Definition of dead air in English:

dead air

noun

  • An unintended interruption of the video or audio signal during a television or radio broadcast.

    • ‘D' Onofrio and Zellweger deliver their dialogue in a manner that is too choppy, too halting, with just a beat too much dead air between each line.’
    • ‘The signal cut off, leaving only dead air as Murphy continued to call out to Carly.’
    • ‘You can tell when a commercial break was mandated, as the screen fades to black (even as action continues) and pulls up from dead air to reintroduce the drama, post advertisement slot.’
    • ‘Move the slider on your media player forward to avoid the 7 or so minutes of dead air.’
    • ‘Extras include an audio commentary from director Jonathan Nossiter, which starts out fine, but Nossiter quickly runs out of things to say, leaving a lot of dead air in the last half of the track.’
    • ‘Despite their legendarily long sets, there's usually never more than a few seconds of dead air between songs, time enough for Dallas to thank the appreciative audience.’
    • ‘Radio producers consider dead air time even more of a sin than their television counterparts do.’
    • ‘But as I filed away the vinyl and put the covers on the decks, I noted one slight hitch to proceedings: I hadn't lifted the microphone volume and had entertained the troops with an hour of dead air.’
    • ‘McDermott and Margulies leave a lot of dead air in their commentaries, but the featurettes are enlightening.’
    • ‘But Kylie was already gone, leaving only dead air at the end of the line.’
    • ‘We had to build it that way because in the broadcast world, dead air is a sin.’
    • ‘As a result, even though everything's been primed and prepared and her only task is to read off of the teleprompter, she realized we had about 45 seconds of dead air.’
    • ‘A lot of dead air, in between three liberal radio hosts congratulating each other on how clever they are.’
    • ‘I wonder just how much of the constant stream of inane chat that drives me nuts on TV, or on the radio, is down to the need to avoid dead air?’
    • ‘The first by director Robert Altman, production designer Stephen Altman, and producer David Levy is interesting but contains a great deal of dead air.’
    • ‘This is important so that we can ward off problems that might cause the box to crash - no broadcaster likes dead air.’
    • ‘To avoid panicking its audience by having any dead air at all, between songs in individual sets it'll cut away to interviews with other bands.’
    • ‘These programs can be unpolished and quirky, with plenty of dead air and ‘ums,’ but that's their charm.’
    • ‘Behind the scenes, the show's producer hisses, ‘this is dead air!’’
    • ‘Since we get about ten of these throughout the film, that means there are almost 50 seconds of blank, dead air on the disc.’