Definition of disquiet in English:

disquiet

noun

  • A feeling of anxiety or worry.

    ‘public disquiet about animal testing’
    • ‘The scale of public disquiet is such that the government has intimated that the redeployment has a limit of 30 days.’
    • ‘Over in the UK where plans are well underway to do just this, there's a growing groundswell of public disquiet.’
    • ‘In fact there was not; but public disquiet was understandable.’
    • ‘The official end of hostilities has not ended public disquiet.’
    • ‘More and more governments are having to step in and override these magistrates who arrogantly refuse to take note of public disquiet.’
    • ‘They talk tough while their actions add to the numbers and so also to public disquiet about the scale of immigration.’
    • ‘We also suggest that some elements of the policy process around the single market contributed to the subsequent public disquiet about European integration.’
    • ‘These cases were extremely influential in the campaigns for abolition, and understandably so: there was too much public disquiet about them.’
    • ‘Murphy acknowledged that he was aware of public disquiet over the matter and that his office was inundated with calls asking for the matter to be finalised.’
    • ‘There was public disquiet about the private finance decision but Mackie says improving the educational experience is at the heart of all his proposals.’
    • ‘There has been considerable disquiet and unease since the news broke in September that the Patrician Brothers were closing the school.’
    • ‘The Government has also yielded to public disquiet over the inability to deliberately spoil votes.’
    • ‘Despite considerable public disquiet, the post-Maastricht period saw substantial policy development.’
    • ‘The recommendation was made because past cases had caused public disquiet.’
    • ‘Moreover these are signs of a wider public disquiet over the US actions.’
    • ‘The euthanasia programme was discontinued on Hitler's order in August 1941 because it was causing public disquiet.’
    • ‘But, if so, what according to him is the true significance of the kind of unease or disquiet to which he refers?’
    • ‘The last thing any hospital needs during a period of public disquiet is another type of scare to increase anxiety.’
    • ‘And this is only a pale reflection of the extent of public disquiet and the belief that the prime minister was lying.’
    • ‘In other situations the publication of suspicions may unreasonably give rise to public disquiet and speculation.’
    unease, uneasiness, worry, anxiety, anxiousness, distress, concern
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as adjective disquieted
  • Make (someone) worried or anxious.

    ‘she felt disquieted at the lack of interest the girl had shown’
    • ‘Given that, are you in any way disquieted by your certainty that we should withdraw?’
    • ‘Many people were disquieted about the macho posturing about the fire-fighters.’
    • ‘The Patent Office's adventurousness gratified biotechnologists, but it also disquieted many clerics.’
    • ‘It's summer break and Pete is disquieted by the fact that he won't make it into Heaven.’
    • ‘Mostly, though, his opponents were disquieted by his notion that the world might be older than the biblical chronology would indicate.’
    • ‘Their findings disquieted the Dundee support.’
    • ‘Admittedly I was quite disquieted by the thought of songs lasting longer than 15 minutes, but I should not have worried.’
    • ‘The idea that this state might not be the only possible one partly disquieted him and partly bored him.’
    • ‘I stole the signatures from stories that disquieted me.’
    • ‘Perhaps you, too, were upset or disquieted by those photos of women holding hands with women, men flashing their matching wedding rings.’
    • ‘‘The report disquieted a lot of people at the BBC,’ he says.’
    • ‘I was instantly disquieted and remembered my neglect with regret.’
    • ‘But when he reached gallantly to kiss my hand and I first looked into the eyes of General Eduard Rinaldi I was disquieted.’
    • ‘While some people were comfortable with it, many more were disquieted, even deeply offended.’
    • ‘Obviously he felt disquieted by the procedure and felt that it would have been possible for him to have protected the complainants adequately had the normal process of cross-examination proceeded.’
    • ‘But when a new student, Francis arrives at the school, Olivier is obviously disquieted.’
    • ‘And despite dire warnings of certain columnists alluded to above, Americans by and large do not seem overly disquieted by contemporary French trends.’
    • ‘I watched some of the hundred greatest kids' TV programmes ever in the world programme on Monday, and the outcome disquieted me.’
    • ‘In truth, his encounter with Toby Addington had disquieted him.’
    • ‘I am a little disquieted by the fact that, in the case of the Army at least, the aid is disbursed through the military command structure.’
    perturb, agitate, upset, disturb, unnerve, unsettle, discompose, disconcert, ruffle, startle
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Pronunciation

disquiet

/dɪsˈkwaɪət//disˈkwīət/