Definition of disciplinary in English:

disciplinary

adjective

  • Concerning or enforcing discipline.

    ‘a soldier will face disciplinary action after going absent without leave’
    • ‘The work of the disciplinary and performance committees is explored in some detail below.’
    • ‘The appropriate course for me to take is to remit the matter to the disciplinary committee.’
    • ‘As far as I can see the Football Association has no option but to revise its disciplinary procedures.’
    • ‘Under the policy those who regularly take sick leave without good reason face disciplinary action.’
    • ‘I wonder if you can help us out with a spot of translation in a final disciplinary hearing involving a French girl?’
    • ‘If found guilty, the two officers could face serious disciplinary sanctions.’
    • ‘Now the two men have also been cleared at a council disciplinary hearing.’
    • ‘If there is such overwhelming evidence of fraud, then follow your disciplinary procedures.’
    • ‘Why put this to the disciplinary committee is the question asked among club circles?’
    • ‘Now he is in charge of a department which includes people who sat on the disciplinary panel which led to him being fired.’
    • ‘Yet even the latter pair have been among those with disciplinary problems.’
    • ‘He announced that the three men would face a special disciplinary committee.’
    • ‘The matter will be dealt with at the next meeting of the disciplinary committee on a date yet to be set.’
    • ‘Such advice might concern the best use of a disciplinary policy or where to get help for some particular problem.’
    • ‘They will be holding seminars dealing with disciplinary and grievance procedures.’
    • ‘Police admit this was an error and disciplinary proceedings against the operator could follow.’
    • ‘He said he not been informed that his appearance before council officials was a disciplinary hearing.’
    • ‘Following investigations, he was suspended and a disciplinary case began.’
    • ‘It said it was head office policy and anyone refusing to comply could be issued with disciplinary warnings.’
    • ‘He said that all disciplinary action had been followed in line with a procedure agreed with unions.’

Origin

Late 15th century (originally with reference to ecclesiastical order): from medieval Latin disciplinarius, from Latin disciplina, from discipulus learner (see disciple).

Pronunciation:

disciplinary

/ˈdisəpləˌnerē/