Definition of cut the (umbilical) cord in US English:

cut the (umbilical) cord

phrase

  • Cease to rely on someone or something protective or supportive and begin to act independently.

    • ‘They had to cut the cord, start fresh, and in terms of what the public is perceiving, they needed a whole new tone.’
    • ‘‘I never really cut the umbilical cord from Scotland,’ he shrugs.’
    • ‘For that matter the house where I heard the basement band is still there, but when my father moved off the block this year he cut the cord.’
    • ‘Leaving his boyhood team Rangers for Ewood Park last September, he cut the umbilical cord with a club who had nurtured him into, as of his last season in Scotland, a treble-delivering leader.’
    • ‘Are we to believe that those who reach the heady heights cut the umbilical cord because to rub shoulders with the powerbrokers is more fashionable than remembering from whence they came?’
    • ‘As much as I love this shack, it's time to go, and I'm perfectly capable of cutting the cord and heading up the hill.’
    • ‘Two years ago, the charismatic young republican seemed to have marched the islanders close to cutting the cord with Copenhagen.’
    • ‘She will commiserate with you, and share her reason for finally cutting the cord was the same, she caught him cheating.’
    • ‘They argue that, ‘savvy autocrats have learned how to cut the cord between growth and freedom, enjoying the benefits of the former without the risks of the latter.’’
    • ‘Methinks it's about time I cut the cord on this post as well as this post in which I got somewhat riled at what I thought was Tim chucking aspersions my way.’