Main definitions of debark in English

: debark1debark2

debark1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Leave a ship or aircraft.

    • ‘After debarking in Turkey, they traveled to Yugoslavia and Bulgaria, and some further dispersed into Czechoslovakia and France.’
    • ‘As Caiidide was reviewing the troops, the old woman arrived to warn him that a Spanish ship had entered the harbor; officials had debarked to arrest the murderer of the Grand Inquisitor.’
    • ‘The guerrillas had stirred my gravest anxiety, but little did I know about the hundred additional worrisome things until I debarked down here.’
    • ‘His advisor signed off and within twenty-four hours, he was debarking in Orlando and renting a car to take him to the Home.’
    • ‘We did receive a report from a citizen who reports seeing two men matching their description debarking from a medium-sized yacht at a dock on Waikiki beach, Hawaii.’
    • ‘When she debarked from the train she was met by one of their stable hands who then picked up her luggage and led her to the carriage.’
    • ‘Several times on the bus, the driver has said to the passengers ‘make room because the wheelchair is debarking.’’
    • ‘They will be debarking following the final tests.’
    • ‘Your ticket entitles you to debark as many times as you like and reboard at no extra charge.’
    • ‘Customs is in place to check goods and manifests, but there is not yet any provision for immigration, so no one is allowed to debark and enter Iraq from shipboard.’
    • ‘Just ask the burghers of a certain age who are debarking from their vast, shiny cars at the door to the new O'Rourke's Steakhouse on Montrose Boulevard.’
    • ‘When we debarked from our cruise ship for a day of fun, we were surrounded by vendors of local wares along with transportation and tour services.’
    • ‘We have taken more than 10 cruises, and this was the most efficient embarking and debarking that we have ever experienced.’
    • ‘While the majority of cruise ships coming to this area call on Cozumel (where 1.8 million passengers debarked in 2001), several ships call weekly at Playa del Carmen.’
    • ‘This means passengers can custom-design their cruises by deciding when and where they want to embark and debark (more than 200 ports are approved by the line for this program).’
    • ‘Bill filmed the tugboat landing at the edge of the dock and the people debarking.’
    • ‘I was a prisoner because I debarked at Mili Atoll.’
    • ‘And they're no help at all to us exit freaks, who like to know just the right place to stand when boarding a train, so that you debark opposite the way out.’
    • ‘On one April day in 1847, more than 1000 debarked.’
    • ‘You'll have a wide selection of pre or post-cruise land tour options, depending on where you embark or debark.’
    get off, step off, leave
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object]Unload (cargo or troops) from a ship or aircraft.
      • ‘He'll debark us where we want and set home immediately.’
      • ‘Around South America is gaining in popularity, and a couple of megaships are sailing to Antarctica once or twice, but not debarking passengers there.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French débarquer.

Pronunciation:

debark

/dēˈbärk/

Main definitions of debark in English

: debark1debark2

debark2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Remove (the bark) from a tree.

    • ‘Options include colour marking, stump treatment and a debarking system for eucalyptus.’
    • ‘Initially, wood packaging material should be made from debarked wood as well.’
    • ‘With the extensive debarking we are doing at the mill, we are able to use a lot of the root-burned wood on the green line.’
    • ‘After March 1 2006, The letters ‘DB’ must be added to the abbreviation of the approved measure included in the mark in order to indicate that the wood has been debarked.’
    • ‘For example, California requires that people in the 10 infested counties get permits before transporting any SOD host species within the state, with the exception of firewood that has been totally debarked.’
    • ‘A Whole Tree Processor will be delimbing, debarking and chipping whole trees, producing pulp chips.’
    • ‘In general, these spruce appeared clawed, debarked, broken, ripped out of the ground, buried under large piles of peat, or tilted at ground level, damage that likely occurred during excavation at the dens by polar bears.’
    • ‘When they haul the logs into the sawmill the first thing they do is debark them.’
    • ‘The two Steves negotiated to get the burl to Ashland, and then Steve Sharps and his sons moved it to the current site, debarked it, and protected it with tung oil.’
    • ‘The world's largest redwood lumber mill offers free self-guided tours, where you can watch trees being debarked, head-rigged, trimmed, graded, and end-glued.’
    • ‘Trees were placed in a large revolving drum and debarked by friction.’
    • ‘Wounding of trees by debarking during the vegetative period sometimes results in the formation of callus tissue which develops over the entire wound surface or on parts of it.’
    • ‘Feric also has a report on using the Deal Processor for debarking wood.’
    • ‘The elephants had killed the trees by uprooting and debarking them.’
    • ‘As shown in Table 5, marked depressions in secondary growth of major roots of cut (C N) plants relative to uncut plants were also recorded for roots that had been partly debarked and left to grow for 21 months.’
    • ‘When the trees are first debarked the mulch is fairly fresh, and needs to decompose before we dare use it around our plants.’
    • ‘The two currents create a rotating column of air that can generate 318-mile-per-hour winds, debark trees, and fire cars across the sky like missiles.’

Pronunciation:

debark

/dēˈbärk/