Definition of debate in English:

debate

noun

  • 1A formal discussion on a particular topic in a public meeting or legislative assembly, in which opposing arguments are put forward.

    • ‘We can constantly intervene in discussions and debates and ask why questions are framed in the way they are.’
    • ‘The Deputy First Minister has tabled two amendments for the final debate on Wednesday.’
    • ‘In those circumstances the House does not need to hold an urgent debate on the matter today.’
    • ‘In yesterday's debate, Mr Wicks acknowledged the " complexity " of the problems facing former mining areas.’
    • ‘A debate in parliament was interrupted for an announcement of Germany's victory.’
    • ‘She is always on the move, always between important committee meetings and debates in the Lords and media interviews and court appearances.’
    • ‘Not one public meeting or debate has been organised by the council.’
    • ‘The records on televised presidential debates are unequivocal.’
    • ‘In the first couple of activists' meetings there were debates about selling Socialist Worker and holding Marxist forums.’
    • ‘I am looking forward to the National Party's contribution to tonight's debate.’
    • ‘They also called for a debate on the subject to be held in the European Parliament.’
    • ‘Watt committed himself to holding more public debates and discussions separate from council meetings.’
    • ‘In the key parliamentary debate on Tuesday he voted in support of the war.’
    • ‘Many of the big meetings allowed little time for discussion, so most debates took place informally or at smaller meetings and seminars.’
    • ‘Pendle councillors held a debate on phone masts and called for more power to decide where they went.’
    • ‘Switzerland, with its generally slower pace and its thorough political debates before votes are held, may be the exception.’
    • ‘The second question is, why were all the meetings and debates on the budget closed to the public?’
    • ‘Both bids had previously been turned down by members of the District Council following debates at planning meetings.’
    • ‘Local party and trade union delegates also voted for debates on the issues of public services, pensions, employment rights and manufacturing.’
    • ‘More than any other events on the campaign trail this year, the debates have drawn intense public interest.’
    discussion, exchange of views, discourse, parley
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    1. 1.1 An argument about a particular subject, especially one in which many people are involved.
      ‘the national debate on abortion’
      ‘there has been much debate about prices’
      • ‘One of the most vigorous philosophical debates of the century broke out among cosmologists during the 1930s and 1940s.’
      • ‘This aspect of the debate has been the subject of much political and academic disagreement.’
      • ‘Adverts on television and in newspapers were designed to begin the public debate about the assembly.’
      • ‘The subject that dominates the debate about the new car is of course the styling.’
      • ‘The research will also reignite the debate over the use of cannabis for other medicinal purposes.’
      • ‘And while we're on the subject of national debates, the perennial one about the future of the BBC rumbles on.’
      • ‘The book, published in 1999, sparked considerable public debate.’
      • ‘News filtered through as MPs debated the bill that will pay for the Olympic Games.’
      • ‘In France, the nature, meaning and acceptability of his work remain the subject of debate.’
      • ‘The debate on this subject will go on as long as the human race exists, so all I can do is raise a few points on the subject.’
      • ‘While the cause of the erratic weather is a subject of debate, a couple of its effects are clear.’
      • ‘Certain parts of the country are beginning to explore the uses of the site and get involved in serious debates.’
      • ‘Whether civil servants should wear a uniform is still a matter of public debate.’
      • ‘An ongoing debate is raging in Germany about the pros and cons of daycare for children.’
      • ‘Motherhood - taken for granted for centuries - is now the subject of heated debates.’
      • ‘Love him or hate him, he is the subject of heated debates among fans.’
      • ‘Now the great debate on smoking in public spaces is coming to Manchester.’
      • ‘I wouldn't normally involve myself in debates or arguments about who should be American president.’
      • ‘A vigorous debate is raging over the economic growth estimates.’
      • ‘It is a subject that warrants wider debate and much more prompt action.’
      • ‘Some of the by-laws generated heated public debate when they were published in their draft form.’
      argument, quarrel, wrangle, squabble, altercation, dispute, disputation, war of words, contretemps, misunderstanding
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Argue about (a subject), especially in a formal manner.

    ‘the board debated his proposal’
    ‘the date when people first entered America is hotly debated’
    • ‘The trust's financial recovery plan was also debated at the meeting.’
    • ‘Five protesters managed to evade security to enter the chamber as MPs debated the controversial issue.’
    • ‘He may let parliament debate the matter, if it suits him.’
    • ‘I would have thought the fact that Parliament is debating this legislation shows parliamentary power.’
    • ‘The Law Society of Scotland is set to debate the issue of child offenders and child rights at a conference in May.’
    • ‘But when it came to the price of salt, the commissioners spent many hours debating the subject.’
    • ‘Further rioting followed and the subject was debated in the Reichstag.’
    • ‘The item had not been included on the agenda, which meant the committee could not debate the issue.’
    • ‘Reports on highly specialist issues are debated, but with little detail.’
    • ‘The Bill, brought under the ten-minute rule, is due to be debated by MPs on Tuesday.’
    • ‘Last Tuesday the issue was debated by the Scottish parliament's European committee.’
    • ‘The issue of the bridge came up again, for the second month in a row, and again the topic was hotly debated.’
    • ‘In essence, that is why we are here today debating this bill.’
    • ‘The role of physiotherapy in prevention and management of pulmonary disease has been debated for decades.’
    • ‘He hoped MPs would be able to debate the issue and persuade the government to change its stance.’
    • ‘Last night the House of Lords debated a proposal to extend research on human embryos.’
    • ‘Reproductive cloning will be debated at the Royal Society of Edinburgh on November 5.’
    • ‘For decades, experts have debated the relative merits of nonprofit vs. for-profit hospitals.’
    • ‘There are working groups and study groups still debating the issues.’
    • ‘Congress is now debating agricultural policy for the new millennium.’
    discuss, confer about, talk over, talk through, talk about, exchange views on, exchange views about, thrash out, argue, argue about, argue the pros and cons of, dispute, wrangle over, bandy words concerning, contend over, contest, controvert, moot
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    1. 1.1with clause Consider a possible course of action in one's mind before reaching a decision.
      ‘he debated whether he should leave the matter alone or speak to her’
      • ‘Sandra paused for a moment and debated in her mind as to whether she should go or not.’
      • ‘After all, once you are debating whether a work is art or not, you have already proven it is.’
      • ‘He waits by the phone, debating whether to make a trip to India to search for his son.’
      • ‘She took a sip of her iced tea, silently debating about whether to tell him or not.’
      • ‘Brittany bit her lip for a moment as she debated which to choose.’
      • ‘She sat cross-legged with a confused look on her face, debating whether to ask or keep quiet until a better time.’
      • ‘Terry, a big man in a rather loud suit, is openly debating whether to sign up now.’
      • ‘The person who bumped into her froze and was obviously debating whether or not to make a run for it.’
      • ‘I told him it was too late when I saw he was debating whether or not to tell me more.’
      • ‘I was debating whether or not to approach her and ask her if anything was wrong.’
      • ‘Christine looked at Jacquin, she was debating in her mind if she should talk to him or not.’
      • ‘The sisters themselves were equally nervous, debating whether or not to go for just a half container.’
      • ‘After standing near the door debating whether or not to enter I decide just to go in.’
      • ‘Her mind was still debating which way to go when her body went ahead and chose for her.’
      • ‘After school, Kendra was debating with herself whether or not to go to practice.’
      • ‘I can see she is debating whether or not to tell me the truth.’
      • ‘I stared at the plate for a while debating whether to try it.’
      • ‘Dennis put his bag down on the ground and stared at it, at if he was debating whether to open it.’
      • ‘Still debating whether to call B. It would be such a step back if I do.’
      • ‘Audrey debated the issue for a minute, then bent down and gave Todd a peck on the cheek.’
      consider, give some thought to, think over, think about, chew over, mull over, turn over in one's mind, weigh up, ponder, deliberate, reflect, contemplate, muse, meditate, cogitate
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • be open to debate

    • Be unproven; require further discussion.

      • ‘Whether women are less ambitious than men is open to debate.’
      • ‘Whether Arsenal would have had the energy to withstand an 11-man challenge is open to debate.’
      • ‘How one goes about implementing that ideology is open to debate.’
      • ‘The penalty decision which followed is open to debate for the initial challenge took place outside the box, with the momentum of both players carrying them into the area.’
      • ‘How well specific juries expressed the people's will was open to debate.’
      • ‘The significance of this fact is open to debate.’
      • ‘Furthermore, the true value of those benefits is open to debate.’
      • ‘While overall no one would argue that a reduction in more serious accidents is anything less than encouraging, the part played by speed cameras in this is open to debate.’
      • ‘Whether this is because O-levels are harder or they needed longer to prepare is open to debate.’
      • ‘Just how much Yorkshire will benefit from his return is open to debate as the player is contracted to England.’
  • under debate

    • Being discussed or disputed.

      • ‘The Commission is yet to come up with a final report, since the current document under debate is a draft document.’
      • ‘Can I ask the Leader of the Opposition to stick to the matter under debate?’
      • ‘One of the key policy discussions currently under debate is research on embryonic stem-cells.’
      • ‘Plans to radically shake up local government and to divide the country into elected regional assemblies are currently under debate.’
      • ‘There's a controversial proposal under debate in New York City now that would give non-citizens a protected privilege of American citizenship, the right to vote.’
      • ‘Fisher's theory is just one of several hypotheses under debate today.’
      • ‘The exact details of these studies are under debate, but there is a consensus that the Earth formed about 4.6 billion years ago and that life began within the first billion years.’
      • ‘But just what constitutes success is still under debate.’
      • ‘The working time directive which was under debate last week prevents employers from employing workers to work more than 48 hours per week.’
      • ‘The new act, which is currently under debate, gives landlords the opportunity to catch up on rent increases not administered in the past three years without having to go through arbitration.’

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin dis- (expressing reversal) + battere ‘to fight’.

Pronunciation

debate

/dəˈbāt//dəˈbeɪt/