Definition of deprogram in English:

deprogram

Pronunciation /dēˈprōˌɡram//-ɡrəm/

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Release (someone) from apparent brainwashing, typically that of a religious cult, by the systematic reindoctrination of conventional values.

    • ‘If you really want to move on with your life, you must deprogram yourself. To begin, assess the situation.’
    • ‘Marge tries her hand at deprogramming after her family is brainwashed by a religious cult.’
    • ‘How do I tell them about my religious practices and my choice to go ‘public’ without them trying to have me committed and deprogrammed?’
    • ‘The problem with him was that he'd been deprogrammed.’
    • ‘Or should I work on deprogramming myself from discomfort related to thoughts?’
    • ‘It's like dealing with a cult member - you have to engage in deprogramming before you can even get a person to see logic.’
    • ‘So before they ship out, the Marines are undertaking what amounts to a massive deprogramming campaign for their own troops.’
    • ‘I think that there should be a period of ‘cooling off’, or deprogramming that is mandatory before soldiers who have seen combat are returned to society.’
    • ‘Must every religious convert be deprogrammed?’
    • ‘Her family panic and lure her home to be deprogrammed by an exit counsellor from the States.’
    • ‘Thankfully several of my friends got me out and deprogrammed from the brainwashing I had been through.’
    • ‘It isn't a matter of informing the mind, but of deprogramming the body.’
    • ‘Then deprogramme yourself if you think you want to be rid of this kind attitude.’
    • ‘It takes seven weeks of hard work to train recruiters to become better public speakers and deprogram them a little bit out of their Corps habits so they can be more approachable to young, impressionable civilians.’
    • ‘To attempt to deprogram those who have been lured away is not nearly enough.’

Pronunciation

deprogram

/dēˈprōˌɡram//-ɡrəm/