Definition of deniable in English:



  • Able to be denied.

    ‘the government did agree to play a limited and deniable role in the rebellion’
    • ‘However, that there is an opportunity to challenge sales proceedings and a limited discretion in the treasurer to determine whether to cancel the sale proceedings is not deniable.’
    • ‘The report, released last Thursday, admits what is no longer deniable and ignores everything else.’
    • ‘Whether the diseased organ was infectious or not is still subject to controversy: but that the surgery relieved untold suffering is only deniable by the terminally reality-challenged.’
    • ‘We hope for lives whose story leaves us looking admirable; we like our weaknesses to be hidden and deniable.’
    • ‘We may not know the precise mechanism of the conversion in question, but if we choose to adhere to the law of energy conservation, the mere fact of such conversion is hardly deniable.’
    • ‘Operations intended to be plausibly deniable usually end up as neither, and the Agency gets blamed for the unintended consequences.’
    • ‘How many other states could have been manipulated in plausibly deniable ways by corrupt officials?’
    • ‘These images, part of a larger exhibition of photos taken from 2001-2002, begin to put a face on their staggeringly large numbers and aim to make their situation less deniable and more real.’
    • ‘The concern is that a life insurance company might turn over individually deniable medical information about a consumer to a home lending or credit card subsidiary.’
    • ‘This appears to be a political decision taken on a deniable basis with no official documentation.’
    • ‘In other words, covert actions are deniable activities.’
    • ‘You have to have quite a few of these stories for it to work, but they're deniable.’
    • ‘It is hardly deniable that it is any day easier and quicker to type it out and send it, without worrying about the fact whether it will reach or be torn or stolen in the way.’
    • ‘It becomes possible to launch a plausibly deniable stealth attack.’
    • ‘They appear to be good faith efforts to deal with these problems, but from the result it's hardly deniable that the system failed disastrously.’
    • ‘But deniability, although it can be very useful, is also highly problematic for democracies, since deniable policies by definition lack the kind of accountability democracy requires.’
    • ‘Or on the other hand, from the governments' perspective should piracy be viewed as a handy but deniable mechanism for pressuring the software company's pricing downwards?’