Definition of deal-breaker in English:



  • (in business and politics) a factor or issue that, if unresolved during negotiations, would cause one party to withdraw from a deal.

    • ‘For a kid-oriented film, though, consistency problems aren't a real deal-breaker.’
    • ‘I thought having a girlfriend go away for a while was a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘That's going to be a deal-breaker for some no matter how awesomely deformed yet melodic the licks are.’
    • ‘Lying, however, IS a big deal and a possible deal-breaker.’
    • ‘Having a decent advisor going in is crucial, and should be a deal-breaker even if everything else about the program seems ideal.’
    • ‘Others argue that I am limiting myself by making religious practice a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘Certainly, the charge is never large enough to be a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘We have not heard from either candidate about what would be really the deal-breaker.’
    • ‘You were plucky enough to call him on that deal-breaker.’
    • ‘Two's company, three's a crowd, and the needy ex-wife is a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘His inability to speak English was a perpetual deal-breaker.’
    • ‘For some antiwar progressives, no doubt, it will be a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘I think it depends enormously on why you consider this particular thing a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘The real deal-breaker is that a stand-alone player is the only kind available.’
    • ‘The real deal-breaker with this housekeeper is whether or not she's scared of dogs.’
    • ‘Fortunately for Kevin, no matter how unimpressed Coraline was with the move to Newcastle, it wasn't a deal-breaker.’
    • ‘The deal-breaker was, allegedly, that the radio station was not prepared to mention the sponsors often enough.’
    • ‘We all have some idea of what a deal-breaker in a relationship is.’
    • ‘Either way, it's got to be good news that being lousy at parking is once more endearing rather than a relationship deal-breaker.’
    • ‘Yesterday, the prevailing opinion in political circles was that his intervention wasn't a deal-breaker.’