Definition of dime in English:

dime

noun

North american
  • 1A ten-cent coin.

    • ‘Pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters were carefully counted.’
    • ‘She's more fond of pennies and dimes than quarters.’
    • ‘The first day he had poured out his accumulated pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters onto the table in front of his sister, his face had beamed with pride at his contribution.’
    • ‘If Jimmy saves 4 dimes in his piggy bank every day, how many dimes will he save in five days?’
    • ‘Using the same group of coins, help your child make a pile of pennies to equal a nickel, nickels to equal a dime, and so on.’
    • ‘It has separate pouches for pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters.’
    • ‘My son collects my change - the random coins that come from little daily transactions, the pennies, nickels and dimes that build up in my pockets.’
    • ‘You have five quarters, two nickels, three dimes and a penny in your pocket.’
    • ‘Here we have ten coins: pennies, nickels, and dimes.’
    • ‘The woman's face fell as Anne counted out exact change from her mass of nickels, dimes, pennies, and quarters.’
    • ‘Then try alternating pennies and dimes and see what happens.’
    • ‘People often count change by grouping pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters, a tendency indicating that, without practice, working memory can deal with only one item at a time.’
    • ‘Suddenly, the nickels, dimes, pennies, and quarters started flying.’
    • ‘Instead of replacing the popular dime with another coin, it's also possible to see whether the addition of a fifth coin would help.’
    • ‘Now bring something else to the community or stop asking us to spend our hard earned pennies, nickels and dimes to buy this type of trash.’
    • ‘Staring down into it you could see the shiny bronze pennies and silver dimes lying at the bottom.’
    • ‘And then she came and sat with me, next to a reflection pool that had been emptied of water, but whose cement floor was scattered with pennies and dimes turned blue from chlorine.’
    • ‘For the change-making task, three quarters, seven dimes, and seven nickels are placed in front of the patient, who then is asked to provide one dollar in change.’
    • ‘I supposed it was good that he'd paid because I only had a loonie and a dime in my pocket.’
    • ‘She began digging through her cracked plastic coin purse, slapping quarters and dimes on the counter.’
    1. 1.1informal A small amount of money.
      ‘he didn't have a dime’
      • ‘He stops speaking to May and refuses to contribute a dime to her education.’
      • ‘But its minority investors never saw a dime in profit.’
      • ‘Without a dime of government money we are turning thousands of people per month into independent homeowners.’
      • ‘Any money goes to people who previously bought the stock for pennies; the company doesn't get a dime.’
      • ‘That's a lot of loot for a pair of companies that have yet to make a dime in profits.’
      • ‘The exact economics may be beyond me, but I suspect neither one of us will be saving a dime on this tax cut.’
      • ‘Inspectors have the right to pop any locks (and you won't get a dime in compensation; they're allowed to do it by law).’
      • ‘The vast majority of dot-coms will never see a dime of profits.’
      • ‘Not a dime of the money stays where it nominally is.’
      • ‘I'm an outsider, un-American for not contributing a dime to the $40-billion-a-year diet industry.’
      • ‘The hub deal especially contrasts with the down-and-dirty business of having to bet a billion dollars on a vehicle program that may never produce a dime of profits.’
      • ‘After all, no matter who goes first overall or who slides into the second half of the first round, you're not going to see a dime of that money, and neither am I.’
      • ‘Even if you never spend a dime of the reserve, the tax savings on your contributions ensure you'll be no worse off than if you hadn't enrolled.’
      • ‘We bought our house by borrowing $100,000 from his parents' retirement fund and have not paid back a dime - another nightmare.’
      • ‘The two things people need to keep in mind is that we are talking small amounts of money and you cannot afford to lose a dime.’
      • ‘They hardly spent a dime, whereas I spent money so fast, I almost ran out of credit cards.’
      • ‘He figured that he might as well live till the whole sham is over, this way he won't have to spend a dime of his new found, hard earned money.’
      • ‘Why did so many investors put so much money behind so many companies that had never made a dime?’
      • ‘Sure, he got his contingency fee, but the families wouldn't have gotten a dime without his help, and in many cases, they would need millions to care for their chronically ill children.’
      • ‘‘This has been a large front-end expenditure for us before we even see a dime of revenues from the settlement,’ he says.’
    2. 1.2informal
      short for dime bag

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French disme, from Latin decima pars tenth part The word originally denoted a tithe or tenth part; the modern sense ten-cent coin dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation:

dime

/dīm/