Definition of deflate in English:

deflate

verb

  • 1with object Let air or gas out of (a tire, balloon, or similar object)

    ‘he deflated one of the tires’
    • ‘They are investigating the theory that the murderer may have deliberately deflated the tyre so that the mechanic would have to stay alone to fix it, giving the killer the chance to strike after everyone else had gone home.’
    • ‘When the talks broke down the angry workers barricaded senior management in their offices, deflated their car tyres and disconnected water to the city.’
    • ‘Mr Fournier will spend around three hours ascending in an enclosed lightweight gondola before deflating the balloon and parachuting back to earth in six minutes and 25 seconds.’
    • ‘The balloon is then deflated and removed, and the artery remains open.’
    • ‘Armed officers, who were lying in wait for the would-be raiders, disabled their van using Hatton rounds - bullets designed to deflate tyres with minimum damage.’
    • ‘That was his worst result for two years, but the 42 points Ambrose grabbed when he deflated his rear tyres and drove out of the bog could end up being crucial at season's end.’
    • ‘The farmer, a prominent opposition supporter, fled his Marondera homestead when youths attacked his car with clubs and iron bars and tried to deflate the tyres on Friday.’
    • ‘Stranded in the paddy field mud of the Winton track, Ambrose amazed fans by deflating his rear tyres to drive himself out of the bog and back into the race - but only after missing some 20 laps of the race.’
    • ‘Despite all four tyres being deflated, Marx continued until his car slid off the road.’
    • ‘Residents ran forth to meet the balloon, as the occupants deflated the balloon and descended from it.’
    • ‘After using the stinger to deflate all four tyres, we arrested one male in the car but the other two ran away.’
    • ‘The protesters deflated tyres of company buses at Devaiah Park, Rajajinagar and other parts of the City.’
    • ‘This design actually had advantages over later designs, as it would take more than one puncture to deflate the whole tyre.’
    • ‘It took police one and a half hours to extract the lorry by deflating its tyres.’
    • ‘The instructor pulled out the heat-escape panel at the top of the balloon to deflate it.’
    • ‘Just before we land, he pulls the rip cord, which opens the top of the balloon and deflates it behind us.’
    • ‘The front tyre was deflated and the wheel was buckled and pushed back.’
    • ‘After treatment is completed, the balloon is deflated and the catheter is withdrawn and discarded.’
    • ‘Three of the nursing director's car tyres were also deflated at the weekend and a wing mirror was broken off another staff member's car.’
    • ‘The rear passenger tyre was deflated, which might have been caused by the accident.’
    let down, empty the air out of, collapse, flatten, void
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    1. 1.1no object Be emptied of air or gas.
      ‘the balloon deflated’
      • ‘His cheeks deflated, like a balloon losing air.’
      • ‘Over time implants rupture or deflate, requiring additional surgeries.’
      • ‘The balloons tied to the gatepost are slowly deflating, but have yet to be removed.’
      • ‘Shapiro and colleagues present a case illustrating this problem and provide a review of the literature about managing retained Foley catheters caused by balloons that will not deflate.’
      • ‘The seat is fitted with a number of air cushions, which inflate or deflate automatically to adjust to the current driving situation.’
      • ‘The fury of the wind and water caused his shirt to billow - to inflate and deflate like a balloon.’
      • ‘Because the only other explanation is that the third balloon appeared there recently, deflated like the others, faded like the others, and caught in the same cluster of branches.’
      • ‘Early flights were brief because the balloons quickly deflated.’
      • ‘And as if by magic, all the balloons immediately drooped, deflated.’
      • ‘Eight balloons were still inflated and three had deflated.’
      • ‘As the bouncy castle's palm tree began to deflate, the crowds returned to their offices with a faint whiff of mint lingering in the air.’
      • ‘If you've ever noticed how quickly a helium filled balloon deflates overnight you'll understand the effect of tiny molecules stored under pressure in leaky containers.’
      • ‘The AAIB report says the balloon deflated over the wires.’
      • ‘Better-engineered spigots prevent air from entering the bag when you fill your glass - the bag deflates like a balloon - so the wine stays fresh.’
      • ‘The normally stable alveoli that change volume minimally during ventilation become unstable inflating and deflating with each breath, similar to a balloon.’
      • ‘His burial shroud deflates as he rises and walks off to the sound of martial drums.’
      • ‘The balloon deflated over the wires resulting in a short circuit to the electricity supply.’
      • ‘‘You can think of a magma chamber as a balloon inflating and deflating,’ says Pritchard.’
      go down, collapse, shrink, contract, flatten
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  • 2Cause (someone) to suddenly lose confidence or feel less important.

    ‘the news left him feeling utterly deflated’
    • ‘It's odd that that should deflate me the way it does.’
    • ‘He's a confident character; nothing seems to deflate him.’
    • ‘Somehow, hearing the understanding in his voice seemed to deflate her.’
    • ‘When you are being a flaming jerk and your friend, who knows this, gives you ‘the look,’ it deflates you just a little bit.’
    • ‘I was deflated a bit and things suddenly seemed really awkward.’
    • ‘It completely deflated the woman, who went to trim her magnolias.’
    • ‘A great shot, magnificently saved, which deflated the English crowd.’
    • ‘Deanna's calmness had completely deflated me by now.’
    • ‘‘When Derby County pipped us to the title one year, we were so deflated,’ he recalls.’
    • ‘It was a nice gesture - because after the Lord's Test we were too deflated to do the same.’
    • ‘Each learned in her own way how to confront her husband about his shortcomings, limitations, or failures without compounding them or deflating him.’
    • ‘It was a stunning loss because one moment it seemed as if we had it won - then, bang, we were deflated.’
    • ‘He was totally deflated by this remark and conceded defeat.’
    • ‘Michael was deflated when he saw the ashamed look on his father's face.’
    • ‘But the futility of such a debate deflates me before I start.’
    • ‘Her unexpected acquiescence completely deflated him.’
    • ‘She was deflated when the person on the other line told her that Kiefer was not in.’
    subdue, humble, cow, humiliate, mortify, chasten, chagrin, dispirit, dismay, discourage, dishearten
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    1. 2.1 Reduce the level of (an emotion or feeling)
      ‘her anger was deflated’
      • ‘Complaining deflates morale, makes you look weak, and creates an environment that breeds negativity like a contagion.’
      • ‘My pride is instantly deflated and I feel insulted, but I continue because my drive is not financial.’
      • ‘For male pride, I am glad to say I caught the most - 96 carp, but my ego is deflated when admitting that the weight was less, 17061b.’
      • ‘Their armed forces were crippled and the country's morale was vastly deflated.’
      • ‘Getting where they're coming from will probably deflate your anger, so you'll have a better chance of expressing yourself in a way that lets them truly hear you.’
  • 3Economics
    Bring about a general reduction of price levels in (an economy)

    • ‘After Wall Street crashed in 1929, prices in general deflated.’
    • ‘In return for a bail-out of the currency, it would deflate the economy, impose a statutory incomes policy, and maintain a military presence East of Suez.’
    • ‘Mr Geraghty argues that pay cuts will only deflate the economy further at a time when it needs an increase in consumer spending power to give it a further boost.’
    • ‘Well, could inflation soon deflate the economy?’
    • ‘It is clear that the propensity of an economy to deflate is in direct proportion to the degree of protectionism it historically maintained.’
    reduce, slow down, make less active, diminish, lessen, lower
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Origin

Late 19th century: from de- (expressing reversal) + -flate (as in inflate).

Pronunciation

deflate

/dəˈfleɪt//dəˈflāt/