Definition of disk in English:

disk

(also disc)

noun

  • 1A flat, thin, round object.

    ‘heavy metal disks the size of hockey pucks’
    ‘onion soup ladled over a disk of cheese’
    • ‘A flat, thin disk was in the middle of the bracelet and on one side had only one word.’
    • ‘The biggest advantage of dynamic disks is the ability to manage disks and volumes without rebooting the operating system.’
    • ‘Web pages can also be saved to disk from Netscape or the Windows version of Internet Explorer.’
    • ‘As you can see, with disks, sequential access is much faster than random access.’
    • ‘In other words, the data remains on disk until a system administrator can remove it.’
    • ‘Because scans are stored to either a floppy disk or Zip disk, no computer hook-up is needed.’
    • ‘Pulling a moment, he finally extracted a pair of flat metallic disks on a thin chain.’
    • ‘The operating system and disk subsystems will not be optimized for file serving.’
    • ‘Rotating a round disk of laser material provides a simple way to implement the technique.’
    • ‘A backup set can consist of parts of a single disk or multiple hard disks as required.’
    • ‘The data representing the effective image size on the disk are rewritten in response to an entered alteration command.’
    • ‘It can encrypt data being sent between systems and then archive encrypted data on disk or tape.’
    • ‘The hard disk data, however, is accessed on a tiny spinning disk inside the thin card.’
    • ‘In addition, traditional databases are built to store data on disk.’
    • ‘Thus it would take about 20 years to transmit all the data on those disks over U.S. Internet backbones.’
    • ‘The metals are melted and combined to form a flat, round disk.’
    • ‘Scan the disk with anti-virus software before you use it.’
    • ‘Because of this, companies have not been able to optimize their use of disk for data protection.’
    • ‘In all practical disks, a thin insulating layer is formed between the recording layer and the quenching layer.’
    • ‘DVD disks are coded with the regions in which they are allowed to play.’
    1. 1.1 An information storage device for a computer in the shape of a round flat plate that can be rotated to give access to all parts of the surface. The data may be stored either magnetically (in a magnetic disk) or optically (in an optical disk such as a CD-ROM)
      • ‘Inodes are data structures, but they are usually stored on a disk and read into memory for reference and modification.’
      • ‘Much like a cache, the buffer is a data area between the requests being sent to the hard disk, and the data stored on the disk itself.’
      • ‘They were then told that they could create their own three-dimensional sculptures or structures using our store of computer disks and CD-ROMs.’
      • ‘Contractors should back up their computer data weekly; any backup disks should be stored off-site in a secure location.’
      • ‘As long as the virus is active on the computer, it can copy itself to other files or disks that are accessed.’
      • ‘These paradigms combine the data longevity of tape with the fast, random access of disks.’
      • ‘Secondly, there is less data to travel through disks into computer memory and then to tape devices.’
      • ‘With redundant data stored across multiple disks built into every pack, even if one disk is damaged beyond repair, the entire data set can still be rebuilt.’
      • ‘Investigators seized computers and disks from his home, which he shares with his parents.’
      • ‘Lower priority data is stored deeper and deeper on the disk where data access rates are slower.’
      • ‘It is now understood that over 1000 documents were taken during the raids, that also included computer disks and other stored digital data.’
      • ‘If you decide to use floppy disks, which is the cheapest but most haphazard method of backing up information, rotate the disks on a regular basis.’
      • ‘The future for the mobile device market is likely to require small diameter disks storing much information.’
      • ‘Additionally, the original CD-ROM disks can be stored away where they won't get lost.’
      • ‘The data-replication option enables data stored on the local disks of one system to be mirrored to another system.’
      • ‘Once inside the warmth of her apartment, she stored the disks in her computer nook, locked the door and hung up her coat before checking her messages.’
      • ‘Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised’
      • ‘An exact image of your server disks stored on a remote network or a removable drive will provide you with the fastest bare-metal restore possible.’
      • ‘While computer hard and floppy drives and the disks they store data on are based on the physics of magnetism, optical drives and their discs are based on the physics of light, or optics.’
      • ‘When I tried it in several different computers, the disk was not even recognized by the different CD-ROM drives.’
    2. 1.2 A CD or phonograph record.
      • ‘These three songs appeared on the bonus disc that was added to the boxed set.’
      • ‘Great care has been taken with both discs in the order of appearance, track by track, as each experiment seems to fade nicely into the other.’
      • ‘Placido Domingo has released more than 100 recital discs, crossover albums and complete operas over his five-decade career.’
      • ‘The six discs are packed into three slip cases that all fit nicely into the cardboard box.’
      • ‘Where the first disc paints a picture of a band at the top of their game, the second disc depicts a band trying to justify its continued existence.’
      • ‘The disc has a much more edgy, electronic sound that doesn't go over-the-top, but it does mix in elements that haven't existed on any of the band's previous discs.’
      • ‘The songs of peace on these two discs are packed with some of the top artists that Canada and Britain have to offer.’
      • ‘The 24 episodes from the program's sixth season appear on five discs.’
      • ‘Both discs are packed to the rafters with music and as such deserve nothing less than a wholehearted recommendation.’
      • ‘Too bad the bands on the disc couldn't have been as creative with their music as with the CD.’
      • ‘This disc marks the first appearance of material written under the wing of the record company.’
      • ‘Moving on to the discs, it appears that this third season is the third release with a significant problem.’
      • ‘The Munich-based label has made a name for itself with its discs of live recordings, mostly operatic, taken from more than half a century of Salzburg festivals.’
      • ‘Most self-titled discs come when a band first appears on the music scene, kind of like a blank slate for the band to build a name on.’
      • ‘Their Mendelssohn discs also include a recording of the Octet.’
      • ‘He has recorded two discs of Schubert's piano music and the Charlton recital is given in preparation of a third.’
      • ‘And that is what makes the appearance of the new Stones discs so important.’
      • ‘Tribute discs appear at various stages in a performing artist's career.’
      • ‘That said, these discs are packed with great songs.’
      • ‘Don't get me wrong, there are excellent discs packed with time capsules and great music.’
    3. 1.3discs One of the suits in some tarot packs, corresponding to coins in others.
      • ‘Discs (or Pentacles) are the pragmatic suit. Sometimes people see them as plodding and a bit slow, but this is unjust.’
      • ‘The man represented by the Prince of Disks is a quiet and meditative man, who works with unfailing determination towards the goals he sets himself.’
      • ‘The name of each suit is printed at the bottom of pips and court cards (Queen of Discs, Four of Staves).’
      • ‘The Suit of "Pentacles" is also known by other names, such as "Coins", "Discs" or "Disks".’
      • ‘Take the 3 of Disks as a largely positive card, which shows that hard work and concentration can eventually gain you your highest objectives.’
  • 2A shape or surface that is round and flat in appearance.

    ‘the smudged yellow disk of the moon’
    • ‘The Irish milliner, celebrated for his daring designs, has produced a seat large enough for two people in the shape of a large disc with an indentation.’
    • ‘Then at the far end of the rings a glowing disc appeared in the first one.’
    • ‘As he stared at the bright, off-white disk, though, he was distracted by some small flashes of light, which started appearing just below the disk of the moon.’
    • ‘A huge disc appeared to be rising from the south over the Mediterranean.’
    • ‘At dawn, the moon will be as far away from the sun as its orbit will carry it and as a result will appear out to the North Sea as a dark disc surrounded by a vibrant ring of fire.’
    • ‘The sun was only six degrees high in the south and was shining on the unusually short contrail giving the appearance of a shiny disc.’
    • ‘A graphic appeared on the screen next to the newswoman that was shaped like a flying disc.’
    • ‘As the lunar disk cleared the horizon, it appeared that a chunk had been taken out of its bottom.’
    • ‘There was no contrail and the disc appeared to be at an altitude of 20 to 25 thousand feet.’
    • ‘Appearing as a black disc 30 times smaller than the sun's diameter, it will slowly move from left to right over the course of six hours.’
    • ‘Venus will appear as a small disc moving across the sun between 10.45 a.m. and 4.51 p.m.’
    • ‘The Sun is many times larger than the Earth, but distance makes it appear like a small disc.’
    • ‘But the outer boundaries of the disks orbiting the younger stars I mentioned are as much as twenty times farther away from their central stars.’
    • ‘What strikes the human eye is the uniquely singular soaring roof, shaped like a slanted disc, which also appears to be in the form of the rising sun.’
    • ‘On the left, the mouth of a megaphonelike shape contains concentric blue lines punctuated by small yellow disks.’
    • ‘The once-in-a-lifetime event takes place when Venus passes through the disc of Sun and appears like a small spot moving slowly across the Sun when viewed from the Earth.’
    • ‘Great Horned Owls are large, powerful owls with prominent ear-tufts, prominent facial disks, and bold yellow eyes.’
    • ‘The sword was spinning so fast that you could only see a green disc shape.’
    • ‘The disc glowed yellow and filled the room with plentiful light.’
    • ‘Since the cloud was rotating, its spherical shape flattened into a disc.’
    1. 2.1 A layer of cartilage separating adjacent vertebrae in the spine.
      ‘he suffered a prolapsed disc’
      • ‘Even when you're just standing, the vertical alignment of your spinal column causes compressive forces on the rubbery disks that separate your vertebrae.’
      • ‘Alternatively the ligaments may become loose, so that the disc of cartilage no longer stays between the jaw bone and the skull when the joint is moved.’
      • ‘Vertebral discs cushion the spine, like spongy coasters between each vertebra that protect bones from banging against each other while one is running or jumping.’
      • ‘This structure of vertebrae and discs is supported along its length by muscles and ligaments.’
      • ‘Towards the ends of the long bones there are specialized discs of cartilage (epiphyseal plates) stretching across the entire bone.’
    2. 2.2Botany (in a composite flower head of the daisy family) a close-packed cluster of disk florets in the center, forming the yellow part of the flower head.
      • ‘Root and green leaf discs were arranged centrally on the agar plate.’
      • ‘In this study a new experimental technique was used that allowed the measurement of cuticular transpiration of isolated plant cuticles and leaf discs.’
      • ‘Leaf discs from plants expressing aequorin were excised and incubated in thiols as described above.’
      • ‘This assumption is supported by studies in which cysteine was supplied to leaf discs of poplar plants.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, many conclusions about growth and respiration are based on measurements of single leaves, leaf disks or mature plant parts.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cultivate (a field) with a disk harrow.

    • ‘Fertilizing, stalk chopping, disking, field cultivating and planting are all occurring now.’
    • ‘Plowing, disking, or chiseling fields soon after wheat harvest incorporates the residue into the soil.’
    • ‘We are currently chisel plowing, disking, and field cultivating.’
    • ‘When machine seeding, plant in a shallow furrow or spread seeds out and disk them into the soil.’
    • ‘To prepare the land, Lou mows down the scrub weed trees and remnant sugar cane where they plan to plant and then a neighboring farmer is hired to disk the ground.’

Usage

Generally speaking, the US spelling is disk and the British spelling is disc, although there is much overlap and variation between the two. In particular, the spelling for senses relating to computers is nearly always disk, as in floppy disk, disk drive, etc., but disc is the norm for compact disc, disc brakes, and disc camera

Origin

Mid 17th century (originally referring to the seemingly flat round form of the sun or moon): from French disque or Latin discus (see discus).

Pronunciation

disk

/dɪsk//disk/