Main definitions of dinky in US English:

: dinky1dinky2

dinky1

adjective

North American
informal
  • Small; insignificant.

    ‘I can't believe the dinky salaries they pay here’
    • ‘This one's kinda dinky, but I'm not getting as much time to write as I'd thought.’
    • ‘With so many speaker systems to choose from, there's little need to listen to a movie through the dinky hookup in your television.’
    • ‘Finally, about half an hour later, Lauryn was dressed, fed, and in the dinky vehicle she liked to call a car, on her way to Chris's house.’
    • ‘It is fair to say the only Porsche I could have afforded would have been a dinky toy.’
    • ‘The dark was broken only by a few dinky lampposts here and there along the stretch of bumpy road.’
    • ‘I don't want dinky little reviews that tell me nothing.’
    • ‘I'd probably be stuck in Flordia, going to work every single day, and getting married at a dorky, dinky wedding down there.’
    • ‘At best, the application could be called dinky; the interface is horrendous, and there is no user manual, or anything to really indicate what is going on.’
    • ‘‘If I can do all this from a little dinky office with no funding,’ he exclaims, ‘imagine what the FBI could do!’’
    • ‘When I recently rammed the rear of a dinky Toyota on the Ventura Freeway, I bent it up pretty badly.’
    • ‘We drove over and found a somewhat dinky little dirt park adjoining a railroad track.’
    • ‘That's why Curtis has the least powerful computer at Merrill Lynch on his desk, along with a dinky monitor.’
    • ‘This isn't a dinky log jump we're talking about; it's big air with even bigger consequences, so you've got to be certain you can clear the gap before you launch.’
    • ‘Indeed, almost three decades on, his gift for moving is so astonishing that he makes Longborough's dinky stage feel ten times the size it is.’
    • ‘Of course I mean more than a small dinky deposit, anyone with some geological training or even studying can figure out probable areas where there might be a deposit.’
    • ‘After the heroic installations of Judd, Flavin and Andre on the lower floors of the Guggenheim, McCollum's modestly sized, wall-mounted works looked, well, dinky.’
    • ‘Our daughter lives with us, not some teacher and her husband in a dinky apartment!’
    • ‘Are we going to be living in some small, dinky shack with no running water and a cast iron cauldron for cooking?’
    • ‘I gripped my dinky plastic fork we were supplied with by the mean cafeteria ladies in my hand; I was very tempted to just stab her.’
    • ‘How in the world could a school with such a dinky gym ever help a league with big-time aspirations?’

Origin

Late 18th century: from Scots and northern English dialect dink ‘neat, trim’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

dinky

/ˈdiNGkē//ˈdɪŋki/

Main definitions of dinky in US English:

: dinky1dinky2

dinky2

noun

informal
  • A partner in a well-off working couple with no children.

    • ‘"They're dinkies," Doyle nodded across the aisle.’
    • ‘They're dinkies, and she works on lots of temporary contracts so she gets to spend a lot of the winter up there.’
    • ‘No kiddies, old man. Not yet, anyway. Just a couple dinkies, that's us.’

Origin

1980s: acronym from double income, no kids, on the pattern of yuppy.

Pronunciation

dinky

/ˈdɪŋki//ˈdiNGkē/