Definition of ditty in US English:

ditty

noun

  • A short, simple song.

    ‘a lovely little music-hall ditty’
    • ‘A remake of the lilting Irving Berlin ditty Blue Skies began playing as the lights came up.’
    • ‘Despite these efforts to rely on wall-to-wall ditties, psalmodic chant still figures prominently in the Weekday liturgy.’
    • ‘In her spare time, the lawyer likes to do nothing better than knock out a few ditties from the Great American Songbook on her baby grand piano.’
    • ‘The audience were all ears when the teams crooned ditties from the golden 80s.’
    • ‘Ballads have been penned, poems have been composed and ditties have been compiled.’
    • ‘The red legions sang the old ditty about Paul Scholes scoring goals, which is true again at long last.’
    • ‘Indeed, I muttered tuneless, dire ditties that I myself had composed.’
    • ‘After a couple of songs the members sang ditties from the latest movies.’
    • ‘As though he has just come back from India and the great Maharishi, Brother JT songs resemble campfire ditties, with an odd tinge.’
    • ‘Not a word did he speak to the little girl, but began singing a little ditty, an old tune full of light and the sun's laughter.’
    • ‘Blink 182 play very fast punk-metal ditties that might be anthemic were they not furiously out of time.’
    • ‘Alternatively, enjoy the day by composing a ditty about tonight's guest of honor at the Washington Hilton.’
    • ‘My nearly 2-year-old granddaughter Tiana can almost sing all the ditties and do her dances to the tunes.’
    • ‘The repertoire includes military marches, old Japanese ditties, songs from kabuki theaters or yose variety theaters, and sometimes jazz.’
    • ‘And for younger fans the ‘Great Harwood Blue’ uses a modern rap song for his ditty.’
    • ‘A great political balladeer, he is at his superb best when singing melancholy personal ditties, with that soulful voice and tuneful guitar.’
    • ‘While Robespierre ranted, he directed the band of the Garde Nationale and served up Jacobin ditties.’
    • ‘They sing the famous ditty, ‘Tom, Tom the piper's son, stole a pig and away he run.’’
    • ‘Coates wry, muttered lyrics lend his ditties a mischievous if subdued charm.’
    • ‘If you know only Kander's pop ditties (and, to my regret, I do), these three will surprise you.’
    poem, piece of poetry, lyric, sonnet, ode, limerick, rhyme, composition, metrical composition, piece of doggerel
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French dite ‘composition’, from Latin dictatum (neuter) ‘something dictated’, from dictare ‘to dictate’.

Pronunciation

ditty

/ˈdɪdi//ˈdidē/