Definition of discommode in English:

discommode

verb

[WITH OBJECT]formal
  • Cause (someone) trouble or inconvenience.

    ‘I am sorry to have discommoded you’
    • ‘We don't want, in any way, to discommode people.’
    • ‘He said that while he was extremely relieved that no device was found, it was appalling that patients were discommoded and upset in this way.’
    • ‘Some may feel discommoded by the new arrangements.’
    • ‘We want also to express our concern and sympathy to any person in the community who was discommoded by students' activities during Rag Week.’
    • ‘My family has already been discommoded by my career.’
    • ‘And in all of that time I can honestly say that I have never noted any of them being seriously discommoded by the demands of parenthood.’
    • ‘Do we believe he would really be that discommoded to find himself in such splendid company?’
    • ‘Obviously if you are espousing change, it's going to discommode and upset certain people.’
    • ‘He might similarly be discommoded by firefish, I continued, which are easier to spot but no less hurtful.’
    • ‘The standard of diversion signs, etc were not up to standard and the Council have apologised to the people discommoded.’
    • ‘We obviously do not want to discommode people, and I understand their reaction to a degree, but the other gates of the park are open.’
    • ‘I suspect there's no law against it, but considering the obvious discommoding this causes for residents in the area, it is a practice I would certainly frown on.’
    • ‘‘It is incumbent upon him to better communicate with those who are discommoded by this incident,’ he added.’
    • ‘Others are discommoded because a constituency colleague has won preferment.’
    • ‘There are people living close to the terminal who will be seriously discommoded by the project and there are some who genuinely have fears for their health if the terminal project goes ahead.’
    • ‘Players and travelling fans are being discommoded in great numbers to satisfy those who stay at home.’
    • ‘It is a reasonable assumption to conclude that the latter have decided to wreck the agreement and the British will not discommode them.’
    • ‘People who are genuinely discommoded should be compensated in order to facilitate the provision of infrastructure which will benefit the entire community.’
    • ‘There will be people who are so discommoded that compensation will not make them happy but, for most, compensation will prove a soothing balm.’
    • ‘His colleague is similarly discommoded by the party's incoherent response to recent events.’
    disturb, trouble, worry, inconvenience, put out, impose on, pester, badger, harass, molest, plague, beset, torment, nag, hound, dog, chivvy, harry, annoy, upset, irritate, vex, provoke, nettle, try someone's patience, make one's hackles rise
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century: from obsolete French discommoder, variant of incommoder (see incommode).

Pronunciation

discommode

/ˌdiskəˈmōd//ˌdɪskəˈmoʊd/