Main definitions of dock in English

: dock1dock2dock3dock4

dock1

noun

  • 1North American A structure extending alongshore or out from the shore into a body of water, to which boats may be moored.

    ‘the gangplank was lowered to the dock’
    • ‘They were given a heroes welcome when they rowed in to the boat park dock after their race.’
    • ‘A tiny, ancient dock bobs in the water, though there are no boats moored to it.’
    • ‘He built his own boat dock down in the lagoon for his 30-foot SeaRay powerboat.’
    • ‘Every year, several claims are filed for guests who couldn't even manage the short step between the dock and boat.’
    • ‘We have a ‘new to us’ boat at the dock and, being 10 years old, there's an extensive project list.’
    • ‘Our town is built near the water and my family and I even have our own dock and boat.’
    • ‘Evline said this as she watched the boat come into dock.’
    • ‘Sitting on a dock where his boat has been moored since Thursday night, he sided with the employees in the labour dispute.’
    • ‘I saw gas dripping out of the fill cap when the boat was at the dock.’
    • ‘She sat on the old boat dock soaking up the sunshine, after almost a week of rain she was ready for some sun.’
    • ‘It was tied to the really long, thin, dock trailing from the shore at the back of the Gambill residence.’
    • ‘It's a clear, freshwater lake and there is no shore power on the dock.’
    • ‘Commercial, pleasure and charter boats share the dock and Calhoun deserves a lot of credit for keeping everyone happy.’
    • ‘They lose more money if they decide to buy oil later as the price rises; otherwise they must let the boats sit at dock.’
    • ‘The question of whether boats damage a marina's docks during a storm or whether the docks destroy the boats when they fail is no academic exercise.’
    • ‘It's right on the shore, with a boat dock offering small boats for guests.’
    • ‘My lines of wooden docks housed small boats and jet-skis that bobbed in the water and tugged at the tethers.’
    • ‘This is an extremely important point and should be stressed to everyone who might be susceptible to motion sickness before the boat leaves the dock.’
    • ‘It looked like an old beach house with its own spooky run-down dock and boat house to boot.’
    • ‘There were a couple of boats tied to the dock, and just a little further was a boathouse.’
    1. 1.1 An enclosed area of water in a port for the loading, unloading, and repair of ships.
      • ‘India's export performance is under threat from workforce instability that has led to strikes by port and dock workers.’
      • ‘Union dock workers clashed with police at South Carolina port.’
      • ‘Boat owners can always call ahead to a marina and check on their latest price if they're cruising in an area with several fuel docks.’
      • ‘Once China lost control of its repair docks at Port Arthur, nothing could be done to put its damaged foreign-built ships back in service.’
      • ‘There were several ships in space dock, being repaired and refitted, but he was watching one in particular.’
      • ‘Since Julian was first to get to the ships' dock area, he had his choice of which one to take.’
      • ‘The two outer forks were retractable space docks for repairing larger ships.’
      • ‘Feeling a bit more relaxed, the two left the dock area and headed out the door.’
      • ‘There, slowly sailing towards them was a large ship coming from the docks of Port Refuge.’
      • ‘She sat on the wooden railing of the Port City docks, as sailors and merchants loaded and unloaded their ships full of goods.’
      • ‘I was working part-time at the docks, unloading the ship's cargo boxes and supplies.’
      • ‘Workmen at the docks were unloading the crates from the tugboats and cruises.’
      • ‘He made his way to the city and found his way to the dock area.’
      • ‘On the waterfront, it overlooked the ferry dock with the barrier reef and Tahiti visible on the horizon.’
      • ‘It was unaffected by the dock worker issue because its major port of entry for Japanese parts is in Mexico.’
      • ‘The plan included the deepening of the port of Walvis Bay, the construction of a container terminal and the dock at the Port of Luderitz.’
      • ‘With ships arriving faster than dock workers can handle them, the ports can't keep ahead of the rising tide of Pacific Rim cargo.’
      • ‘The dock workers could smuggle nationalist leaders into ships as stowaways.’
      • ‘The ageing loading and unloading facilities of the docks fail to satisfy the requirements of modern logistics.’
      • ‘Extensive reclamation of the land behind the existing Fisheries Complex in line with the port dock has already taken place.’
      harbour, marina, waterfront, port, anchorage
      wharf, quay, pier, jetty, landing stage
      dockyard, boatyard
      hithe
      moorage, harbourage
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2docks A group of enclosed areas of water along with the wharves and buildings near them.
      • ‘In Sete, the conflicts are apparent along the ancient docks.’
      • ‘Working at the docks on the river was the job selected to help me ‘get by’ during my first summer off from college.’
      • ‘The report recommends a maximum height of 12 storeys in underdeveloped areas such as around Heuston Station, Spencer Dock and the south docks.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, down at the docks, some sailors have finished drinking at the Blue Whale and are spilling out.’
      • ‘From the docks along the Eastern Seaway to the towering spires along the Western Peaks, the great city slowly rose from its slumber.’
      • ‘If the owner of the marina ever decides to provide electricity to the docks, you can get one of those lifts that bring the whole boat out of the water.’
      • ‘The docks were the main target, but many of the bombs fell on surrounding residential areas.’
      • ‘He's in a shack on the eastern docks in Newport City.’
      • ‘At one point 16,000 dockers organised mobile pickets and closed the docks along the Thames.’
      • ‘The investment firm has recently been linked to a bid for Associated British Ports - owner of docks in Swansea, Plymouth and Hull.’
      • ‘The Ramirez Penthouse was located down by the docks.’
      • ‘At about 2.30 am, his body was pulled from the water by the lifeboat crew down by the docks, near the jetty.’
      • ‘The docks were of great social as well as economic significance to Belfast.’
      • ‘Blaise walked along the docks, holding his breath as the unfamiliar scent of fish reached his nose, making him gag.’
      • ‘He walked along the docks, and up ahead of him there was a man hidden in the shadows.’
      • ‘Charles also ordered that navy rations stored in the docks in the East End should be given to those who had fled the city.’
      • ‘During the 1926 General Strike I remember standing in Commercial Street as troops went by in armoured cars to go to the docks.’
      • ‘There has been high interest in the site but its future remains shrouded in controversy as numerous competing plans exist for the last site along the old docks.’
      • ‘At the centre of the docks is Ivory House, a converted warehouse that was transformed 23 years ago into 37 flats.’
    3. 1.3
      short for dry dock
      • ‘We drive through the long tunnel until we reach the dry docks.’
    4. 1.4 A platform for loading or unloading trucks or freight trains.
      • ‘At two of its other distribution centers, dual-sorting systems - two parallel conveyor belts from the floor to the loading dock - pack trucks twice as fast as single conveyors can.’
      • ‘It was the square building with the concrete loading dock, sitting all alone in the parking lot.’
      • ‘Three separate tractor-trailer loading docks on two different levels can accommodate 36 trailers simultaneously.’
      • ‘The numerous loading docks, which run along the entire perimeter of the building, allow the transfer of materials to the various stores within.’
      • ‘They already had been supporting other unions by refusing to back their trucks up to supermarket loading docks.’
      • ‘Each window is dimensionally similar to a loading dock.’
      • ‘The small man in the ill-fitting suit suddenly grows large and becomes some no-neck union rep on a loading dock exhorting the working stiffs to the cause.’
      • ‘After that first year of college I was humping freight on loading docks for a summer job, and on breaks us kids would shoot the bull with the truck drivers.’
      • ‘In 1916 the steel and concrete ore dock was erected.’
      • ‘We're sitting on a little loading dock at the edge of train tracks.’
      • ‘If it gets dropped, or left on a loading dock, it will suffer.’
      • ‘The concrete was 6 inches thick in the parking terrace and 8 inches to 10 inches thick in the loading docks to accommodate the heavy trucks.’
      • ‘As the convoy arrived at the dock, the lorry doors opened and the exhausted, terrified lambs poured out, trying desperately to stay upright and avoid trampling each other.’
      • ‘‘We were already delivering products to the loading dock,’ he says.’
      • ‘They forget there's an entire warehouse back there with 20 employees and loading docks.’
      • ‘All through the plant, everything moves towards that shipping dock.’
      • ‘We've been skating those metal loading docks lately.’
      • ‘There wasn't really anything to look at but the loading dock to the train station.’
      • ‘Not surprisingly, procedures and security systems for loading docks, mail rooms and alternative entrance ways into high-rise buildings have become a major focus.’
      • ‘Garages and loading docks in buildings are a major source of carbon monoxide.’
  • 2A device in which a laptop computer, smartphone, or other mobile device may be placed for charging, providing access to a power supply and to peripheral devices or auxiliary features; a docking station.

    • ‘As I set that up for her, I noticed that the rear of the dock had both a VGA connector and a DVI-D connector.’
    • ‘The dock is like a tilted U, and the keyboard slides into its curve.’
    • ‘There are two USB sockets for charging, which will come in handy if you're using a phone that won't fit on the dock.’
    • ‘The 15Gb model doesn't come with a remote or dock, while the 40Gb will be over-expensive (and expansive) for most people.’
    • ‘I have a dock next to my bed where my phone gets plugged - I also have another one at my computer desk.’
    • ‘The M7100 ships with a docking cradle that doubles as both an in-unit battery charger and a data-transfer dock.’
    • ‘The Athens PC contains a dock for a tablet PC or a notebook to synchronize with the host PC.’
    • ‘You put four AA batteries in it and then plug the H320 into its dock and the AAs recharge the H320's battery.’
    • ‘A button marked SHARE lets you flag photos for specific actions when you connect it to a computer or to a printer dock.’
    • ‘The 40GB version also includes a dock.’
    • ‘The dock requires the laptop to be closed in order to insert it.’
    • ‘inside the house, the phone stays on the dock.’
    • ‘People were playing music through their iPads or on phones through an iPod dock.’
    • ‘The benefit here is that the dock charges the phone at the same time.’
    • ‘The camera comes without too many extras, though a rechargeable battery and charging dock were welcome additions to the package.’
    • ‘This year, Apple has chosen to begin accessorising its iPhones once again, offering new docks and cases for the new phones.’
    • ‘Sometimes you gotta give your phone a rest, and that's where phone docks come in.’
    • ‘Have an iPod dock and just recently purchased a new Android phone?’
    • ‘I often have to put my phone on the dock 3-4 times before it'll go into dock mode.’
    • ‘The tablet and phone connect easily and quickly - the tablet fires up as soon as you connect them - and the phone sits safely inside the dock without any fear of falling out.’
    • ‘Other people pop their phone onto a dock as soon as they return home.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 (of a ship) tie up at a dock, especially in order to load or unload passengers or cargo.

    ‘the ship docked at San Francisco’
    • ‘There are too many rocks to allow boats to dock safely, he says.’
    • ‘Each of the three quarry companies owned frontage on the river where ships docked to load brownstone.’
    • ‘Cale's voice breaks over the com ‘Cargo ship, docking now’.’
    • ‘Once they had safely docked, John began making arrangements to restock the Marianne.’
    • ‘No one really wanted to remain on-board ship when they had finally docked after spending months at sea.’
    • ‘The ferry finally docked on the shore, and we disembarked.’
    • ‘US ports now demanded 96 hours notice before any ship docks and a full list of crew in advance.’
    • ‘A cargo ship docked and discharged heavy trucks of the kind used to carry tanks or other heavy armour.’
    • ‘New on the scene to help house Mississippi's homeless, a 490,000 passenger cruise ship docking next door in Mobile, Alabama.’
    • ‘I hadn't been on a ship since then and now seeing a ship about to dock made me sick.’
    • ‘Some sailors saw the pirates dock illegally at our harbor and sent out a warning they were in the area.’
    • ‘The ferry docked at Portsmouth on Monday evening at around 9pm.’
    • ‘You begin the campaign on a ship docked at Pearl Harbor.’
    • ‘When the boat docked at the pier in South Pattaya near sunset, there was no ceremony to greet them.’
    • ‘She'd once heard, the cargo and mail ship docked every two weeks at Majdi.’
    • ‘Adjacent to the town was the main port where the bulk of the fishing and cargo ships docked.’
    • ‘Aircraft carriers docked at the naval pier and marines regularly practised amphibious assaults on the north shore of the bay.’
    • ‘Ships, of course, need a place to dock, and passengers need to be processed.’
    • ‘That has pretty much been the case since the first slave ship docked in the country back in 1619.’
    • ‘When we arrive there, we will dock, unload our cargo, and change ships.’
    moor, berth, land, beach, anchor, drop anchor, put in, tie up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object] Bring (a ship or boat) into a dock.
      ‘the riverbank where the fur traders docked their boats’
      • ‘On deck, Freyen was looking at the manoeuvres to dock the vessel with a serious look on his face.’
      • ‘They will have to pay almost half a million pounds a year in harbour charges for docking their ferries at the new terminal at Hatston.’
      • ‘We drove out to where he docks his boat, in a little harbor northeast of St. John's.’
      • ‘Luxury yachts are docked in the harbour, and giant cruise ships are anchored swimming distance from the beach.’
      • ‘This is especially true if you dock your boat in a marina.’
      • ‘A large yacht is docked by the mansion, moving up and down with the breeze.’
      • ‘After a few minutes of rowing she docked the boat at a small wharf.’
      • ‘After docking the boat and then checking in with the boat master, Rys and her crew headed into town.’
      • ‘The abandoned ships were docked, forgotten in the fascination that was brewing around them.’
      • ‘Over 15,500 boats were docked at these marinas.’
      • ‘They learn how to fish, including how to bait the hook, tie knots and rig tackle, even back up a trailer and dock a boat.’
      • ‘He reached his destination, the southern most port city in Camaeron and docked his boat.’
      • ‘The Quays welcomed two Galway Hooker sailing boats and a flotilla of sailing vessels were docked at Albert Basin.’
      • ‘He docked his boat at a sub-divisional town at dawn.’
      • ‘In the game, you're the captain of one of the cruise ships, and you have to try and dock your massive vessel in various ports.’
      • ‘He is exhausted and as he docks the boat, he falls over and lies with the mast on him.’
      • ‘Be sure to row to the tiny island in the middle of the lake, dock your boat and go inside the island's church to ring the bells.’
      • ‘They quickly ran down and into the beach area, where a boat was docked.’
      • ‘After ten days or so, the land had all but ceased to exist - I didn't care if we ever docked the boat.’
      • ‘One half of it is where the town is located, where all the people are situated and where the fishermen dock their boats.’
    2. 1.2 (of a spacecraft) join with a space station or another spacecraft in space.
      • ‘After that both radar systems broke down which meant that we knew for certain the commander would have to dock with the Space Station manually.’
      • ‘From there you've got to learn to handle your ship and get to grips with the most difficult part - docking with the space station.’
      • ‘She will dock with the International Space Station, bringing vital spare parts and supplies to the current residents.’
      • ‘The space shuttle will dock at the International Space Station.’
      • ‘The first shuttle to dock with the space station in more than two years is leaving it a cleaner place as the two crafts prepare to disengage.’
      • ‘As the NASA shuttle orbiting the Earth docked with the Mir space station, the hacker disrupted the computer systems monitoring the medical conditions of the crew.’
      • ‘While the Marines had been preparing to leave, a Russian space shuttle had docked at the space station.’
      • ‘This shuttle would not even be docking with the International Space Station.’
      • ‘The unmanned cargo ship Progress docked with the International Space Station today.’
      • ‘Around 2.5 tonnes of supplies were due to dock with the space station last night.’
      • ‘At times you really believe you are piloting your ship and are about to dock with a space station.’
      • ‘The two ships would dock in orbit, and propellants would transfer into the lunar craft.’
      • ‘Two days later, the craft will match the orbit of the international space station, enabling it to dock safely.’
      • ‘If for any reason an emergency arises, the crew members have a Russian-made Soyuz vehicle docked to the space station to bring them back to Earth.’
      • ‘A cargo ship successfully docked with the international space station yesterday, delivering supplies and equipment for its US and Russian crew.’
      • ‘He was Commander of Atlantis as it docked with the Russian space station Mir.’
      • ‘In the meantime, the shuttle has docked with the International Space Station.’
      • ‘The Atlantis successfully docked with the space station on Wednesday and Sellers and the crew joined those aboard the orbiting outpost for dinner to mark the occasion.’
      • ‘They are scheduled to return to earth in October aboard a Russian Soyuz capsule now docked with the space station.’
      • ‘American space shuttles docked with the Mir space station nine times.’
    3. 1.3 Attach (a piece of equipment) to another.
      ‘the user wants to dock a portable into a desktop computer’
      • ‘Light-emitting diodes indicate that the system has been docked successfully.’
      • ‘They lowered the module back into place and successfully docked it onto the Raptors hull.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German docke, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

dock

/däk/

Main definitions of dock in English

: dock1dock2dock3dock4

dock2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually be docked
  • 1 Deduct (something, especially an amount of money)

    ‘their wages are docked for public displays of affection’
    [with two objects] ‘he will be docked an hour's pay’
    • ‘They had lost their first match by a point and then they were docked two points and so they were going into our game at minus two after one round.’
    • ‘After that event at school, his parents had grounded him for a month, and docked his allowance until Christmas.’
    • ‘If they are a minute late, they are docked an hour's pay.’
    • ‘In the interim they were drinking all the time, running up a tab that would be docked from their wages.’
    • ‘The union has already raised concerns that some workers have had the costs of their safety equipment docked from wages.’
    • ‘The scheme is operated by the employer, who docks the money each week and passes it to the charities.’
    • ‘They have to wait until the end of the day or their pay is docked.’
    • ‘Two points are deducted if pupils are persistently disruptive and three points are docked for the most serious offences, including bullying, truancy or swearing at staff.’
    • ‘Previously, they had docked their wages by 50 per cent.’
    • ‘Buddhism receives donations for its temples which are automatically docked from the wages of civil servants.’
    • ‘Working-class people sometimes face the choice between standing in line to vote and being docked an hour's pay.’
    • ‘Clubs in England's Nationwide League who take that action are now docked points.’
    • ‘At the start of the third game the referee informed her that she had been docked another point for dissent and bad language.’
    • ‘Money docked for work-to-rule days was later refunded.’
    • ‘Although angry that the Government will dock the wages of those who take part, teaching unions have committed to keeping schools open.’
    • ‘If staff forget their swipe card they are sent home to retrieve it - and the pay is docked for the amount of time they spend going home to get it.’
    • ‘If they won't do their Constitutional duty, shouldn't we dock their pay?’
    • ‘I used to work in a restaurant as a teenager and I would have been docked a week's wages had I tried to use that many prawns on a starter.’
    • ‘The inspector ended up making her visit extremely short, and we were hardly docked any points.’
    • ‘His sporting empire collapsed and Chesterfield were docked nine league points for financial irregularities.’
    reduce, cut, cut back, decrease, lessen, diminish
    deduct, subtract, remove, debit, discount, take off, take away
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Cut short (an animal's tail)
      ‘fifteen of the dogs had had their tails docked’
      • ‘The docking of working animals' tails will only be allowed where there is a risk of tail injury.’
      • ‘Aside from the schipperke's thick ruff, the most striking feature of the breed is its tail - or lack thereof, since the tail is typically docked.’
      • ‘If the tail must be docked, the breed standard dictates that no more than one third of the tail may be removed.’
      • ‘Such dogs were exempt from taxes, and their owners docked the dogs' tails to document their occupation.’
      • ‘Breeders of dogs whose tails are docked for cosmetic purposes say a ban would detract from the visual attraction of certain types.’
      • ‘Unfortunately his tail has had to be docked to prevent further damage but he is still a very attractive and adorable boy.’
      • ‘The law would also ban tail docking except where an owner can prove that a working animals' tail needs to be docked in order to minimize the risk of injury to the animal.’
      • ‘I would not have bought either had their tails been docked, and I consider the procedure totally unwarranted except in the odd occasion.’
      • ‘The move follows pressure from animal rights groups and many vets who claim it is barbaric to dock tails for cosmetic reasons.’
      • ‘I don't think dogs' tails (or farm animals' tails, for that matter) should be docked and I'm comfortable with a bill that makes this law.’
      • ‘Here I might be in trouble with the law again, for my dear little Jack Russell terrier Polly has had her tail docked.’
      • ‘Hopefully it'll clear up and he'll get full use of his tail back, but there is a possibility that he may have to have his tail docked at the point where it is injured.’
      • ‘If the longhair's tail is docked at all, only a vertebrae or two are removed.’
      • ‘The court heard how he then went on to illegally dock these puppies tails by tying a rag round their tails to stop the blood supply.’
      • ‘The Society launched a campaign in support of the Bill, which would ban the docking of dogs' tails unless the tail is damaged or diseased.’
      • ‘The Princess Royal shocked delegates at the British Veterinary Association's annual conference in Harrogate in 1992 by defending docking the tails of working dogs.’
      • ‘He also claimed he did not know that docking the puppies' tails was illegal, said Mr Orsborn.’
      • ‘So small-minded is this government that it is unable even to organise the bill to restrict docking of dogs' tails.’
      • ‘It's something that's been done for hundreds of years and in some cases no one can actually remember why certain breeds of dogs have their tails docked.’
      • ‘Fighting dogs' tails were docked to give their opponents one less body part to grab.’
      cut off, cut short, shorten, crop, lop, prune, truncate
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1The solid bony or fleshy part of an animal's tail, excluding the hair.

    • ‘Jason grabbed the towels and spread them at the dog's tail and dock.’
    1. 1.1 The stump left after a tail has been docked.

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps related to Frisian dok bunch, ball (of string, etc.) and German Docke doll The original noun sense was the solid part of an animal's tail whence the verb sense cut short (an animal's tail) later generalized to reduce, deduct.

Pronunciation:

dock

/däk/

Main definitions of dock in English

: dock1dock2dock3dock4

dock3

noun

usually the dock
  • The enclosure in a criminal court where a defendant is placed.

    ‘the nine others in the dock face a combination of charges’
    • ‘There was increased security in court following an incident yesterday in which a prisoner jumped from the dock at the court and tried to attack the judge.’
    • ‘In the dock, the two accused sat perfectly still.’
    • ‘Since they were too small to see over the dock of the court, a special platform had to built.’
    • ‘Reporters hung about the docks, waiting for released convicts to land.’
    • ‘The pair were led up into the glass-panelled dock of a packed Court 4 flanked by three uniformed security guards.’
    • ‘A man vaulted a court dock and fled into a town centre after hearing he would be spending Christmas behind bars.’
    • ‘A teenage burglar who leapt from the dock at York Magistrates Court has been locked up for three-and-a-half years.’
    • ‘A thief had to empty his pockets out in the court dock to prove he was skint.’
    • ‘She hobbled into the dock at Manchester Crown Court and admitted being overpaid nearly £28,000 in benefits.’
    • ‘Addressing the court from the dock, he said: ‘I am truly sorry for the pain I have caused.’’
    • ‘The new initiative comes just months after a defendant leapt over the dock at Southend court and made a dash for freedom.’
    • ‘A man who attacked a prison officer while in a court dock has been jailed for three months.’
    • ‘Allies of convenience that are well known to be guilty of egregious acts are now hauled into the dock as war criminals as soon as we have the chance.’
    • ‘The first time he gave an indication of his relief was to smile at the police officer who was standing beside the dock as she was to allow him to move free from the court.’
    • ‘His mother was allowed to sit by his side in a dock at Manchester Crown Court where he denies attempted murder.’
    • ‘Another image on her studio workbench was of a very young man with his eyes downcast, sitting in a dock next to a court officer.’
    • ‘In June, a 10-inch kitchen knife was found taped under the dock of court 17, which handles cases involving serious crime.’
    • ‘The 10-inch-long knife was found taped to the dock in number 17 court, which is used for remand prisoners brought up from cells in the basement.’
    • ‘He was flanked by two police officers and a court security officer as he stood in the glass-enclosed dock at Harrogate Magistrates Court.’
    • ‘At 10.24 am he was brought without handcuffs into court and through the prisoners' docks.’

Origin

Late 16th century: probably originally slang and related to Flemish dok chicken coop, rabbit hutch of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

dock

/däk/

Main definitions of dock in English

: dock1dock2dock3dock4

dock4

noun

  • A coarse weed of temperate regions, with inconspicuous greenish or reddish flowers. The leaves are popularly used to relieve nettle stings.

    • ‘In the allotments, paths overgrown with nettles and docks are littered with squashed cans and chocolate wrappers between walls of rusting corrugated iron topped with barbed wire.’
    • ‘Pesticides, similarly, were unknown: docks, nettles and thistles were scythed away by hand just as they came into seed.’
    • ‘I was out with this dangerous looking implement this afternoon, cutting down nettles, rosebay and docks nearly as tall as I am.’
    • ‘This is rarer and is usually caused by weeds such as nettles and docks, late flowering plants and fungal spores.’
    • ‘Vegetables were not cultivated, but came in the form of wild carrots, turnip and garlic, along with salad leaves such as sorrel, nettle and dock.’

Origin

Old English docce, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dialect dokke.

Pronunciation:

dock

/däk/