Definition of decide in English:

decide

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Come to a resolution in the mind as a result of consideration.

    [with infinitive] ‘they decided to appoint someone else’
    [with clause] ‘you've decided that a hedge is what you want’
    • ‘Finally the woman ahead of me in mind decides to buy the aspirin and leaves.’
    • ‘Nato will then decide how to proceed with the mission.’
    • ‘I decided it must have been my imagination, and that it was just as well to keep to the task at hand.’
    • ‘Maria pushed those thoughts to the back of her mind, deciding to focus on the here and now, rather than mysterious feelings.’
    • ‘He told the Sunday Herald last week that he finally decided to go ahead without her consent after a phone call from his father.’
    • ‘I assumed the crew had taken the weather into consideration when deciding to fly home, but I didn't know for sure.’
    • ‘However, I wouldn't be surprised if Alex changes his mind again and decides to testify - and I told him as much.’
    • ‘He waited another minute then decided that he had to let someone know what was going on.’
    • ‘He looked at her suspiciously but apparently decided that she was being sincere.’
    • ‘We've compiled a list of the key issues to keep in mind when you're deciding whether a new city is right for you.’
    • ‘I contemplated going back for an umbrella, and decided that there was probably no need.’
    • ‘After six years of strict enforcement of parking laws, the city council has decided motorists deserve a break.’
    • ‘The next morning Alice changes her mind and decides that, after all, she would like Bob to phone her.’
    • ‘The day before getting on the plane to get to my seminar, I finally make up my mind and decide to drop round their flat.’
    • ‘We pushed our plates back, sighed contentedly, and decided that a light dessert of plum yoghurt was all we needed to round it off.’
    • ‘Wu said it took him several days of careful consideration before deciding to accept the appointment.’
    • ‘However, planning inspectors decided the council's complaints were too vague.’
    • ‘Police and doctors have decided Abigail is not yet ready to view a video identity parade.’
    • ‘As Katherine made up her mind, she decided that she would go now, as soon as possible.’
    • ‘She has been an auxiliary nurse for 20 years but decided that she wanted to do something more.’
    1. 1.1[with object]Cause to come to a resolution.
      ‘this business about the letter decided me’
    2. 1.2Make a choice from a number of alternatives.
      ‘she had decided on her plan of action’
      ‘I've decided against having children’
      • ‘We decided on an alternate route that took us to the interstate and we were on our way to Dayton.’
      • ‘In all the cases investigated by police the Crown Prosecution Service decided against pressing charges.’
      • ‘As long as you keep these three main purposes in mind while you are deciding what you want on your website and how it should be worded, you will fill this area nicely.’
      • ‘As usual it was a further five minutes before Mr McDonald decided on his order and Alexa made it back to the kitchen.’
      • ‘We're hoping for a little girl and have decided on a name already!’
      • ‘I had thought of visiting Pakistan but seeing as most of my cousins are now living in Mill Hill, I decided against it.’
      • ‘To its credit, the government agreed, and decided against approving the range.’
      • ‘There is little doubt in my mind that efficiency and cost-effectiveness will inevitably be considerations when deciding on our transport solutions.’
      • ‘She decided on the chocolate covered biscuits and passed around the packet.’
      • ‘After studying what the company had to offer, Louisa finally decided on a mix of pink-and-white balloons.’
      • ‘I saw you all earlier in the evening but decided against calling the police because you were not doing anything really wrong.’
      • ‘The children decided on the content of their films and directed the action.’
      • ‘Countryside Properties has decided against building about 36 houses near Healey Dell.’
      • ‘The couple decided on the venue after spotting it in the Good Hotel Guide and enjoying a romantic break there earlier in the year.’
      • ‘Hitler did take risks, and did stick with unrelenting determination to a course of action once he had decided on it.’
      • ‘I did think about offering her a slice, but soon decided against it.’
      • ‘Thus, the two senior commanders on the spot decided on a land campaign to capture the Gallipoli peninsula.’
      • ‘At the time of writing, the non-Congress Opposition had not decided on its candidate.’
      • ‘But councillors on the environment committee decided against imposing the changes.’
      • ‘I'll be taking your opinions into consideration when deciding on the winner.’
    3. 1.3Give a judgment concerning a matter or legal case.
      ‘the courts decided in favor of the New York claimants’
      [with object] ‘the judge will decide the case’
      • ‘The single judges who now decide most appeals no longer need to issue written opinions.’
      • ‘So far as you are aware, is there any reason why the Federal Court would not have jurisdiction to decide all the matters in issue in this case?’
      • ‘Scotland has its own Assembly which decides on such matters - and English MPs have no vote there.’
      • ‘The trial judge decided in favour of the prosecution for the reasons advanced by Mr Sheridan.’
      • ‘The judge who ultimately decides this case requires the opportunity to hear and observe the persons who will give evidence.’
      • ‘If the jury decides all those matters in the plaintiff's favour, as they did in the Marsden case, then their job is over.’
      • ‘VeriSign stands to lose $100 million if the appeal court decides in favour of Kremen.’
      • ‘The judge ruled to hear more evidence before deciding on the matter.’
      • ‘The sect also initiated exhaustive judicial proceedings, but each time the court decided in favor of Spaink.’
      • ‘Architects will continue to face liability for noncompliant designs, even if the Supreme Court ultimately decides in their favor.’
      • ‘Whether such a statement is admissible as evidence is a matter for the courts to decide.’
      • ‘The court for example had no power to decide in this matter, only a grand jury would have binding status on Mr Cohen.’
      • ‘But whatever the judges or the legislators decide, a court order is no good unless it can be enforced.’
      • ‘It is not clear when the HFEA will decide on the matter.’
      • ‘Now an ecclesiastical court has decided in favour of the changes.’
      • ‘The arguments presented by the HFEA in court, and those made by judges in deciding in favour of the HFEA, contained a number of inconsistencies and arbitrary judgements.’
      • ‘It was not the role of the coroner's court to decide on matters of alleged medical negligence.’
      • ‘Breaking news: this case has just been decided in favor of the students.’
      • ‘The current High Court seems to be deciding most cases in favour of defendants.’
      • ‘Seven years later, the courts decided in favour of the Hotel Sacher.’
    4. 1.4[with object]Come to a decision about (something)
      ‘we must decide the fates of the people who headed the coup’
      • ‘For Murphy, the past has finally caught up and he must now decide his own fate.’
      • ‘The Barbican's new-found success as home to the world's second-biggest snooker tournament must surely be weighed in the balance when the council decides its future.’
      • ‘That's when our parish council must decide its financial plans.’
      • ‘However, the state has not yet enacted the agreement and Nu Image has been awaiting the authorities' decision before deciding its own action on the case.’
      • ‘In the end, how you play the game and the decisions you make will decide his fate and the fate of the town.’
      • ‘Arguments for and against a controversial new theme park ride have been aired before a Government inspector who must decide its fate.’
      • ‘This placement reflects the impartiality of the jurors who must decide guilt or innocence.’
      • ‘The future of Southampton's bin service was yesterday decided at a full council meeting.’
      • ‘Tonight Swindon Council will end months of speculation when it decides the level of council tax for the next financial year.’
      • ‘Rob M. looked like he was in charge, making the decisions, and deciding his own fate.’
      • ‘Before the details of the new bond issue are decided, several important questions have to be answered.’
      • ‘Each government must decide its various priorities, and these may vary from year to year, decade to decade.’
      • ‘However, the council will not decide its budget until February 21 and the plans could be opposed by other party political groups.’
      • ‘The outcome was decided by a family vote.’
      • ‘These extra expenses and the resulting lower net income must be measured before deciding our tuition rates.’
      • ‘The bowler must be allowed to bowl until the committee decides his fate.’
      • ‘Until January 2001, 70 % of complete applications were decided within one week of receipt.’
      • ‘Labour council leader Cllr Bob Howarth told a meeting of the executive that the council's other political parties would have a say in deciding council tax increases.’
      • ‘The case soon went to court and my future was decided by a jury.’
      • ‘A panel of judges will decide the Variety Club awards, which will go to the region's top personalities in sport and media.’
    5. 1.5[with object]Resolve or settle (a question or contest)
      ‘an exciting game was decided in a sudden-death overtime’
      • ‘It was fitting that this pacey, engaging, if not top standard, game should be decided by a goal of beauty.’
      • ‘Having the election decided by the courts rather than voters is deeply unsatisfactory.’
      • ‘David says the national question will be decided at a three-day congress in late October.’
      • ‘Too much effort has gone into each team's preparations to allow a game be decided on a poor decision by a referee.’
      • ‘All those questions will be decided by medical assessors and will not be open to litigation.’
      • ‘The choices of what limits should be imposed are decided by electoral contest.’
      • ‘The Minor Premiership will now be decided in the final game of the season between the clubs next weekend.’
      • ‘The game should be decided by either good batting or good bowling… rather than being won by default.’
      • ‘It also doesn't alter the nature of the tie or the criteria by which that game will be decided, until now.’
      • ‘Now, it appears possible that that game could decide the conference championship.’
      • ‘By the time this letter is read the last Test will have probably been decided.’
      • ‘The match was decided on the last game of the evening when Hansen was able to overcome Armstrong.’
      • ‘Claremorris now face Westport B in a game that will decide the championship in Westport Saturday week.’
      • ‘Should Topalov win the final game, the match will be decided by a playoff later in the day.’
      • ‘The college bowl season centres on New Year's Day, though the game that decides the national collegiate champions is no longer played on that day.’
      • ‘The US election is not decided by the popular vote, but by a state electoral college system.’
      • ‘Eligibility to free health care is quite properly a political question, to be decided by due democratic process.’
      • ‘The election was decided ultimately by the large postal vote of emigrants from the province.’
      • ‘For the first time, an NFL championship game would be decided in sudden-death overtime.’
      • ‘It's going to be like a high school basketball game that is decided by the final shot at the buzzer.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense bring to a settlement): from French décider, from Latin decidere determine from de- off + caedere cut.

Pronunciation:

decide

/dəˈsīd/