Definition of delinquency in US English:

delinquency

nounPlural delinquencies

  • 1Minor crime, especially that committed by young people.

    ‘social causes of crime and delinquency’
    • ‘While urban police are the public officials who most directly regulate juvenile crime and delinquency, their work has rarely been considered in histories of juvenile justice.’
    • ‘Media reports on youth crime and delinquency regularly paint a picture of undisciplined and dangerous young people with negative attitudes towards authority.’
    • ‘It regards lack of social control as a determinant of crime and delinquency, including runaway as an early sign.’
    • ‘The research center was launched to assist in the reduction of juvenile crime and delinquency in Texas, according to officials.’
    • ‘If this sort of relationship did not happen then maternal deprivation resulted which could lead to crime and delinquency.’
    • ‘The questionnaire consists of 64 items which fall under the following categories: serious crimes, delinquency, drug use, and school and family offenses.’
    • ‘Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, the police have been the foremost public authorities who regulate juvenile crime and delinquency.’
    • ‘There was a sentimental love for an old con, an eager romanticising of gaol and crime and social delinquency.’
    • ‘There was no crime or childhood delinquency on her record.’
    • ‘These are the girls who are vulnerable to getting caught in crime, delinquency and early sexuality.’
    • ‘These programs, called Blueprints, have been shown to reduce adolescent violent crime, aggression, delinquency, and substance abuse.’
    • ‘These expectations are consistent with the observation that departure from their own culture would increase the risk of crime and delinquency.’
    • ‘In some cases, relative income deprivation may also contribute to the growth of significant social problems, including crime, delinquency, and high rates of suicide and drug use.’
    • ‘A council has been blamed for a man's fall into delinquency and crime which led to a life sentence in prison.’
    • ‘Theorists should acknowledge the role and importance of the peer group in explanations of crime and delinquency.’
    • ‘In doing so, crime and delinquency are seen as the consequence of individual pathology and association with a ‘bad crowd.’’
    • ‘Crime and delinquency among our young people would have been at a minimum today if heads of all religious faiths and homes had the respect and admiration of those under their charge.’
    • ‘Gender is no barrier to delinquency and crime committed by youth.’
    • ‘The question on crime and delinquency was particularly nice.’
    • ‘Rather, both traditions framed crucial social policies in such areas as education, child welfare, delinquency, imprisonment, crime prevention, and mental health.’
    crime, wrongdoing, criminality, lawbreaking, lawlessness, misconduct, misbehaviour
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1formal Neglect of one's duty.
      ‘he relayed this in such a manner as to imply grave delinquency on the host's part’
      • ‘The folks at are charged with contributing to the delinquency of the film-makers, who were likely duped into believing this could become a satisfying monster movie.’
      negligence, dereliction of duty, remissness, neglectfulness, irresponsibility
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2US A failure to pay an outstanding debt.
      • ‘Rising delinquencies reduce cash inflow from debt payments and increase collection expenses.’
      • ‘In addition to getting a re-sale certificate, the buyer also should get a sales tax clearance, to avoid being stuck with the seller's sales tax delinquencies.’
      • ‘Other trust data confirm that most lenders faced rising charge-offs and delinquencies during November, providing strong confirmation of expanding subprime Credit card deterioration.’
      • ‘Still, it reported in a recent filing that it, too, is bracing for more delinquencies and charge-offs.’
      • ‘The next year, similar trends could see $15 million of delinquencies and losses.’
      • ‘Managed delinquencies declined from 4.97% to 4.80% during the quarter.’
      • ‘We expect a surge in credit card delinquencies going forward.’
      • ‘The three-year drop in mortgage rates has also offset the stagnant job market's effect on mortgage delinquencies.’
      • ‘However, an increase in total consumer debt increases revolving delinquencies.’
      • ‘Credit card delinquencies increased 26 basis points during the month to 5.30%, up from last year's 4.83%.’
      • ‘The following sections provide modeling examples at the local level for two distinct observations: personal bankruptcy and loan delinquencies.’
      • ‘Consumer lending was strong, but there were some increases in consumer and business loan delinquencies.’
      • ‘Loan delinquencies have steadily risen in the past 24 months, to the point where nearly 1 in 20 home loans is delinquent - one of the highest rates in the past decade.’
      • ‘This theorem accounts for both the unexplainable growth in outstandings and the lack of delinquencies!’
      • ‘That could lead to more mortgage delinquencies or defaults.’
      • ‘Today, despite record levels of additional Consumer Credit, we see rising delinquencies and charge-offs, particularly with the marginal ‘subprime’ lenders.’
      • ‘Managed delinquencies increased nine basis points sequentially to 4.88%, but were down 21 basis points year-over-year.’
      • ‘This is fine during boom times, but delinquencies and repossessions can soar when the economy declines, obviously rendering the lender less inclined to extend credit in the future.’
      • ‘Already, credit-card delinquencies are at record levels.’
      • ‘The empirical model for explaining delinquencies is similar to the one for explaining bankruptcies.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from ecclesiastical Latin delinquentia, from Latin delinquent- ‘offending’ (see delinquent).

Pronunciation

delinquency

/dəˈliNGkwənsē//dəˈlɪŋkwənsi/