Definition of dodge in English:



  • 1Avoid (someone or something) by a sudden quick movement.

    ‘we ducked inside our doorway to dodge shrapnel that was raining down’
    • ‘On this day it was a question of dodging the rain that at times hammered down, and then of course out came the Sun, and it was like playing in a sauna.’
    • ‘Vehicles merely gain speed near a zebra crossing for the fear of catching a signal and the pedestrians are left dodging speeding vehicles to get to the other end of the road.’
    • ‘He dodges her as she tries to hit him with the weapon.’
    • ‘We turned another corner, narrowly dodging another bullet, running down the alleyway.’
    • ‘My lips formed a silent O as we dodged what little traffic there was.’
    • ‘When the news was wafted to his father's factory, all his colleagues dodged him as if they were avoiding a deadly plague.’
    • ‘He attacked right then left, both parried and did a quick back roll to dodged a vertical attack.’
    • ‘She threw herself to the floor, just barely dodging a bullet that was aimed for her head.’
    • ‘He took a swing at him, but John nimbly dodged the blow.’
    • ‘How the trio dodge him, with timely help from the professor and the magical map of the prison castle is the rest of the story, which is filled with surprise twists and turns.’
    • ‘The children skillfully dodged him as they dashed out the door.’
    • ‘I stepped forward, trying to grab his shoulders, but he dodged me once again.’
    • ‘This time, he wasn't quick enough in dodging any attacks.’
    • ‘Mike nimbly dodged these attacks and delivered brutal counters that took out his enemies.’
    • ‘As he easily dodged the blow he brought himself behind Michael and grabbed his wrist with both hands.’
    • ‘I watched the fighter fend off or dodge the attack of every solo fighter.’
    • ‘If he made a sudden move, Ashley reckoned she might dodge him and escape.’
    • ‘I pushed myself up and dodged a sudden flurry to my right, just in time to avoid someone else's arms.’
    • ‘His hand stretched out to pet his cat but she dodged him and jumped over his stomach to purr against my legs.’
    • ‘Pensioners who have to dodge dual-carriage way traffic to catch a bus are dicing with death, a county councillor has claimed.’
    dart, bolt, duck, dive, swerve, body-swerve, sidestep, veer, lunge, jump, leap, spring
    elude, evade, avoid, stay away from, steer clear of, escape, run away from, break away from, lose, leave behind, shake, shake off, fend off, keep at arm's length, give someone a wide berth, keep one's distance from
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    1. 1.1[no object]Move quickly to one side or out of the way.
      ‘Adam dodged between the cars’
      • ‘The demons dodged from side to side spectacularly avoiding the bullets as Scarlett knew they would.’
      • ‘Jonathan easily dodged out of the way, and then rushed at the now defenseless student.’
      • ‘They went into the forest then, the horse dodged around the trees quickly and jumped over a dead log.’
      • ‘She pulled him up onto the seat behind her, swerving down over the main street to dodge through the rest of the traffic.’
      • ‘A face appeared in the doorway, but they quickly dodged away from the door.’
      • ‘She ignored him totally and quickly dodged through the mass swiftly, knowing he couldn't keep up.’
      • ‘Melanie quickly dodged out of the way moving next to Cameron.’
      • ‘I shook my head in dismay and dodged to one side as a BMW 3 series with loud rap music blasting out the open windows tried to turn me into a smear on the cobbled stone road.’
      • ‘He quickly dodged out of their way, but four turned and headed after him.’
      • ‘The people who heard him dodged to the side quickly.’
      • ‘Aaron jumped up and slashed down, forcing the terrorist to dodge to the left.’
      • ‘I grabbed my stomach and quickly dodged to my right, to avoid his fists yet again.’
      • ‘She quickly dodged to the right and stood to put her arm around my shoulder.’
      • ‘He dodged nimbly to the left and we fell on our faces in a puddle of mud.’
      • ‘Before she landed on me however I dodged to the side of the sofa, causing her to land flat on her face.’
      • ‘I swung at him but he dodged to one side, so I, without delay, moved behind him.’
      • ‘A silver flash flew at him, he dodged to the left just in time.’
      • ‘Tora quickly dodged out of the way as the creature sailed passed her.’
      • ‘With no warning at all, she charged forward, swiping her sword widely, but Davin quickly dodged to the side.’
      • ‘As he dodged to the side, he had to quickly move again as a tentacle came shooting towards him.’
    2. 1.2Avoid (something) in a cunning or dishonest way.
      ‘he went after people who had either dodged the war or invented a record in it’
      • ‘His failure to address that question leaves him open to the charge of dodging an important issue.’
      • ‘From what I understand there are a whole host of possibilities where they could be used to catch people who dodge their road tax or drop litter.’
      • ‘A compromise regarding participation in such a war is out of the question; this is why the Greens dodged the issue at their latest conference.’
      • ‘He remains in nimble form when it comes to dodging some questions, though.’
      • ‘Only if no attempt is made to collect my fare will I dodge payment.’
      • ‘Smith, who massaged facts and refused to face questions, dodged responsibility to the last.’
      • ‘He understands how to employ our military more effectively - despite dodging the draft during the Vietnam War.’
      • ‘Those are charges he says he has no intention of answering in the war crimes court, if he can dodge it.’
      • ‘People caught dodging the licence fee, which is £116 a year, can be fined up to £1, 000, plus court costs.’
      • ‘The subject has three choices: yes, no, or dodge the question.’
      • ‘No respite is given to the women constantly dodging detection and caught up at every turn by gender-specific restrictions.’
      • ‘The telecom company was asked to comment on the letter - and on the specific question of legal action - but decided instead to dodge the issue.’
      • ‘Are you dodging the social life question?’
      • ‘Everybody's got to be somewhere, and there I was in Vancouver at the age of five, dodging the draft into the War in Vietnam.’
      • ‘The same question recurs on every trip, and we never dodge it.’
      • ‘For a broader understanding of why his army lost the war he ought to poll the many who dodged the draft, not just the few who took the King's shilling.’
      • ‘Swindon Council has called in the bailiffs to sort out motorists dodging parking fines.’
      • ‘He dodges all sorts of critical questions that the reader wants answered: do extreme conditions really reveal nothing relevant about human motives and choices?’
      • ‘I do not think it is appropriate for a Minister to answer a question in the House in a way that attempts to dodge full responsibility for this appalling breach.’
      • ‘We have asked him direct questions and he never dodges them, although he may well give himself a moment of reflection before he replies.’
      avoid, evade, shun, get out of, slide out of, back out of, steer clear of, sidestep, circumvent, skirt round, bypass, give something a miss, find a way out of
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  • 2Photography
    Expose (one area of a print) less than the rest during processing or enlarging.

    • ‘This does take time, and if the end result wasn't quite what you wanted, then it was back to the enlarger to burn and dodge again.’
    • ‘So if you are using a fluorescent tube source, dodging and burning in the enlarged negative stage may be preferable.’
    • ‘This includes dodging and burning in selected areas within a photograph so long as it does not change the content of the image.’
    • ‘Similarly, a print area might require dodging during the initial exposure to keep it from reversing when solarized.’
    • ‘The sky was a dull gray color - vastly different than the solid black he created by dodging and burning the final print in the darkroom.’


  • 1A sudden quick movement to avoid someone or something.

    • ‘The boost in graphical detail has also improved their movements, making their dodges, grapples and infiltrations seem much more realistic.’
    • ‘He drew his knife and threw himself into a series of lightning-quick thrusts, parries, lunges, and dodges.’
    • ‘Swift dodges from all three prevented anything from happening, but it was close.’
    • ‘A guard shot at me but with a quick dodge from my new agility I managed to avoid at it.’
    • ‘Startled by his quick dodge, I lost my defensive edge.’
    • ‘The person swung around to avoid dodges and hits from Ewen and Tess.’
    • ‘As you enter the room, perform a rolling dodge to the left.’
    • ‘They paused for a moment and began to trade a flurry of blows, parries and dodges in a blur of movement.’
    • ‘It's frustrating, especially when your mad dodges and leaps bring you into the path of an enemy you couldn't see.’
    • ‘He had excellent ball control, beautiful dodges and his crosses were the most precise and measured.’
    • ‘After a series of dodges Hikaru started to lose his breath.’
    • ‘She rushed in, preparing to make a quick dodge into the kitchen to grab another drink and then get back out, but froze on the spot two steps into the house.’
    • ‘A quick dodge saved her head from an incoming fist.’
    • ‘The two swordsmen were behind him and they were starting to get the hang of his dodges.’
    dart, bolt, duck, dive, swerve, jump, leap, spring
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    1. 1.1A cunning trick or dishonest act, in particular one intended to avoid something unpleasant.
      ‘bartering can be seen as a tax dodge’
      • ‘Employers who attempt this dodge could be held liable for back payments of employment taxes, plus penalties and interest.’
      • ‘If this sounds like a dodge by those afraid of accountability, why the suspicion among successful districts?’
      • ‘I had just enrolled in graduate school, chiefly as a dodge.’
      • ‘The notion of diversity is simply an ideological dodge to conceal the fact that selection is being reintroduced to favour some at the expense of others.’
      • ‘What he's doing here is a bit of a dodge, and that's only encouraging the press to go after him again.’
      • ‘But such dodges can only hold the press at bay for so long.’
      • ‘The very first chief was initially derided as a fox guarding the henhouse, but he did a sterling job - precisely because he knew all the financial dodges.’
      • ‘Let's bring back ‘education and job training,’ those favored dodges from work responsibilities.’
      • ‘In theory, then, Mr. Secretary, can you address the corporate tax dodge?’
      • ‘The dining area is understated and tasteful, and thanks to a few interior dodges (fake windows and the odd mirror) it avoids inducing claustrophobia.’
      • ‘The effect has been to encourage the well-off to take out plans for children as a tax dodge.’
      • ‘Promoters who mass-market tax dodges now must disclose their deals and customers' names.’
      • ‘At the time, asbestos victims and unions warned it was a dodge to try and avoid escalating liabilities.’
      • ‘They present this response as a matter of conviction rather than an artful dodge.’
      • ‘I mean, that goes in the hall of fame of dodges and fishy explanations.’
      • ‘Citing such impersonal forces - such as poverty - is always a dodge for individual responsibility.’
      • ‘How dare this President collect taxes from ordinary Americans after touting a company that created 881 offshore dodges to avoid taxes.’
      • ‘The bill repeals restrictions on ‘top-heavy’ pension plans set up as tax dodges by employers.’
      • ‘Kelly, I suppose it's a bit of an artful dodge to say get rid of all 527s.’
      • ‘He thinks that being in college is a great dodge to avoid work, so he throws all the tests.’
      ruse, ploy, scheme, tactic, stratagem, subterfuge, trick, hoax, wile, cheat, deception, blind, pretext, manoeuvre, device, machination, contrivance, artifice, expedient
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Mid 16th century (in the senses dither and haggle): of unknown origin.