Definition of debar in English:

debar

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually be debarred
  • Exclude or prohibit (someone) officially from doing something.

    ‘people declaring that they were HIV-positive could be debarred entry’
    • ‘Since, as a woman, she was debarred from attending the university, he instructed her by letter.’
    • ‘If my late father had wanted to go rock climbing or bet his pension on the stock market, I see no reason why a bus pass should have debarred him from doing so.’
    • ‘Students involved in such activities should be served a notice of misconduct before being debarred from institutions.’
    • ‘It was also stipulated that the Corporation should be debarred from selling the estate or any part of it, and that it should be used for enjoyment and recreation by everyone.’
    • ‘The bill seeks to debar candidates charged with ‘heinous ‘crimes from fighting elections.’
    • ‘Many Americans believe Article 2 of the constitution, debarring foreign-born citizens from standing as president, to be outdated.’
    • ‘The government should debar criminals and corrupt politicians from entering Parliament and state Assemblies, which are the sacred platforms of Indian democracy.’
    • ‘Many will argue that his disrespectful behaviour towards police officers should automatically debar him from the judicial system.’
    • ‘I was debarred up to June 1999 from speaking out under the Official Secrets Act.’
    • ‘Any conviction that does not involve dishonesty is fine; it does not debar a person from being an officer of a charitable entity.’
    • ‘Such behaviour in youth did not debar young men from entering the professions.’
    • ‘When an allegation is made, the member is debarred, or effectively suspended, as they are not allowed to take part in any GAA activity.’
    • ‘If a majority of Euro-MPs were to decide that a party was not abiding by their definition of human rights and democratic values, it would be debarred.’
    • ‘They say that's a financial interest that debars us from having an exemption.’
    • ‘The court can then debar the convicted person from entering politics.’
    • ‘The EC should debar him from contesting elections for violating the model code of conduct.’
    • ‘The decision means that the teenagers of Greenock have been debarred from seeing a film that reflects their own lives.’
    • ‘The young hero has been debarred from taking the exams.’
    • ‘Why should going to Eton and Oxford be seen to debar a person from being elected as a Prime Minister?’
    • ‘All of his children by this wife were debarred from the Crown, as indeed was Henry VII's mother Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond.’
    exclude, ban, bar, disqualify, disentitle, declare ineligible, preclude, rule out, shut out, lock out, keep out, reject, blackball
    prevent, prohibit, proscribe, disallow, ban, interdict, block, stop, curb, restrict, restrain, obstruct, hinder
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from French débarrer, from Old French desbarrer unbar from des- (expressing reversal) + barrer to bar.

Pronunciation:

debar

/dēˈbär/