Definition of disinterest in English:

disinterest

noun

  • 1The state of not being influenced by personal involvement in something; impartiality.

    ‘I do not claim any scholarly disinterest with this book’
    • ‘It's much more difficult to manage absolutely truthful disinterest.’
    • ‘I watched with detached disinterest as Sean and Amber presented themselves to the audience and received their medallions from the organizers.’
    • ‘Let's bring back some healthy disinterest into governing.’
    • ‘Americans can participate in this process - though it has been a long time now, we have acted with disinterest and imagination before.’
    • ‘Boyle is not arguing in bad faith; he believes passionately in the concepts of scientific disinterest and utilitarian progress that his works promote.’
    • ‘The company went so far as to publish its own statement of disinterest in the global credential.’
    • ‘Does the discovery and presentation of the truth require disengaged disinterest?’
    • ‘In fact, I think the word I'm looking for is disinterest, in the sense of impartiality.’
    • ‘Read the article with scientific disinterest, then reply.’
    • ‘As Brynor neared, he glanced at each of us in turn with the casual, detached disinterest of a scientist examining a particularly repulsive insect.’
    impartiality, neutrality, objectivity, detachment, disinterestedness, lack of bias, lack of prejudice
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  • 2Lack of interest in something.

    ‘he chided Dennis for his disinterest in anything that is not his own idea’
    • ‘Some people exude outright disinterest and apathy towards their country's films.’
    • ‘Students gave many reasons for their disinterest.’
    • ‘I laughed rather loudly, much to her disinterest.’
    • ‘A new generation is growing up with no memory of military rule, but it is too early to say for sure whether that will translate to anything more than disinterest.’
    • ‘It is unacceptable to treat Tasmania with such apparent disinterest.’
    • ‘As a result of this cycle of mutual disinterest, young people tend to have a weaker party identification than their elders do.’
    • ‘Even his own Swedish media show similar disinterest.’
    • ‘This combination of disinterest and absolute power slowly cripples the actual goal of having an easily accessible and open network available.’
    • ‘With my female friends, as soon as the topic shifts towards politics or current affairs, there is an obvious display of disinterest.’
    • ‘A few brave and honest voices across the political spectrum spoke up, struggling to be heard through a fog of disinterest.’
    • ‘In part it is governed by familiarity breeding disinterest, if not contempt.’
    • ‘A hand propping up his head shows his disinterest in the conversation.’
    • ‘I'm used to people looking at me in loathing or disinterest.’
    • ‘Another aspect of the issue was the disinterest of people in Australia in the observations of those who had had extensive recent experience of Thailand and its neighbours.’
    • ‘That's because the fault lies with the education system and so one will have to look deep down and find out what's causing this disinterest and hatred towards academics.’
    • ‘The poll reveals a notable level of disinterest among respondents for politics as usual.’
    • ‘Given the buzz surrounding his latest effort, his disinterest is somewhat surprising.’
    • ‘The Ministry of Health showed massive disinterest.’
    • ‘Despite asking for the manager and reiterating my claim to them I was met with utter disinterest.’
    • ‘Perhaps it's his obvious disinterest towards talking about himself, which permeates our interview, that is the most telling.’
    indifference, lack of interest, lack of curiosity, lack of concern, lack of care, lack of enthusiasm, dispassionateness, dispassion, impassivity
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Pronunciation

disinterest

/dɪsˈɪnt(ə)rəst//disˈint(ə)rəst/