Definition of discomfit in English:

discomfit

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make (someone) feel uneasy or embarrassed.

    ‘he was not noticeably discomfited by her tone’
    • ‘She succeeded in discomfiting him even further.’
    • ‘Scenes will discomfit you, partly because the dialogue is not quite up to the mark in his quest for black humour.’
    • ‘Recently, I've found myself more than a little discomfited by examples of intolerance that seem to be cropping up around me.’
    • ‘Well, he's just made it clear that you've succeeded in discomfiting him and his crew.’
    • ‘My students were not at all puzzled by this, although they were discomfited that their parents were paying six figures for such an education.’
    • ‘Tight-lipped, he appeared discomfited by the questions thrown at him, and relied on streams of impenetrable government-speak for his responses.’
    • ‘Beatrice's apology was more gracious, and she was visibly discomfited by her father's manner.’
    • ‘For his part, he was coolness and dignity personified and rejected the chance to discomfit his opponent still further by insulting him.’
    • ‘If a politician cannot speak discomfiting truths without being thrown out of office, then we can expect to have more politicians who will tell us comforting lies.’
    • ‘Her gaze was suddenly penetrating, and it almost discomfited him.’
    • ‘It has proven itself right time after time. It has discomfited its critics and it has repeatedly astonished even its pessimistically inclined well-wishers, such as myself.’
    • ‘Her green eyes danced with laughter as she discomfited her brother.’
    • ‘His odd, slightly discomfiting palette-a range of hues informed by but not faithful to the colors of the natural world-contributes to a sense of disequilibrium.’
    • ‘But they are discomfited by the normalcy of it all.’
    • ‘The overused phrase ‘politically correct’ is usually code for something newish that discomfits the writer.’
    • ‘It was like a whole different world here; I was suddenly discomfited by my family's humble home.’
    • ‘More often, he uses his talents to discomfit people who deserve it, deflating the pretentious and humbling the arrogant.’
    • ‘Actions like these would threaten businesses and discomfit drivers.’
    • ‘The poor boy was clearly discomfited, but we can never resist a mystery, so he gulped out an answer.’
    • ‘It's a nifty device too, because it reminds you of the show's discomfiting ambiguity.’
    embarrass, make uncomfortable, make uneasy, abash, disconcert, nonplus, discompose, discomfort, take aback, unsettle, unnerve, put someone off their stroke, ruffle, confuse, fluster, agitate, disorientate, upset, disturb, perturb, distress
    chagrin, mortify
    faze, rattle, discombobulate, set someone back on their heels, make someone laugh on the other side of their face
    make someone laugh out of the other side of their mouth
    View synonyms

Usage

The words discomfit and discomfort are etymologically unrelated. Further, discomfit is a verb and discomfort is primarily a noun. But in modern use, their principal meanings as a verb have collapsed into one: ‘make (someone) feel uneasy.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense defeat in battle): from Old French desconfit, past participle of desconfire, based on Latin dis- (expressing reversal) + conficere put together (see confection).

Pronunciation:

discomfit

/disˈkəmfət/