Definition of deerstalker in English:

deerstalker

noun

  • 1A soft cloth cap, originally worn for hunting, with bills in front and behind, and ear flaps that can be tied together over the top.

    • ‘He wins a very useful deerstalker and magnifying glass.’
    • ‘Wearing a deerstalker hat and carrying an oversized magnifying glass she trampled through the crime scene destroying all kinds of forensic evidence.’
    • ‘Since then he has exhibited worldwide - at overseas exhibitions he plays his Englishness to the hilt by turning up wearing plus fours and a deerstalker.’
    • ‘The Doctor's costume of deerstalker and cloak is suitably Holmesian, except that Holmes never wore a deerstalker - that was the invention of one of the original artists…’
    • ‘I'm surprised you're not wearing a deerstalker.’
    • ‘There are fond memories of him in short sleeves and a deerstalker hat driving a topless, sideless jeep in the winter snow.’
    • ‘He's wearing a Sherlock Holmeseque half-caped coat and carrying his deerstalker in his hand.’
    • ‘A deerstalker, Petrowski loved the outdoors and would later pass his knowledge on to young police cadets training in Wellington.’
    • ‘It's absurd to complain that Holmes in cinema doesn't conform to the original, or to grumble that, in the 12 films Rathbone and Bruce made for Universal, he was more likely to be wearing a fedora than a deerstalker.’
    • ‘He wore his deerstalker, and a dirty, dun mackintosh, and a bedraggled tie with stripes.’
    • ‘He ensured that Jeremy Brett donned the deerstalker, and his electrifying performances guaranteed that for millions he became the television Sherlock Holmes.’
    • ‘Here you can still buy a deerstalker hat, be fitted for a pinstripe blazer, slip on some sensible footwear, sniff out some musky cologne or get your balding locks tended by a traditional wet-shave barber.’
    • ‘The biggest surprise was Everett's Holmes: a compelling, brilliant, darkly original character, much closer to the original stories than to deerstalkers and meerschaums and Basil Rathbone.’
    • ‘Despite looking fabulous in a deerstalker and maintaining a healthy interest in opium, I am not Sherlock Holmes.’
    • ‘The actor, famous for his handlebar moustache and deerstalker hat, was born and brought up in Barnsley.’
    • ‘Well, donning my deerstalker and lighting my meerschaum I'd start at the bottom.’
    • ‘Behind me, 20 yards to my right, is Raymond - with his baseball cap tilted back on his head, looking rather less the part than me in my borrowed Barbour deerstalker.’
    • ‘So I donned my deerstalker, polished my largest magnifying glass and set off with large exaggerated strides.’
    • ‘Mrs Mungo rang to ask why we didn't get Jack a deerstalker hat.’
    • ‘He wears plus-fours, lace-up boots, a tie with a picture of a pheasant on it, a game bag slung over his shoulder, a couple of whistles tied around his neck and a battered hat that might once have been described as a deerstalker.’
  • 2A person who stalks deer.

Pronunciation:

deerstalker

/ˈdirˌstôkər/