Main definitions of dander in US English:

: dander1dander2dander3

dander1

noun

in phrase get/have one's dander up
informal
  • Lose one's temper.

    ‘this doesn't half get my dander up’
    • ‘They put something in the water here to get your dander up and make you feel violent.’
    • ‘Finally, I got my dander up and accosted him in his office.’
    • ‘People got their dander up when their trash wasn't collected.’
    • ‘But nothing gets my dander up more than blasted taxation.’
    • ‘People like to be inflamed, get their dander up, and the problem is, it's too easy.’
    • ‘If you can't bring yourself to get steamed up about ID cards, surely that image gets your dander up, even a little.’
    • ‘Corporate conduct has to be particularly poor or offensive before our judges get their dander up, but that's what seems to have happened in this case against the CBA’

Origin

Mid 19th century (originally US): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

dander

/ˈdandər//ˈdændər/

Main definitions of dander in US English:

: dander1dander2dander3

dander2

noun

  • Skin flakes in an animal's fur or hair.

    ‘you can keep your cat free of dander by proper care’
    • ‘People with allergic rhinitis develop symptoms only when exposed to the things they're allergic to, such as cat dander and ragweed pollen.’
    • ‘But animal dander (skin flakes), saliva, urine, and feathers can cause allergic reactions.’
    • ‘Dust mites and animal dander are problematic when they become airborne during vacuuming, making beds or when textiles are disturbed.’
    • ‘Allergic symptoms in these people are caused by the body's reaction to a specific protein found in the animal's saliva, urine, or dander (tiny flakes from the skin, fur, or feathers).’
    • ‘It may (but not always) help to wash the animal at least once a week to remove excess dander and collected pollens.’
    • ‘Asthma develops only in people with a genetic predisposition toward it, but that predisposition is made manifest when triggered by environmental conditions such as smoke, animal dander, and air pollution.’
    • ‘Allergy is an overreaction to environmental pollens, mites in house dust, animal dander, molds, and foods.’
    • ‘Other substances that can cause hives and angioedema include pollen, animal dander, latex and substances injected into your skin from insect stings.’
    • ‘People can have similar reactions to dust mite feces, pollen, animal dander and many other particulates in the environment.’
    • ‘I've had various animal dander allergies forever, and was having serious troubles with breathing, so the doctors decided steroidal treatments and ventilators would be best.’
    • ‘Second, if you are outside doing anything with the dog, you will be bringing dander back into the house with you and setting off your wife's allergies.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, strict avoidance of animal allergens is practically impossible, because even if domestic animals are not in the home there is still a possibility of significant exposure due to transfer of animal dander in public places.’
    • ‘House dust mites, pollens, animal dander, and other allergy-causing agents can be reduced, although not eliminated, through regular cleaning.’
    • ‘If you are allergic to dust, mold, animal dander, or other year-round allergens, there are some modifications of your environment that may help.’
    • ‘Asthma is caused by environmental triggers including cat dander, cockroaches, dust mites and tobacco smoke.’
    • ‘Although you cannot completely prevent dander from getting into your bedroom, keeping the animal out will greatly reduce the level of pet allergen in that room.’
    • ‘Animal saliva, sweat, urine and dander (flakes of dead skin) can act as powerful allergens.’
    • ‘Animal dander can create allergies that manifest only at night, and the movement of any pet on your bed can wake you up.’
    • ‘For many if not most people with asthma, a major cause of their asthma is an allergy to airborne substances such as pollen, mold, dust mites and animal dander.’
    • ‘This cleaning team, although satisfactory in every other way, was apparently the source of animal dander that caused an exacerbation of atopic symptoms in the family.’

Origin

Late 18th century: related to dandruff.

Pronunciation

dander

/ˈdandər//ˈdændər/

Main definitions of dander in US English:

: dander1dander2dander3

dander3

noun

Scottish
  • A stroll.

    ‘we'll take a bit of a dander and get the fresh air’
    • ‘Time for a dander down through Stratford to see Shapespeare's birthplace still very much preserved, sent three or four postcards, was reluctant to ask was there a bookie shop in the town.’
    • ‘Fancying a dander during the Easter holidays, I opted for a leisurely stroll around the Forest Park.’
    • ‘Hereafter it will be more of a dander, a gentle walk along the Annalong Valley, over the Brandy Pad and to other such-like hidden icons of the adventurers' world.’
    • ‘While she was at church I went for a dander along the beach.’
    • ‘By the time we got here the restaurant was near closing and we managed to throw a few steaks and a pint of the black stuff down us before a dander along the harbour and making of plans for the morrow.’

verb

Scottish
  • no object, with adverbial of direction Stroll.

    ‘he dandered in to change his coat’
    • ‘I hope he got to the chapel on time because it wouldn't be the first time he dandered in late.’
    • ‘Tom decided it was time to dander down the road to Gorman's to watch the second half with his colleagues.’
    • ‘You literally need to battle your way through the crowd and when you come across someone who is just dandering (walking slowly) you just want to push them.’
    • ‘Map in hand, I dander, uneasily, towards my hotel.’
    • ‘After that, Ginty dandered about our wee town for a while and then he stood on the street corner and watched a few cars going up and down.’

Origin

Late 16th century: frequentative form; perhaps related to dialect dadder ‘quake’ and daddle ‘dawdle’.

Pronunciation

dander

/ˈdandər//ˈdændər/