Definition of declassify in English:

declassify

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Officially declare (information or documents) to be no longer secret.

    ‘government documents were declassified’
    • ‘Experience shows that commissions require, on average, a year or two to report their results - and even more time to declassify their reports so they can be released for public discussion.’
    • ‘Teller also proposes that the majority of classified UFO documents should be declassified.’
    • ‘To some extent, the U.S. has already embarked on this effort by declassifying thousands of pages of official documents.’
    • ‘The story was only pieced together when German and New Zealand records were declassified in the early 1980s.’
    • ‘Consequently, I have determined that it is in the public interest and the best interest of law enforcement to declassify this information.’
    • ‘Sometimes there are national security documents that won't be declassified for years.’
    • ‘Though they were declassified in 1998, this is the first time that the documents have been made public.’
    • ‘But prior to publication, all documents from the Presidential Archive are declassified, as are documents held in the archives of the former KGB.’
    • ‘Fifty years later, the German government still refuses to declassify its own records on the subject.’
    • ‘The CIA refuses to declassify the documents involved.’
    • ‘Specifically, she noted that Congress does, in fact, have the authority to declassify information.’
    • ‘The American Freedom of Information Act declassified the trial records.’
    • ‘The material was a vital source of intelligence on the Soviet bloc for many years during the Cold War and was only declassified by Nato 10 years ago.’
    • ‘Only the president can declassify information.’
    • ‘It could be a while before the government declassifies information about its ‘secret ‘underground bases there.’
    • ‘The former Soviet KGB archives that have been recently declassified prove their guilt.’
    • ‘Since 1976, the Foreign Ministry has declassified diplomatic documents when they become roughly 30 years old.’
    • ‘The U.S. State Department has just declassified government documents from the mid 1960s.’
    • ‘The law requires the State Department to declassify this material, and yet it is failing to do so.’
    • ‘Some relevant documents have now been declassified, however.’

Pronunciation:

declassify

/dēˈklasəˌfī/