Main definitions of dike in English

: dike1dike2

dike1

(also dyke)

noun

  • 1A long wall or embankment built to prevent flooding from the sea.

    • ‘Ponds are separated by dikes that prevent flooding and provide access routes to the ponds for electricity and aerator motors.’
    • ‘The wall zone is about 2-5 cm thick, and the intermediate zone is about 1.5 meters in the thicker portion of the dike.’
    • ‘It's research that might benefit the Vancouver suburb of Richmond, which is reclaimed delta surround by a dike.’
    • ‘This dike, in the vicinity where Richardson had mined high-grade gold ore, was believed to have had a damming effect on the ore solutions.’
    • ‘Sixty-six houses were flooded in Kostinbrod as well as part of the Roma neighbourhood in Ihtiman, Western Bulgaria where a dike burst and flooded the area.’
    • ‘He is remembered as a benevolent ruler who increased agricultural production and built dams, dikes, and bridges for the Vietnamese people.’
    • ‘Much of the western part of the country is polders (low-lying lands) that have been reclaimed from the sea by dikes and dunes.’
    • ‘The local administration is planning to deepen the Telomoyo River in the regency and build dikes to prevent or limit future flooding.’
    • ‘In some reaches the river bed is more than 10 meters above the surrounding farm lands, necessitating the costly raising and strengthening of flood protection dikes.’
    • ‘The area flanks Lake Pontchartrain and suffered from floods when a canal dike burst.’
    • ‘The Fayum oasis was one of the richest agricultural areas of Egypt, an area of newly arable land created by controlling the Nile's floods with canals and dikes, starting around 350 B.C.’
    • ‘The silty river's dikes often tower above the surrounding farmland, which account for 15% of China's arable land.’
    • ‘In 1852, the Yellow River broke its banks, despite efforts by farmers to prevent this through the construction of huge dikes necessary to compensate for the silting up of the river.’
    • ‘The permanent marker etched into a pillar at The Forkssome seven feet off the ground at that point provides a sobering measure of just how high the water could have come had the dikes been breached.’
    • ‘This location lies in the outer edge of the ring dike of the Lake George intrusive center approximately 0.5 mile northeast of the town of Lake George.’
    • ‘In some cases, concrete and stone retaining walls and dikes are erected along banks to stave off overflow in heavy rain.’
    • ‘But they say the dikes could not be easily broken to flood the fields when needed - and now the rivers are too low to get the water where it's needed.’
    • ‘Other options for containment include concrete walls or earthen dikes and liners.’
    • ‘As they camped in the fields in sight of the city walls the Mongols surprised them by smashing the dams and dikes nearby and flooding the encampment.’
    • ‘Almost one-quarter of the landmass is below sea level, protected from the encroaching sea by dikes and dunes.’
    1. 1.1 (often in place names) a low wall or earthwork serving as a boundary or defense.
      ‘Offa's Dike’
      • ‘The busy prehistory is known rather than seen in the shadow remnants of dikes and earthworks.’
    2. 1.2 A causeway.
      • ‘After that, she led us along a thin, icy path on a dike between the channel and a deep, muddy ditch with (I don't know why) sharp sticks (the remains of a fence?) jutting up from the bottom.’
    3. 1.3Geology An intrusion of igneous rock cutting across existing strata.
      Compare with sill
      • ‘The minerals for which the area is so well known are found in small pegmatite dikes that open into vugs or miarolitic cavities, usually called ‘pockets’ by local collectors.’
      • ‘Evidently, the wealth of minerals found at Brumado is related to the intrusion of igneous dikes and subsequent associated hydrothermal mineralization.’
      • ‘These rocks are cut by a number of felsic and mafic dikes.’
      • ‘A granite dike, on the other hand, can give only a minimum age for the rock that the dike cuts across.’
      • ‘The Ajax vein structure contains both a mineralized quartz vein and brecciated mafic dike.’
  • 2A ditch or watercourse.

    • ‘At the same time, the construction of canals, ditches and dikes essential to irrigation demanded cooperation between different social groups.’
    • ‘The dikes here are three parallel ditches and mounds, the whole 50 yards across, the ditches ten foot deep, very regular, very impressive, but overgrown.’
    • ‘But we will have to begin digging a great earthen dike outside the wall, immediately, and another outside that, ringed with pickets.’
    • ‘Huge platforms had been prepared and buried under cover of darkness which would soon serve as bridges over the dike and across the huge water filled ditch.’
    • ‘The engineers called for pumping stations, dikes, and many more ditches.’
    • ‘Also, the terrain ahead of the second Army's thrust, rivers, marshes, dikes, canals and lowlands, was extremely difficult, as the British well knew from Dutch reports.’
    • ‘The ditches, dikes and reed-edged fleets that crisscross the grazing marshes here are rich in invertebrates, including the scarce emerald damselfly.’
    • ‘Therefore, if runoff can be diverted away from it with dikes and interception ditches, sediment transport can be reduced.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]often as adjective diked
  • Provide (land) with a wall or embankment to prevent flooding.

    • ‘The diked and filled wetland proved incapable of growing grain, and ironically now has been turned into a ‘theme park’ displaying the ‘traditional’ lives of the non-Chinese minority peoples who live in Yunnan province.’
    • ‘In 1968, a rock-filled dam with a flood control gate system was built in the upper estuary of the Petitcodiac River, New Brunswick, as a road connection and to protect diked farmland from flooding.’
    • ‘Eastward lay the Sonoma floodplain, an expanse of diked and drained bay lands, with tidal creeks and sloughs shining in the distance.’
    • ‘First of all, it is stored in a sealed clay or lined lagoon, which also happens to be diked about four or five feet above ground level.’
    • ‘By 1986, more than 95 percent of the wild rice harvested was grown not in natural lakes but diked paddies, most of them in northern California.’
    • ‘Westerner's perplexed by the artificiality of Hangzhou's dredged, diked and manipulated Xihu need only recall their own foundational myths.’
    • ‘The village community, through voluntary labor, create diked pastures on rectangular plots of land, called chaukas, to store the rainwater.’
    • ‘With the exception of one trap, all traps that captured large numbers of flies were located within or near the diked, agricultural lands in Grand Pré.’

Phrases

  • put one's finger in the dike

    • Attempt to stem the advance of something undesirable.

      • ‘Don't let people criticise you for this - after all, the hurricane was over and what the heck could you do, put your finger in the dike?’
      • ‘Sometimes it's hard to put your finger in the dyke when you are sitting in the stand, but we certainly did things that we didn't do in practice and we haven't done in the rest of the tournament.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting a trench or ditch): from Old Norse dík, related to ditch. dike (sense 1 of the noun) has been influenced by Middle Low German dīk ‘dam’ and Middle Dutch dijc ‘ditch, dam’.

Pronunciation

dike

/dīk//daɪk/

Main definitions of dike in English

: dike1dike2

dike2

noun

  • variant spelling of dyke

Pronunciation

dike

/dīk//daɪk/