Definition of die-off in English:

die-off

noun

  • 1A period in which a significant proportion of a population dies naturally, usually within a short time.

    • ‘That makes the famous mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs some 65 million years ago seem like a minor die-off.’
    • ‘Since the Cambrian period, we have only die-off and no new groups coming about, ever.’
    • ‘Disproportionate mortality between males and females among all 1 + yr old caribou, and between bulls and cows during the interim three years of die-off, was also tested using chi-square.’
    • ‘They do not appear to do well in harsh winters, and die-offs are often observed in severe winters, which may limit their numbers in some parts of Washington.’
    • ‘She attributes the decline in plants such as eelgrass to pollution, high-speed water traffic and natural cyclic die-offs.’
    • ‘Two major die-offs among perch 100 mm were both followed by strong recruitment.’
    • ‘Regardless of what caused them though, the die-offs, like the victims were colossal.’
    • ‘This is strong evidence that these eruptions caused, at least in part, the global die-off, which some scientists have ascribed to a meteor impact.’
    • ‘We're witnessing one of the greatest (if that's the right word to use) die-offs this planet has ever seen.’
    • ‘So the earth, and the human species, could probably survive a pretty large die-off.’
    • ‘Their populations fluctuate because of winter die-offs in particularly cold years, but the Breeding Bird Survey has not detected any significant, long-term population changes in Washington.’
    • ‘These major die-offs will continue to occur at unpredictable intervals when the most extensive, persistent, extremely unfavourable snow and ice conditions prevail.’
    • ‘20 years ago, the world's panda population was feared to have fallen to around 1,000, their numbers depleted by low fertility, illegal logging, poaching and periodic die-offs of their staple food, bamboo.’
    • ‘Sixty-five million years ago, a collision with an asteroid is believed to have caused a global die-off that included all dinosaurs.’
    • ‘Their research on carbonate-rich sediments in which the dinosaurs were buried suggests the area was near or in a spring, and that there were at least two mass die-offs.’
    • ‘Texas coastal marine life - fish, crab, marine turtles, shrimp, etc. - can suffer extensive die-offs if unusually cold weather strikes the bays and lingers.’
    • ‘A basis of the theory is the belief that the ancient animal die-offs coincided with the migration of the first large human populations into North America.’
    • ‘The theory implies, but does not ever really try to prove, that the dates the supposed mutations occurred have some timing connection with the dates of population die-offs and the appearance in the fossil record of new body forms.’
    • ‘Few species or sites have recovered, and carpets of algae - flourishing in the aftermath of overfishing and die-offs of sea urchins and other algae-eaters - now dominate many Caribbean reefs.’
    • ‘Yet it is plausible for the Eared Grebe because, except for large but irregular die-offs involving losses to disease and migration, annual mortality appears to be low.’
    1. 1.1 A process causing this.
      • ‘Biologists fear the die-offs will further degrade coral reefs in the Caribbean, a region that by one estimate has already lost 80 percent of its coral cover over the last three decades.’
      • ‘Researchers say they have yet to gauge the full extent of the die-off.’
      • ‘As aquatic vegetation decomposes, either as a result of herbicide use or natural die-off, the process uses oxygen.’
      • ‘A month later, the sober rats had lost about half of those new cells through normal die-off.’
      • ‘Once a trigger mechanism sets the process of a die-off in motion, he adds, common organisms become massive killers.’
      • ‘During the course of the study, two major die-offs took place, selectively affecting larger cannibalistic individuals, followed by several years of successful recruitment of young fish.’
      • ‘Ichthyosaurs gradually disappear from the fossil record of about 90 million years ago, a full 25 million years before mass die-offs wiped out the dinosaurs.’
    2. 1.2 The death of a significant proportion of a population in this way.
      • ‘If global warming shrinks the ranges of species until they go extinct, then shouldn't massive die-offs have happened 11, 500 years ago?’
      • ‘As news about global warming, genetically modified foods, meat scares and massive wildlife die-offs become more prevalent, people have begun to hear more of the voices calling for change.’
      • ‘There is evidence of a long-term decline in the West, and large die-offs were observed in the early 1990s at coastal reefs in southeastern Alaska.’
      • ‘The U.S. Global Change Research Program blames coastal runoff for beach closings, coral reef die-offs and ‘dead zones,’ including the New Jersey-sized expanse choking out life in the Gulf of Mexico.’
      • ‘There weren't many major die-offs, but I do think in some areas habitat quality is diminished from prestorm conditions.’
      • ‘But he thinks that in coastal California the ecological damage from large die-offs of oaks could surpass the harm caused by chestnut blight back east.’
      • ‘The deaths have alarmed conservationists and triggered investigations, but the exact cause of the mysterious die-offs remains unknown.’
      • ‘Transmission of diseases such as avian influenza, salmonensis, and avian cholera could lead to massive die-offs of urban and wild Canada geese and other species.’
      • ‘During the past six years, salt marshes in the southeastern United States - in Georgia and Louisiana especially - have experienced unprecedented die-offs.’
      • ‘Some of the Indian tribes in the Brazilian interior were well aware that massive die-offs from disease often followed contact with Europeans, and some of them would club explorers to death rather than introduce them to their villages.’
      • ‘Red tide algal blooms - sudden, massive growths of algae - are known to cause massive fish die-offs, and often prompt authorities to shut down beaches and shellfish beds.’
      • ‘The researchers' analysis led them to conclude that such targeted immunizations can prevent major die-offs in wild Ethiopian wolves.’
      • ‘In addition, mussels' lack of mobility renders them susceptible to massive die-offs from acute stresses, such as chemical spills.’
      • ‘Research by these scientists and others has identified many deadly viral infections as well as the chytrid fungus as factors in some amphibian die-offs and population declines.’
      • ‘The authors conclude that recent marine ecosystem collapses, including die-offs of seagrass beds, kelp forests and coral reefs, often had their origins decades or even centuries earlier.’
      • ‘It causes die-offs of plankton and fish and affects Pacific jet stream winds, altering storm tracks and creating unusual weather patterns in various parts of the world.’
      • ‘Day after day they kept washing up; by the third day, biologists were estimating that 33,000 fish had been killed in one of the largest salmon die-offs in U.S. history.’
      • ‘At the same time, seabird populations have suffered large die-offs, crab and shrimp populations have crashed, unusual algae have bloomed, sea ice has shrunk, and gray whales have washed up dead.’
      • ‘Scientifically speaking, the last die-off technically ended on Jan. 5 because no new deaths were reported in the two weeks following that date.’
      • ‘Either periodic passage of the solar system through molecular clouds or periodic massive volcanic eruptions could be behind the massive die-offs.’