Definition of do-over in English:

do-over

noun

informal
  • An opportunity to try or perform something a second time.

    ‘if Smokey sings off key, he gets a do-over’
    • ‘With concern about voters in both states being disenfranchised, there is a growing talk of a do-over.’
    • ‘At issue there, fraud allegations that could, if seen as credible, lead to a do-over.’
    • ‘In a do-over, he'd have everyone get comfortable using the slide show.’
    • ‘Part of what's in your way now - besides just plain wanting him back - is also wanting a do-over.’
    • ‘His presentation on this new track is slightly smoother (one of the advantages of a do-over, I guess).’
    • ‘Also, Michigan Democrats hope for a possible primary do-over.’
    • ‘The Clinton campaign sounded unhappy with the decision not to hold a do-over.’
    • ‘More money will now be required for a do-over, the first anyone can remember in this city.’
    • ‘Do you want B back, or do you just want a do-over?’
    • ‘Regardless, I urge them to return to Vancouver for a do-over.’
    • ‘And "restating" is just the boardroom equivalent of asking for a do-over on the playground.’
    • ‘"There's no such thing as a do-over when you have an abuse of fundamental rights."’
    • ‘What are the odds the Eagles wish they had a do-over on the suspension thing?’
    • ‘And a few days after that, Artest's agent asked for a do-over with the Pacers.’
    • ‘Well, it's a big do-over for "American Idol" tonight, as the "Idol" vote turns into an "Idol" embarrassment.’
    • ‘Now, here's the beauty: We get a do-over.’

Pronunciation:

do-over

/ˈdo͞oˌōvər/