence, put down roots, have one's domicile
      go to live in, move to, emigrate to
      set up housekeeping
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin domicilium dwelling from domus home.

Pronunciation

domicile

/ˈdäməˌsīl//ˈdōməˌsīl//ˈdäməsəl/