Definition of diverge in English:

diverge

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1(of a road, route, or line) separate from another route, especially a main one, and go in a different direction.

    • ‘Solzhenitsyn talks about ‘the great fork of camp life’ where two roads diverge.’
    • ‘But the fact that she could not overlook was that their paths had diverged.’
    • ‘For beginners to this study, it sometimes gets confusing with all the lines converging and diverging to and from each other.’
    • ‘In that case, the shape of the universe is analogous to the shape of a saddle, in which initially parallel lines diverge.’
    • ‘He thought that many small changes could cause two lines of life to diverge.’
    • ‘The road will diverge into three paths soon and it is then that we part.’
    • ‘The airport is west of the city beyond the junction where the Glasgow and Fife lines diverge.’
    • ‘Could two roads have diverged as far apart as these two and still be on their way to meeting?’
    • ‘Rapidly the distance between the two vehicles increased as their courses diverged.’
    • ‘The curious thing about religion in this country is that it is beginning to diverge along two quite separate pathways.’
    • ‘Three hollow rays diverge at angles of 120 degrees from the central part.’
    • ‘The Loop Variant involves trolley tracks that diverge at the switch and then join together again in a loop.’
    • ‘They don't fight, but O'Neal and Bryant remain two roads diverged.’
    • ‘Starting six or seven years ago, these two lines diverged dramatically: The volume of imports soared, while export growth leveled off.’
    • ‘About halfway between the temple and the main road, a path diverged to the left.’
    • ‘Two roads diverged in a wood, and I - I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all of the difference.’
    • ‘The trail diverges further as we track back past Old English and Classical Latin.’
    • ‘Narrative lines may diverge sharply on the third or fourth page, or in the second paragraph.’
    • ‘‘We stand now where two roads diverge,’ Carson wrote in the final chapter of Silent Spring.’
    • ‘Just south of here is where the New Haven diverges off the Harlem Line, just beyond the Woodlawn Metro North station.’
    separate, part, disunite, fork, branch off, divide, subdivide, split, go in different directions, go separate ways
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    1. 1.1 (of an opinion, theory, approach, etc.) differ markedly.
      ‘the coverage by the columnists diverged from that in the main news stories’
      ‘studies from different viewpoints yield diverging conclusions’
      • ‘Thenceforward these two approaches tend to diverge.’
      • ‘As the season begins, however, our two concepts diverge significantly.’
      • ‘The essay by Craig Dworkin's diverges wildly from this approach.’
      • ‘Today's offering suggests two issues where our opinions diverge.’
      • ‘Let's talk about the wildly diverging opinions.’
      • ‘But this common concept once shared by the East and West has diverged.’
      • ‘Some of the most interesting speakers in the Commons debates were those who diverged slightly from party lines.’
      • ‘Thus, our opinions diverge on the question of how consistent the book is in its overall treatment of its subjects.’
      • ‘I addressed only the final point you made because it was there that our opinions diverged.’
      • ‘Where we diverge most sharply with Mr. Dean is on his emerging world view.’
      • ‘There are other ways too in which these supernatural encounters diverge from the medieval norm.’
      • ‘Once a condition progresses, however, approaches to treatment diverge among cultures.’
      • ‘But while both performances include period instruments, their approaches to the music diverge in revealing ways.’
      • ‘Such a convergence was not a given - the two approaches sometimes diverge.’
      • ‘Already, we can see why they may diverge in their approach, and hence their conclusion, to a case.’
      • ‘They argued that correlations could increase while observed and simulated global means diverge.’
      • ‘On one key subject in particular, European and American attitudes diverge and are moving further apart by the day.’
      • ‘Although not thoroughly tested in the courts at the time of writing, legal opinion diverges widely on these questions.’
      • ‘On some issues, the views of faculty diverged significantly from public opinion.’
      • ‘Our experiences and opinions diverge in areas and on issues I consider most important to the larger ‘body politic.’’
      differ, be different, be unlike, be dissimilar
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    2. 1.2 Deviate from a set course or standard.
      ‘suddenly he diverged from his text’
      • ‘The hard part is predicting where the the course of the future will diverge from the past.’
      • ‘However, of late, some State forces have diverged from the national plan.’
      • ‘Of course, one must know the direct trajectory to diverge from it, and one must know where the orbit is to be able to go off it.’
      • ‘I diverged from the newspaper standard of never changing a quote.’
      • ‘But towards the end of the speech, Bacon diverges sharply from this text.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, slang items often diverge from standard usage in predictable ways, especially by generalization and melioration.’
      • ‘Our path seems destined to continue diverging from that of the Europeans.’
      • ‘The article he wrote diverged from the official line; it was never printed.’
      deviate, digress, depart, veer, swerve, turn away, turn aside, branch off, drift, stray
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    3. 1.3 Develop in a different direction.
      ‘howler and spider monkeys diverged from a common ancestor’
      • ‘Living chimps have diverged genetically from that common ancestor about as far as people have, the researchers add.’
      • ‘Recently diverged species will not demonstrate reciprocal monophyly for some time after they have stopped exchanging genes.’
      • ‘Assume that chimpanzees and humans diverged from a common ancestor about five million years ago.’
      • ‘Although the Alligator sequence was considerably diverged from the avian sequences, a reasonable alignment could be achieved.’
      • ‘As in the case of Hsp 70 genes, these two groups of genes diverged long before the separation of animals and fungi.’
      • ‘However, different parts of the genome may diverge at different rates.’
      • ‘After bony fishes and mammals diverged about 400 MYA, class II genes increased enormously in the mammalian lineage.’
      • ‘A recent further analysis reveals that the diverging development between these two groups is, in fact, even more explicit later on.’
      • ‘From pollen data, these are estimated to have diverged 6 MYA.’
      • ‘Hence the authors concluded that gene expression had diverged most rapidly in the human brain.’
      • ‘Arrangements in the upper line represent periods in which duplicated genes diverged.’
      • ‘The hybridization occurred shortly after the two lineages diverged (old hybridization).’
      • ‘The element encodes a Gag protein, and retroelement Gag protein sequences diverge more rapidly than the Pol sequences.’
      • ‘So depending on how it gets handled, the stable/developer strands could diverge immediately.’
      • ‘Daughter corallites generally diverge at various angles, and subsequently turn vertically and grow subparallel.’
      • ‘But local infection rates and trends quickly diverged.’
      • ‘In the six million years since the human and ape lines first diverged, the behaviour and lifestyles of apes have hardly changed.’
      • ‘It is only after about the sixth week that male - female developments diverge.’
      • ‘As the tangents diverge, a sample of found sound enters the piece, with crowd murmur and the whine of vehicle brakes.’
      • ‘In this study, we assumed that humans and mice diverged 100 MYA.’
  • 2Mathematics
    (of a series) increase indefinitely as more of its terms are added.

    • ‘There we have an intuitive reason for believing that the harmonic series diverges.’
    • ‘He gave an example of a trigonometric series which diverged at every point, yet its coefficients tended to zero.’
    • ‘However, the harmonic series actually diverges - the sum increases without bound.’
    • ‘For this series, it also gives a sum if t = 1, but as soon as t>1, the series diverges.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from medieval Latin divergere, from Latin dis- ‘in two ways’ + vergere ‘to turn or incline’.

Pronunciation