Definition of danger in English:

danger

noun

  • 1The possibility of suffering harm or injury.

    ‘his life was in danger’
    • ‘Tips are given on how pupils can make sure they are safe in everyday situations, and what they should do if they think they are in danger.’
    • ‘Firefighters left picket lines during strikes last November to help fight fires in which lives were in danger.’
    • ‘Now that the weather is encouraging gardeners to get out and start cutting and digging, hedgehogs are in danger.’
    • ‘Even firemen during their recent industrial action answered the call where life was in danger.’
    • ‘Decent people should be able to conduct their business and go about their work without being in danger.’
    • ‘Thieves are putting drivers' lives in danger by stealing roadside safety signs in a north west beauty spot.’
    • ‘I had to warn my real family of the possible danger that they could be in so that they would be safe.’
    • ‘How would you feel if your whole family was in danger?’
    • ‘He said up to 30 jobs in total are in danger and it is critical that these workers are maintained.’
    • ‘Their training had placed not only them in danger, but also their workmates and the community.’
    • ‘It wasn't the thrill of danger that appealed to her, because she didn't actually realise there would be any.’
    • ‘Anyone seeing other birds in danger on the river can contact the charity.’
    • ‘Realising the toddler was in danger Valerie, who cannot swim, went into the pool and pulled her out of the water.’
    • ‘It provides that the person concerned should not be returned to a country or area where they would be in danger.’
    • ‘We continually stressed that we were leaving so we would be safe and that we were not in danger.’
    • ‘But thankfully no-one was hurt, none of the other properties were in danger, and all is well.’
    • ‘They argued that the development put the health and safety of employees and road users in the area in danger.’
    • ‘If freedom of choice is in danger for some ethnic groups, it is in danger for all.’
    • ‘Thames Coastguard at Walton said swimmers had been getting out of their depth and putting their lives in danger.’
    • ‘Scientists feel that the species is in danger if the entire population is located at one place.’
    peril, hazard, risk, jeopardy, endangerment, imperilment, insecurity
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person or thing that is likely to cause harm or injury.
      ‘infertile soils where drought is a danger’
      • ‘They were given suitable advice about the dangers of driving on Salisbury plain.’
      • ‘His parents had divorced and there was no one to keep an eye on him and warn him of the dangers of drugs.’
      • ‘He warned children of the dangers of smoking, poor diet and a lack of exercise.’
      • ‘The horrible reality of warfare and the inherent dangers it poses have been very much to the fore.’
      • ‘More pubs are becoming smoke free as more people understand the dangers of smoking.’
      • ‘We should be wary of dangers to our liberty and privacy with the excuse of security.’
      • ‘One of the dangers in our western society is that we replace people with materialism.’
      • ‘Becuase of the dangers involved, we thought it best to ask for volunteers to try out the great ski jump.’
      • ‘Then they will discover the dangers of knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing.’
      • ‘Youths have been warned by firefighters about the dangers of starting rubbish fires.’
      • ‘They recommended all hospital set up specific teams to deal with the dangers of blood clots.’
      • ‘His employers never warned him about the dangers nor did they provide him with a suitable mask.’
      • ‘I want to do something that will alert other children to the dangers of household products.’
      • ‘Firefighters are warning homeowners about the dangers of leaving their gas oven on.’
      • ‘It was a good way to get the message out to people worldwide about the dangers of smoking.’
      • ‘Exaggerating the wrong dangers can mean missing the ones that are really important.’
      • ‘The accident once again highlights the dangers of swimming in unsuitable waters.’
      • ‘The dangers of harm to civilians are much greater in the case of action against a state.’
      • ‘He said he was sure he was aware of the inherent dangers in motorcycle racing.’
      • ‘The government have the proof of the dangers of smoking, yet this is a legal drug.’
      menace, hazard, threat, risk, peril
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 The possibility of something unwelcome or unpleasant.
      ‘there was no danger of the champagne running out’
      • ‘With pipes frozen, there was danger that the back boiler on his fire would explode.’
      • ‘If the proposed plans go ahead there is a very real danger that the closure of this business will lead to the loss of this unique service.’
      • ‘There is the danger that the precautionary principle causes its own harm.’
      • ‘Even so, there's always the danger that new providers might not be able to live up to their own hype.’
      • ‘There is a very real danger that, with an election in the offing, he may be swayed by those who shout the loudest.’
      • ‘As long as there continues to be a danger that such things will happen again, the risk remains.’
      • ‘There is the danger that the political process of democratization will grind to a halt.’
      • ‘There is also the danger that young players can subconsciously go out there just hoping not to lose rather than thinking we can win.’
      • ‘There is always the danger that exposing the humanity of these monsters makes them sympathetic.’
      • ‘There was this great danger that I was going to lose all my copyright.’
      • ‘Since Cristal is so fashionable at the moment there is the danger that it will stop being trendy.’
      • ‘But there is a very real danger that some people could look at this programme and draw the wrong conclusions.’
      • ‘There is a very great and real danger that this century will be mankind's last.’
      • ‘There is the danger that the hub nuts will come off and then the wheels drop off.’
      • ‘Now there is the danger that when the people enjoy the plenty of the land they will forget God.’
      • ‘There is also the danger that the scheduled transfer of power by the end of June will fail to materialize.’
      • ‘There is the danger that Tate Britain could look very provincial in its concerns and its displays.’
      • ‘So there is the danger that half the value of the clothing could end up elsewhere, perhaps under a residuary bequest.’
      • ‘Ironically, its biggest threat is the very real danger that it could become the victim of its own success.’
      • ‘But there is a very realistic danger that a cash crisis could trip them up on the way to the altar.’
      possibility, chance, risk, probability, likelihood, fear, prospect
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3British The status of a railroad signal indicating that the line is not clear and that a train should not proceed.
      • ‘The ballot is in protest at several drivers who have been relegated to platform work after passing signals at danger.’
      • ‘AWS can be overridden by the driver and does, not, therefore stop a driver passing a signal at danger.’
      • ‘PASSENGERS ' lives are daily being put at risk by a failure to crack down on trains which pass signals at danger.’
      • ‘Both involved a train passing a signal at danger and resulted in coaches being destroyed by fire.’
      • ‘Reverting to the older kind of level crossing where the signals would be set to danger until the road is halted and safely closed off.’
      • ‘It had been passed at danger eight times before the Paddington disaster.’

Phrases

  • out of danger

    • (of a person who has suffered a serious injury or illness) not expected to die.

      • ‘The English supporter who received stab wounds - thought to have followed clashes with local Turkish youths - is now said to be out of danger.’
      • ‘We are glad to get this good news, but she is far from being out of danger, and this will affect the rest of her life.’
      • ‘However a hospital staffer last night said that he was ‘all right’, was communicating and was out of danger.’
      • ‘A man in the same car is now thought to be out of danger.’
      • ‘He was admitted to the hospital, and was stated to be out of danger.’
      • ‘The two were hospitalised and stated to be out of danger.’
      • ‘The report also noted that Gupta is in stable condition recovering at Bombay Hospital. and is out of danger.’
      • ‘Doctors battled for three hours to save her and it was five days before she was out of danger.’
      • ‘It was a day before doctors said Melessa was out of danger and she could see Lauren.’
      • ‘Initially in a critical condition, Katie is out of danger but still poorly and her father said it was hard to watch her suffer.’
      • ‘Melinda's fever decreased slightly, but enough that the doctor believed that she was out of danger for the time being.’
      • ‘The 11 injured people who are residents and pedestrians were said to be out of danger after treatment.’
      • ‘He is keeping a bedside vigil with his partner who is said to be out of danger but very uncomfortable.’
      • ‘Doctors said the man, who was bleeding heavily when brought in by an ambulance, was now out of danger.’
      • ‘Maghrabi quoted doctors on Friday as saying the Frenchman, who had been in a critical condition, was out of danger.’
      • ‘She drove to the hospital and found her daughter barely conscious but out of danger.’
      • ‘Now doctors say she is out of danger and could be in a children's ward by the end of the week.’
      • ‘She was rushed to the General Hospital, Sector 6, and is now stated to be out of danger.’
      • ‘The injured were immediately rushed to the trauma centre at Karnal where 10 persons are said to be out of danger.’
      • ‘He was admitted to a near by hospital and is stated to be out of danger.’
  • in danger of

    • Likely to incur or to suffer from.

      ‘the animal is in danger of extinction’
      • ‘She believes the art of cake decorating is in danger of dying out - but she is determined to revive it.’
      • ‘We could be in danger of not addressing the skills shortages we need to address.’
      • ‘Last year the magazine said the Irish market was in danger of a sharp fall, and it hasn't changed its tune.’
      • ‘Now they are in danger of making a pig's ear of government policy on health.’
      • ‘Last week, no one was seriously hurt, and the police rarely seemed in danger of losing control.’
      • ‘Police saved the day when a bride was in danger of not getting to the church in time.’
      • ‘I laughed so much I was in danger of rupturing a spleen or other anonymous organ.’
      • ‘As a result they're in danger of being buried under piles of useless and sometimes toxic rubbish.’
      • ‘This crisis of trust in America is in danger of leading directly to a crisis of American capitalism.’
      • ‘There were even reports that the whole movie was in danger of being scrapped.’
      • ‘It is a special place in a wonderful setting and is in danger of just becoming a town park rather than a country park.’
      • ‘If we do not do that, I think we are in danger of dispiriting people and not giving credit where credit is due.’
      • ‘We are in danger of simply looking at the issues of the hospitals in isolation.’
      • ‘The prophets of doom were telling us that the world was in danger of global cooling not so long ago!’
      • ‘If they don't begin to pick up points soon, Oban are in danger of being relegated from the top division.’
      • ‘The tower was in danger of falling down, so the National Trust have a four year plan of restoration going on.’
      • ‘He has broken a bone in his foot, and is now in danger of not being fit for the World Cup.’
      • ‘Recently my father advised officials that a stone wall supporting a road was in danger of collapse.’
      • ‘Our labour market, meanwhile, is in danger of becoming the envy of the world in at least one respect.’
      • ‘After so many years on the road, this team is now in danger of breaking up.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘jurisdiction or power’, specifically ‘power to harm’): from Old French dangier, based on Latin dominus ‘lord’.

Pronunciation

danger

/ˈdānjər//ˈdeɪndʒər/