Definition of dental in English:

dental

adjective

  • 1attributive Relating to the teeth.

    ‘dental health’
    • ‘This revolution has transpired partly through advances in dental science and a greater awareness of the importance of oral health through dental education.’
    • ‘Limiting intake of sugary foods and regular brushing and flossing all contribute to your child's dental health.’
    • ‘Call the doctor or dentist if you have questions or concerns about your child's teeth, gums, or dental health.’
    • ‘Before discussing what would constitute dental neglect, basic needs for dental health should be discussed.’
    • ‘The second phase consists of the removal of extra teeth, the insertion of dental implants if teeth are missing, and the straightening of teeth using braces.’
    • ‘It lies between the outer enamel and the innermost core of the tooth called the dental pulp.’
    • ‘Oral health is influenced by dental plaque, the oral microbial flora, and oral immunity.’
    • ‘A proxy for dental health, using the number of trips to the dentist in the past two years, was utilized.’
    • ‘The care and cleaning of your baby's teeth is important for long-term dental health.’
    • ‘This diet seems to help prevent common rabbit health problems such as dental disease and gastrointestinal problems.’
    • ‘Sometimes dental plates can be used to seal the palate and help the baby feed better.’
    • ‘Children whose teeth fall out early due to decay, may not have straight adult teeth and require a dental brace.’
    • ‘Continuing dryness of the mouth may increase the chance of dental disease, including tooth decay, gum disease, and fungus infections.’
    • ‘Skeletal and dental evidence indicates good health, while the high levels of nitrogen isotopes present in human remains indicates a diet rich in protein.’
    • ‘There's quite a lot of literature that goes back even to the '40s on the association of the consumption of dairy products with low experience of tooth decay or dental caries.’
    • ‘And despite all the good news about dental health, tooth decay remains one of the most common diseases of childhood.’
    • ‘Fluoride can considerably benefit dental health by strengthening the tooth enamel, making it more resistant to acid attacks that can cause tooth decay.’
    • ‘Good dental health is vital for a general sense of well being and the arrival of toothache often heralds two kinds of pain - physical and financial.’
    • ‘If a child has a dental injury to a milk tooth then the treatment that he or she receives may be different.’
    • ‘In spite of these improvements in dental health, teeth are still extracted because of decay.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to dentistry.
      ‘dental councils’
      • ‘With today's advances in modern dentistry, dental surgery has also advanced considerably to make the procedure nearly painless.’
      • ‘Mild-mannered yet talkative dental supplies salesman, Andy goes to Detroit to give a speech at a dental convention.’
      • ‘It also seeks to improve the quality of dental professionalism, while offering a structured continuing dental education for students to learn and practice.’
      • ‘Our results, therefore, suggest that fluorosis is not a public health problem in this community - but dental caries are.’
      • ‘Community efforts to reduce tobacco use and access to dental services also prevent tooth loss.’
      • ‘Patients are instructed that when they visit the dentist for cleanings or dental work during the next two years, they should take prophylactic antibiotics.’
      • ‘The national health expenditure for dental services is expected to exceed $60 billion in 2000.’
      • ‘If your child wears braces, a retainer, or other orthodontics, ask the orthodontist about dental care.’
      • ‘It also allows for continuous training of dental staff.’
      • ‘The patient is instructed to take prophylactic antibiotics when he or she visits the dentist for cleanings or dental work in the two years after surgery.’
      • ‘A review of dental and periodontal literature was necessary before we could develop a comprehensive definition of oral care hygiene.’
      • ‘The dental council began an investigation to see if law had been broken.’
      • ‘Many consumers are not aware that general dentists are legally capable of doing orthodontics after dental school.’
      • ‘Even leading dental authorities are having second thoughts.’
      • ‘Take your child for a first dental visit within six months of the first baby tooth and by no later than the first birthday.’
      • ‘Another hospital in our area was cited for not marking teeth for a dental procedure.’
      • ‘This laser is commonly used for dental procedures such as root canal therapy.’
      • ‘Physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dental services, speech therapy, podiatry are also available on the Ripon site.’
      • ‘Hypnosis has been shown to be effective in reducing needle phobia, even in stressful situations such as dental treatments or lumbar puncture.’
      • ‘For examination of the mucosa, dentures or other dental appliances may need to be removed.’
  • 2Phonetics
    (of a consonant) pronounced with the tip of the tongue against the upper front teeth (as th) or the alveolar ridge (as n, d, t).

    • ‘The sound that has yet to receive an official symbol is a ‘voiceless bilabial trill preceded by a dental stop, forming a single unit’.’
    • ‘The alliterating dental sounds clinch the sentence's dark sense.’

noun

Phonetics
  • A dental consonant.

    • ‘Dentals are primarily distinguished from sounds in which contact is made with the tongue and the gum ridge, as in English, due to the acoustic similarity of the sounds and the fact that in the Roman alphabet they are generally written using the same symbols.’
    • ‘In a variety of languages, either for the sake of euphony, or from caprice or accident, sibilant letters have been interchanged with dentals.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from late Latin dentalis, from Latin dens, dent- ‘tooth’.

Pronunciation

dental

/ˈden(t)l//ˈdɛn(t)l/