Definition of demonology in US English:

demonology

noun

  • The study of demons or demonic belief.

    • ‘Newspaper editor Laura Kincaid's investigation of the case and the small town uncovers a history of witchcraft and demonology.’
    • ‘This show could also be seen as addressing the rampant trend towards demonising the other in every conflict at all levels, which forces us to perceive the world through screens of demonology.’
    • ‘The work discusses many subjects including demonology, magnetism and the camera obscura.’
    • ‘Research for the Scottish Executive has fingered mean-spirited van drivers as the worst culprits in cutting up cyclists and blocking cycle lanes, with cab drivers not far behind in the pedal-power demonology.’
    • ‘I have studied nearly every book written on the subject of demonology and find that most scholars do not commit themselves.’
    • ‘The changing iconography of witchcraft seems to relate to another trend that only developed fully in the later sixteenth century, that of turning demonology into a kind of experimental science.’
    • ‘It is from the North, and Norse mythology that demonology develops.’
    • ‘While demonology may be the most dramatic, mediumship is also a form of necromancy, as is divination, which employs the use of spirit guides.’
    • ‘The courses, starting in February, will deal with demonology, the presence of the notion of the devil in sacred texts, and the pathology and medical treatment of people suffering from possession.’
    • ‘Since demonology is a qualified profession and is believed to be real by so many around the world, maybe there is a hint of truth in my family's fear.’
    • ‘The belief in mental illness, as something other than man's trouble in getting along with his fellow man, is the proper heir to the belief in demonology and witchcraft.’
    • ‘As Clark also emphasises, that debate placed demonology at the centre of many contemporary preoccupations about the nature of both the world and the divine purpose.’
    • ‘When hatred of foreign policies ignites into hatred of an entire people and their civilization, then thinking is dead and demonology lives.’
    • ‘I have added explanations for some of the questions raised by readers, including one from Dharmeshwaran Natesan about ‘the demonology of the time’ as it appeared in an article in The Hindu.’
    • ‘Medicine and witchcraft, pharmacology and demonology, reason and unreason struck an odd alliance.’
    • ‘Human health was left to supernatural powers and demonology.’
    • ‘Some of the essays deal with relatively specialized interests (such as, demonology or Marston's verse satire), and few engage with ‘big pictures’ or reflect on critical methodologies.’
    • ‘Asser ploughs on ever deeper into his demonology of the victims and sanitising of their aggressors.’
    • ‘When I told my mom I was studying demonology, she almost had a fit.’
    • ‘Cordelia interrupted, highly uninterested in Wesley's recent lecture involving his frightening, sometimes sad, demonology expertise.’

Pronunciation

demonology

/ˌdiməˈnɑlədʒi//ˌdēməˈnäləjē/