Definition of dissent in English:

dissent

noun

  • 1The expression or holding of opinions at variance with those previously, commonly, or officially held.

    ‘there was no dissent from this view’
    • ‘The policy has apparently generated little dissent from within the Scouts.’
    • ‘These words provoked no murmurs of dissent from this largely Republican crowd.’
    • ‘When a state's appropriation imparts too generous a benefit to religion alone, the establishment clause should provide a pathway to dissent.’
    • ‘Brown wrote the Committee for the Nation expressing his dissent from the President's gold purchasing program in late 1933.’
    • ‘I have continually argued for France's right to express its dissent from the opinion of the international community.’
    • ‘There have been some signs of dissent from Barnaby Joyce and Queensland Liberal Senator David Johnston about the states' rights implications of the plans.’
    • ‘There is some dissent from this among the comments - particularly Carrie.’
    • ‘He pointed out that it was easy to exaggerate the importance of Australian expressions of dissent from Allied plans, and Curtin's messages.’
    • ‘Fair enough, but why did we hear so little dissent from within the movement?’
    • ‘To march is a symbolic act not only of dissent from the government's position but to remind everyone that a people is not - and can never be - the same as a regime.’
    • ‘Yet the organisation, with no dissent from the Executive or the Crown Office, continues to stand by its discredited experts.’
    • ‘Protest, chant, yell, shout your dissent from the rooftops.’
    • ‘But this is exactly the model that China has chosen to take - with little in the way of dissent from the ‘international community’.’
    • ‘The move caused widespread discontent in the Conservative Party and open dissent from leading modernisers.’
    • ‘It is at delicate moments in world affairs, such as this, that expressions of widespread dissent from opinion-formers can become a real political force.’
    • ‘An ‘anti-national’ Press is not alone in its dissent from the orchestrated spectacle.’
    • ‘He has just about put the lid on dissent from within the Cabinet.’
    • ‘This is the first sign of an Opposition shaping up to reflect current dissent from so many of current government policies.’
    • ‘One is composed of intellectuals, people who preach dissent from the values of the ‘core culture.’’
    • ‘But in a move seen as an attempt to quell this dissent from the back benches, Mr Cullen announced the abolition of plans for the direct election of mayors.’
    disagreement, lack of agreement, difference of opinion, argument, dispute, demur
    disapproval, objection, protest, opposition, defiance, insubordination
    conflict, friction, strife
    arguing, quarrelling, wrangling, bickering
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Refusal to accept the doctrines of an established or orthodox church; Nonconformity.
      • ‘A state religious court evaluating nonconformity or dissent deserves whatever answers it receives.’
      • ‘The Inquisition's actions would be excessive today because we have the leisure to tolerate dissent with no threat to our survival - not as yet, at any rate.’
      • ‘One perspective reflected a background of English / Welsh dissent and the other a Scots / Irish covenanter tradition.’
      • ‘It called for a new crackdown on doctrinal dissent, and recommended a papal investigation of American seminaries, the subtext of which was to blame gays.’
      • ‘Church, democracy and dissent: Paul Rule reviews two books by Paul Collins.’
      • ‘No thesis of theology escapes criticism, and no edict is exempt from conscientious dissent.’
      • ‘It seems to me that this approach to dissent has the potential to be pastorally disastrous.’
      • ‘A theology of dissent has become the new establishment.’
      • ‘Historians sometimes make the mistake of thinking that early modern religious dissent argues secularization.’
      • ‘I maintained that my dissent was not from core tenets of Catholic faith, but from noninfallible church teachings.’
      • ‘Are you getting at the fact that perhaps what we see in religious practice is not so much dissent, active opposition, but a kind of muddling through?’
      • ‘Or in the face of dissent when his party had lost their way and run short of food the avid Bible student resorted to his Scriptures.’
      • ‘That kind of perspective teaches me the need to respect dissent, nonconformity, and liberty of conscience as priority Baptist values.’
      • ‘Their readings have roots in and derive their stimulus from historical and political schema of dissent outlined in the biblical narratives.’
      • ‘They issue Tracts carrying forward a debate about Anglican identity: the Church of England would be Catholic but it would stand against Popery on the one hand and dissent on the other.’
      • ‘For all liberals, the stumbling block in Newman's work is his consistently held conviction that the act of faith allows no room at all for dissent or doubt.’
      • ‘Any dissent or questioning of the group's teachings is discouraged.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Hold or express opinions that are at variance with those previously, commonly, or officially expressed.

    ‘two members dissented from the majority’
    ‘there were only a couple of dissenting voices’
    • ‘What's the difference between dissenting by deciding and taking the law into your own hands?’
    • ‘Not one Supreme Court justice dissented from the Moyer opinion, which was drafted by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.’
    • ‘But a significant minority in the Conservative Party dissented from this view.’
    • ‘On every matter on which he could have dissented from the Government in its formation, he has gone with the Government.’
    • ‘No respondent dissented from the vocational view, but teachers rarely voiced it.’
    • ‘When I dissented from the liberal line on race, the Texas papers depicted me as a racist.’
    • ‘They don't extend to justices who have dissented from the principle.’
    • ‘Alito, on the Circuit Court had dissented from the majority and said that Congress had the right to so act.’
    • ‘Most participants dissented from time to time and said they did not want to go on, but the researcher would prod them to continue.’
    • ‘Seven judges expressed a separate opinion, while two dissented from the majority.’
    • ‘People can disagree, differ and dissent, even within the ruling party, without this negatively affecting the stability of our country and the peace that we continue to enjoy.’
    • ‘The third judge, Lord Justice Neuberger, dissented from this, stating that he did not consider it conducive to a fair trial.’
    • ‘Only a fool likes to hear the sound of his own voice. We welcome dissenting opinions.’
    • ‘Some of them were actually aggressive, convinced that anyone who dissented from the view that their child was a genius must be motivated by malice.’
    • ‘He can be unpredictable and even manage to dissent from established opinion, if only on the margin.’
    • ‘Only one Senator out of the hundred dissented from the passage of the Patriot Act, which is providing unprecedented powers for law enforcement bodies.’
    • ‘For the right it is an article of faith that scientists are dogmatic atheists with the will and the power to crush anyone who dissents from orthodoxy.’
    • ‘He tangled with other cardinals and disciplined church officials who dissented from official church policy.’
    • ‘However, some Democrats dissented from that conclusion.’
    • ‘Even before the dramatic escalation of hostilities yesterday, two Labor MPs publicly dissented from Labor's position.’
    1. 1.1 Separate from an established or orthodox church because of doctrinal disagreement.
      • ‘That is, we dissented from somebody else's religion, and we paid the price for it.’
      • ‘Baptists dissented from a state religion that claimed the right to determine what should be believed and how belief should be practiced.’
      • ‘Along the way, Fraser reminds us, various sects dissented and established parochial schools.’
      • ‘There developed in Qumran a Jewish sect that dissented from Sadduceanism and was hostile to the Pharisians.’
      • ‘Iranian historians were biased towards groups that dissented from mainstream Islam and rebelled against the Islamic caliphate.’
      differ, demur, diverge
      disagree with, fail to agree with, express disagreement with, be at odds with, be at variance with, argue with, take issue with
      decline to support, refuse to support, not ratify, protest against, object to, dispute, challenge, quibble over
      reject, repudiate, renounce, abjure
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin dissentire differ in sentiment.

Pronunciation

dissent

/dəˈsent/