Definition of diffusionist in English:

diffusionist

adjective

Anthropology
  • Advocating the theory of the dissemination of elements of culture to another region or people.

    ‘the rural sociological literature of the diffusionist school’
    • ‘It implied a diffusionist view of history whereby high civilization was brought from the Fertile Crescent and then made its way down to the Lower Nile Valley by white or near-whites of the Caucasian family.’
    • ‘In the same year, the Englishman William Rivers discarded evolutionism in favour of diffusionist theories to explain the historical spread of customs and belief systems.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, conceptions of Australian science have largely remained bound by the top-down perspective assumed by the diffusionist model.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the lack of such ethnography has not stopped scholars from attempting to explain away divination by placing it within evolutionist, diffusionist, ecological, or functionalist theories.’
    • ‘Her theories are reminiscent of the diffusionist theories that argue that Native Americans were descended from the lost tribes of Israel, the Welsh, the Phoenicians, the Egyptians, and/or the Chinese.’

noun

Anthropology
  • An advocate of the theory of the dissemination of elements of culture to another region or people.

    • ‘He was a ‘diffusionist’, and through his studies he attempted to illustrate how and why similar games appear in different cultures.’
    • ‘He was a diffusionist, plain and simple.’
    • ‘Imaginative diffusionists used such similarities to speculate on the origins of the Maya.’

Pronunciation:

diffusionist

/dəˈfyo͞oZHənəst/