Definition of declination in English:

declination

noun

  • 1Astronomy
    The angular distance of a point north or south of the celestial equator.

    • ‘Consistently, equinoctial markers and alignments were made to an declination well over half a degree to the north.’
    • ‘It's easy enough to gauge an asteroid's longitude and latitude (ascension and declination in astro-speak), but figuring out its current celestial position is tricky.’
    • ‘To calculate the distance we need to know the declination of the sun on a given day.’
    • ‘He also determined the latitude and longitude of many stars, and measured the greatest declination of the planet Mercury.’
    • ‘Also every month, the Moon will reach its minimum declination at 18 north or south.’
    1. 1.1The angular deviation of a compass needle from true north (because the magnetic north pole and the geographic north pole do not coincide)
      • ‘Gellibrand's most famous scientific discovery was the change over the years in magnetic declination.’
      • ‘On the North Rim the difference between map and compass is 15 east, a distinction known as magnetic declination.’
      • ‘The compass needle and a knowledge of magnetic declination, the angle between the magnetic north and geographic north, were developments from this knowledge; they were described by Shen Kua in 1088.’
      • ‘Proposals were being made to solve the longitude problem and in 1673 one based on magnetic declination was proposed by a certain Henry Bond.’
      • ‘He also studied magnetic declination and was the first to observe the secular variation.’
  • 2US Formal refusal.

    ‘in the face of this declination of the proposition’
    • ‘The actual declination letter disappeared from the file.’
    refusal, withholding, withdrawal
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin declinatio(n-), from the verb declinare (see decline).

Pronunciation:

declination

/ˌdekləˈnāSHən/