Definition of devotion in English:

devotion

noun

  • 1Love, loyalty, or enthusiasm for a person, activity, or cause.

    ‘his courage and devotion to duty never wavered’
    ‘Eleanor's devotion to her husband’
    • ‘The author's research skills and his devotion to accuracy befit a serious academic monograph.’
    • ‘They concentrated on his childhood, his professional success in the City, and his devotion as a son and brother.’
    • ‘His devotion to the cause was illustrated during the national team's ill-fated Far East tour.’
    • ‘I ditched my leather shoes and even, gulp, drank soy milk in my total devotion to her ideals.’
    • ‘I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle.’
    • ‘Their devotion, if extreme, is driven by one goal to reclaim their neighbourhood.’
    • ‘Her earnest belief in devotion to duty and her command of French bring her an offer to join the intelligence service.’
    • ‘His devotion to the only government job he ever wanted is not in doubt.’
    • ‘The players all gather around a few microphones and let their skill and devotion to the music do the rest.’
    • ‘To achieve this, we will have to put an end to our single minded devotion to material pursuits.’
    • ‘Mom gave her unconditional love and devotion to each and every one of her children.’
    • ‘It inspired a level of devotion from its fans that verged on the religious.’
    • ‘He took care for her never to be left alone while he travelled, and in her last years he nursed her with great devotion.’
    • ‘In our slavish devotion to pop culture, is there any hope of taming the monster of celebrity?’
    • ‘Others say his devotion to Korean farmers was so passionate that he would willingly have laid down his life for them.’
    • ‘The virtue of a talented woman lies in her devotion to her studies, not her looks.’
    • ‘After years of devotion to perfecting his art, it is no wonder Jiggy takes his career to heart.’
    • ‘They'd spot my fascination for Hollywood's formative years, and my devotion to the novel.’
    • ‘Only the British public, with our slavish devotion to high-street spending, hold the key.’
    • ‘But to do it requires strong devotion from the bottom of our heart and from the marrow of our bones.’
    loyalty, faithfulness, fidelity, trueness, staunchness, steadfastness, constancy, commitment, adherence, allegiance, dedication, devoutness
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    1. 1.1 Religious worship or observance.
      ‘the order's aim was to live a life of devotion’
      • ‘Olympian fields were as much temples for religious devotion as sports complexes.’
      • ‘The clear implication here is that yoga can be a form of devotion, or worship.’
      • ‘The exterior nature of the liturgy helps to kindle in us a strong interior faith and devotion.’
      • ‘A prayer book which was offered symbolised our devotion and thanks to God for his goodness.’
      • ‘In some cases, these ideas evolve into a symbolically charged moment of private religious devotion.’
      • ‘In between their hours of devotion they discussed Cicero, St Paul, and Neoplatonic themes.’
      • ‘Benigno is a nurse who tends to a young woman with an almost religious devotion.’
      • ‘In front of these symbols, we place offerings that are an expression of our devotion.’
      • ‘They are all integral parts of church interiors and of the Orthodox liturgy and private devotion.’
      • ‘There were also new forms of devotion as well and they emerge as new forms of piety.’
      • ‘They call it the wailing wall, but the only act of devotion on this west London street corner is to mammon not God.’
      • ‘He habitually revealed that reverence for God which in Jewish devotion is the natural climax of true piety.’
      • ‘We have lost this commitment to the delights of the Word of God, the joy of our devotion.’
      • ‘Much of Abu Hurayrah's time would be spent in spiritual exercises and devotion to Allah.’
      • ‘What is the role of ideological or religious devotion in terrorism and violence in general?’
      • ‘He is one of the most popular objects of devotion and reverence in east Asian Buddhism.’
      • ‘So I could figure out that all religions were good and bringing the same type of devotion.’
      • ‘Bhakti yoga is the yoga of devotion, while Raja yoga is the yoga of meditation.’
      • ‘The Wesleys understood the use of hymns for popular devotion and instruction.’
      • ‘A canon of Seville Cathedral and renowned for his devotion and learning, Neve was a major patron of the artist.’
      devoutness, piety, religiousness, spirituality, godliness, holiness, sanctity, saintliness
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    2. 1.2devotions Prayers or religious observances.
      • ‘Leading opening devotions, chairing the discussion, and leading closing prayer are rotated among committee members.’
      • ‘Not a single day passed that he didn't spend time in prayer and in private devotions with God.’
      • ‘In fact, it is so short that, in its Chinese translation, it is memorized by Chinese monks and nuns and recited daily as part of morning devotions.’
      • ‘After only three years her natural frailty and the rigours of her ascetic devotions killed her.’
      • ‘There was Rosary in the church on Sunday evening and devotions including Evening Prayer was held on Tuesday.’
      • ‘We have breakfast in the dining hall but first we have our devotions, which are prayers to say thank you for our food.’
      • ‘Susannah soon put a woman's touch to the hotel rooms, especially the sitting room where Spurgeon led morning devotions and the Lord's Supper on Sunday afternoons.’
      • ‘I quote an account of a compilation of ‘Celtic’ prayers and devotions, published in 1994.’
      • ‘Personal devotions, meditations or prayer may refresh introverts.’
      • ‘Workshops and luncheons abound, but this conference also boasts prayer meetings, devotions and music showcases.’
      • ‘In 1937 he settled at Le Vésinet on the outskirts of Paris and in his final years gave as much time to religious devotions as to painting.’
      • ‘Pious and private devotions more encouraged than scripture.’
      • ‘It had been an emotionally stressful week, and without her daily devotions and prayer time, she could definitely feel the difference.’
      • ‘After a day of prayer and devotions on Tuesday, the relics will return to Fairview church on Tuesday night.’
      • ‘Until his death, on November 16th, 1272, the King continued to rule and to conduct his customary religious devotions.’
      • ‘These include three religious groups with special devotions, an ethnic association, and a musical society.’
      • ‘Clearly, the polylingual devotions and prayers associated with Elizabeth are not ‘hers,’ in the sense that their authorship is a given.’
      • ‘Temple worship, rituals, sacraments as well as personal devotions create a communion with the devas and God.’
      • ‘In addition to the seven devotions, the CD has Scripture readings, prayers, hymns and church information.’
      • ‘The image or icon of worship is a focus for our prayers and devotions.’
      religious worship, worship, religious observance
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Latin devotio(n-), from devovere ‘consecrate’ (see devote).

Pronunciation

devotion

/dəˈvoʊʃ(ə)n//dəˈvōSH(ə)n/