Definition of daybook in English:

daybook

noun

  • 1An account book in which a day's transactions are entered for later transfer to a ledger.

    • ‘During the 19th century account numbers began to replace slashes to indicate posting of daybook entries.’
    • ‘Daniel Burnap's daybooks and ledgers record the sale of forty-nine clocks over a twenty-year period.’
    • ‘The daybook kept by Joshua Shipman, a cabinetmaker, records a brisk business between 1796 and 1803.’
    • ‘The front page of one of the daybooks includes a heading for a ‘butter account’.’
    • ‘Swan appears as a customer in Revere's daybooks every year between 1782 and 1787.’
    • ‘One of the many entries in the daybook carefully records the number of gallons of whiskey and cider used to pay Dabney Carr, the nephew of Thomas Jefferson.’
    • ‘The shopkeeper's role as a banker is also evident from several entries recorded in the daybook during 1796.’
    • ‘When he turned twenty-one, he began to keep a daybook in which he listed everything he owed and everything owed him.’
    • ‘Entries in the daybook show date of purchase, name of purchaser, items bought and cost.’
    • ‘Further contact with his descendants yielded daybooks from about 1881, when he started up business as an independent craftsman.’
    • ‘A vet is required to keep all records of testing in daybooks filled in at the time of the test’
    • ‘The daybook entries of Potter and Allen in Oakham, Massachusetts, for example, include entries for moccasins, mats, and baskets in the 1830s.’
    notepad, notebook, pad, memo pad, exercise book, binder
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American A diary.
      • ‘‘All the writing in the daybook is a form of talking to myself, a way of thinking on paper,’ says Murray.’
      • ‘I still carried home a daybook full of things I want to remember, put into practice, take to heart, and share with others.’
      • ‘Consequently, I then began to read the therapist notes, the daybooks, and the expert reports by a variety of mental health professionals.’
      • ‘The history of upper-class folk in the Old South is documented through journals, diaries, daybooks, and material possessions.’
      • ‘Robert has checked his daybook - his survey was at end Sept. 93.’
      • ‘If this reader wants to be like Ink, she can begin by writing some short opinion pieces in a daybook.’
      • ‘A daybook, or journal, can be a seedbed for ideas.’
      • ‘I returned home with a daybook bulging with inspiration.’
      • ‘I enjoyed it so much that it inspired me to dig out my daybook from a seminar five years ago.’
      • ‘It's all routine, all noted in my daybook, and much if not all of it has happened before.’
      • ‘In a daybook or journal, begin to keep a record of interesting character names and place names related to your community.’

Pronunciation:

daybook

/ˈdābo͝ok/