Definition of demotion in English:

demotion

noun

  • Reduction in rank or status.

    [count noun] ‘too many demotions would weaken morale’
    • ‘This weekend he was adamant that there was no rift with his former master, but was mystified about his demotion to the ranks.’
    • ‘The two men also would face non-judicial punishments, which could include a loss of pay or demotion in rank.’
    • ‘His sentence by a special court-martial judge includes discharge for bad conduct and demotion to the lowest rank of private.’
    • ‘I don't claim that my demotion was the reason for the club's lack of success in my last two seasons there, it was definitely one of several links in the chain.’
    • ‘This demotion he accepted because it meant he still had a job at his beloved club but the move ‘hurt deep in the heart’.’
    • ‘The advisor threatened him with dishonourable discharge and demotion.’
    • ‘That can include demotion, firing or even being drummed out of the profession entirely.’
    • ‘However, it didn't take his demotion to substitute last night to make me think the prospects, personal and collective, aren't rosy.’
    • ‘Their local satraps were threatened with demotion and fines.’
    • ‘He accepts a demotion and other-than-honorable discharge in lieu of court martial.’
    • ‘The demotion will necessitate the indignity of having to qualify for next season's Champions League group stages.’
    • ‘I certainly wouldn't have picked her for the job, and even thought her marked for demotion or treading water.’
    • ‘If convicted, he faces up to seven years in a military prison, demotion and a dishonourable discharge.’
    • ‘That demotion, however, was a mere hiccup compared to some of the troubles experienced in previous decades.’
    • ‘They received sentences ranging from demotion to eight years in prison.’
    • ‘Gutwein, in particular, has gone to ground since his demotion.’
    • ‘Rather than letting the temporary demotion get him down, Davies instead used it for motivation.’
    • ‘Those who fail to satisfactorily complete such a program will be subject to dismissal or demotion.’
    • ‘Surely his extraordinary capacity to rise above the hurt and disappointment of demotion is his most admirable personal trait.’
    • ‘Getting a C means no bonus; two C's in a row is grounds for demotion or dismissal.’
    overthrow, overturning, toppling, downfall, removal from office, removal, unseating, dethronement, supplanting, displacement, dismissal, discharge, ousting, drumming out, throwing out, forcing out, driving out, expulsion, expelling, ejection, ejecting
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 20th century: from demote, on the pattern of promotion.

Pronunciation:

demotion

/dēˈmōSH(ə)n/