Definition of delirious in US English:

delirious

adjective

  • 1In an acutely disturbed state of mind resulting from illness or intoxication and characterized by restlessness, illusions, and incoherence of thought and speech.

    • ‘Attention is impaired, and a delirious person is difficult to engage in conversation and easily distracted by irrelevant stimuli.’
    • ‘Tell your doctor if you had a seizure or got delirious when you tried to stop drinking before.’
    • ‘His vision was dimming as the rock squeezed harder, his mind was almost delirious with the pain.’
    • ‘If left untreated, the patient may be highly agitated, develop insomnia, become delirious or go into a coma.’
    • ‘Sometimes she would have raging temperatures where she would become delirious, speaking nonsense, and not being fully aware of what was going on.’
    • ‘On the unit, he was agitated and delirious, undressing himself for several days.’
    • ‘Vivid hallucinations and delirious illusions may also occur.’
    • ‘Low doses of neuroleptics may be helpful in managing the agitation of a delirious patient temporarily.’
    incoherent, raving, babbling, irrational, hysterical, wild, feverish, frenzied
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    1. 1.1 In a state of wild excitement or ecstasy.
      ‘there was a great roar from the delirious crowd’
      • ‘When delirious crowds tore down the Berlin Wall in 1989 many hallucinated that a millennium of borderless freedom was at hand.’
      • ‘The figures ache with yearning yet wear expressions of thrilled surrender and delirious abandon.’
      • ‘I'm so flattered and pleased and delirious and overjoyed that my work has been received so positively by you all.’
      • ‘If, as the run continues, the company unleashes the wild rage of the underdog, it might well hit delirious, instead of merely amusing, heights.’
      • ‘The crowd went delirious and pointed with glee as the windscreen wiper machines bumped repeatedly into his contorted form and grew all the more confused.’
      • ‘He was feeling the most delirious thrill of joy, mixed with an agony of anticipation, and spiked with that most potent spice: fear.’
      • ‘Thus, the two sides to Neptune are rapture or despair, delirious happiness versus pain and confusion.’
      • ‘The crowd is delirious then a great hush - who will take it?’
      • ‘It requires delirious, wild optimism to believe madness on every continent will keep us safe indefinitely.’
      • ‘She had lived in the city too long, Emma thought, and open windows and wild, chirping night songs had made her delirious.’
      • ‘She had been delirious with excitement about the whole thing, from the moment they had been invited along.’
      • ‘And 180 km after starting we hit the finish line; elated, delirious, lots of emotion and not too much pain thankfully.’
      • ‘Raine covered her ears at the shrill sound, ducking away from the delirious crowd as best as she could.’
      • ‘Half the crowd erupted into delirious cheering and celebrating; the other half sitting silently in the stands.’
      • ‘While the penalty prompted singing and cheering from the crowd, the drop kick produced thunderous applause and brought a delirious crowd to their feet.’
      ecstatic, euphoric, elated, thrilled, overjoyed, beside oneself, walking on air, on cloud nine, on cloud seven, in seventh heaven, jumping for joy, in transports of delight, carried away, transported, rapturous, in raptures, exultant, jubilant, in a frenzy of delight, hysterical, wild with excitement, frenzied
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Pronunciation

delirious

/dəˈlirēəs//dəˈlɪriəs/